100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

Y r

i

at

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 171 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1927 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DETROIT WILL HONOR
CHARLES A IVNDBEG

BOARD
TO

OF CO)lMERCE PLANS
HOLD ELABORATE
CELEBRATION

WILL MAKE TOUR OF CITY
More Than 200 Prominent Citizens
In Nearby City Will Turn
Out To Fete Flyer
DETROIT, May 24-Tentative plans
to welcome Capt. Charles A Lind-
bergh, Detroit-born trans-Atlantic
flier to his native city were laid yes-
terday at a meeting of the Detroit
Board of Commerce, after the Council
had cabled the City's congratulations
on the 25 year old flier's wonderful
feat and invited him to come here
when he returns from Paris.-
An elaborate program is being
drawn up by an executive committee,
headed by Lieut. Col. J. M. O'Dea, who
announced that every effort will be
made to route Lindbergh's trips
around the city in such a way as to
permit the greatest number of per-
sons to see him.3
General Reception Planned
A general reception committee of
approximately 200 persons will be
named by the executive committee
today. Col. O'Dea said that Acting Ma-
yor John C. Lodge, grand-uncle of the
flier, will be asked to take the chair-
manship of the general committee.
Other smaller committees will be ap-
pointed to dare for the various fea-
tures of entertaining Lindbergh.
Elaborate displays in the air and
on the Detroit river will mark the
day's entertainment, under present
plans. The executive committee, with
the assistance of; a dozen Detroiters
who attended the meeting yesterday,
laid out the following tentative pro-
gram, assuming that Lindbergh will
arrive at the Michigan Central Sta-
tion in the morning.
A trip by automobile with a police
cordon, from the station out the Ver-
nor highway to West Grand boule-
vard, then directly around the boule-
vard to its intersection with Jefferson
avenue east. This trip, it was pointed
out, would give residents of all parts
of the city an excellent opportunity
to view Lindbergh and would spread
out the crowds along the route.
The flier would be taken th-rough
the City hall and handed the key to
the city on the east steps of the build-
ing, again giving a large crowd an
opportunity to view Lindbergh. At the
Hotel Statler Lindbergh would be
served breakfast.
To View Old Home
Later in the morning, the commit-
tee plans to drive the flier to the
old family homestead on Forest ave-
nue west, where he was born. A bronze
tablet to commemorate that event and
to mark the spot will be placed on
the house, it is planned, and then the
party will return to the Statler or the
Book-Cadillac for a huge luncheon,
the arrangements for which will be
in the hands of Mr. Reading.
In the afternoon, Lindbergh will be
taken to the Detroit Yacht Club,
where there will be a review of the
flotilla of yachts owned by Detroit-
ers. Airplanes will be circling the
river and Belle Isle at this time, as
as they will have circled the down-
town section earlier.
Druids Hold Annual
Initiation Ceremony
By Li ght Of Torches
While staves tapped and torches lit
the way 24 members of the junio
literary class groped blindly and pain-
fully from the sacred rock in Drui
Grove up the long path to redemptior
last night, when the Druids, honorar
senior literary society, held their an
nual initiation. The latter part o
the ceremonies was held in the Union
after which a banquet was held for th
Awenyds. .
Those from whom, the toll was ex
acted were Charles Gilbert, Normal
Gabel, George Annable, Robert Dar
na'l, Wayne Schroeder, Cassam Wi

son, Addison Connor, Matthea Hudson
Paul Endriss, Louis Gilbert, Carl
Thisted, Inman Munger Robert Le-
land, Lorne Poole, Bruce Tyndall,
Carleton Champe, Thomas Dougal]
Herman Nyland, Thomas Winter
Dales Xnapp, Wilbur Petrie, 'John
Hedrick, Willliam Campbell, an'
Richard Lutes.
RNOVER..D a r t m n u t h has ac-

PREMIER BALDWIN ANNOUNCES BREAK
OF ENGLISH RELATIONS WITH RUSSIA
(Byx Associated Press) jthe advisability or justification of go-
LONDON, May 24.-;Premier Bald- ing to the length the government had
win made in the House of Commons gone.
today perhaps the gravest announce- What he outlined, quoting from
ment Parliament has had to listen to various of the seized documents for
since the war-that the British gov- the purpose, was proof of various
ernment had decided to sever all rela- subversive activities by Soviet agents,
tions with Russia. By a curious coin- and that there was no differentiation
cidence it was Empire Day, when the to be made between these activitiesf
whole nation celebratesits loyalty and and the activities of the trade dele-
unity. Also by the chances of tra- gation. It was a deliberate and sys-
vail, Ramsey McDonald, former Labor tematic abuse of the diplomatic prix-
premier, whose government it was ileges by the Soviet authorities, which,
which first recognized the Soviet gov- the Premier contended, justified the
ernment, arrived just too late to hear government in its grave decision to
the Prime Minister make his momen- ask Parliament to sever all relations.
tons statement, which was listened to-
in a tense silence by a crowded house GIVES LINDBERGH
and a large diplomatic gathering, in-
cluding the German and Cantonese PRIZE OF $25,000
ambassadors.
It was a formidable indictment
1 which the head of the government,a
I replacing for the occasion Sir William
Joynston-Hicks, home secretary, andr
Sir Austen Chamberlain, foreign sec-;
retary, who previously had charge of :
the matters, had to bring against the ..
Soviet authorities a justification for
e t government's decision.
Premier Baldwin's comparatively I
short speech delivered in a low and
I serious tone, appeared to carry full:
conviction, at least to all the members
of the Conservative party, and even
to some of the Liberals, where before
some doubt had been entertained on
PLACE NAVY SHIPS AT ..
;:r::r i .
DISPOSAL OF AVIATOR
I Navy Department Sends Offer Across.
Sea To Lindbergh For Return :
Journey To America
EXPECT TO SAIL JUNE 15 --

|NEL BRE K IN LEVEE
FLOODS VAST AREA IN,
LOUISIANA__LOWLANDS,,
LANDS COMPLETELY INUNDATED
UNDER 50 MILE SHEET OF
CREVASSE WATERS
EVACUATE MANY PARISHESf
Army Of Workers Battle Against Blows
Of Rushing Torrents; Fear Levee
Near Melville May Fall I
(By Associated Press)
NEW ORLEAN$, May 24.-The lastI
dry land between levees of the Missis-
sippi and rolling highlands beyond the
west bank of the Atchafalaya was van-
ishing tonight as w a t e r streamed
through a rent in the dikes at McCrae,
on the east bank of the Atchafalaya,.
to form a solid sheet of water almost I
50 miles wide.
Before the flood waters have van-
I ished into the Gulf of Mexico, they
will cut a path 50 miles -wide and 200
miles long from the Arkansas border
to the Gulf.
Moke Parish Destroyed
Five additional parishes with an
area of 1,100,000 acres and the homes .
of 80,000 persons were thrown open
to invasion by the inland sea when
the river tore aside the protecting bar-
riers at McCrae and spread water
over the lowlands of Pointe Coupree
parish.
Large portions of 15 parishes inj
northeastern Louisiana still were un-1
der water as the flood moved down the i
south central Louisiana "sugarbowl,"
through a torn levee line along Bayou,
Des Glaises and at Melville on the
west bank of the Atchafalaya and
striking into the new territory in the
Atchafalaya basin through the Mc-
Crae crevasse.
Sandbags Swirled Away
A new sandbag dike had been built
behind the crumbling old levee line.
Throughout the night the current bat-
tered the banks with. swift blows as
the water raced southward to stream
through the Melville crevasse. Early
today there were indications that the
line might fall. Workmen assembled
on the levee. There was but a feeble
splash, barely audible above the roar
of the river, as the first sandbag
dropped into the water near the cen-
ter of the new line and the stream
t tricked through. Then other sections
of the emban1nent crumbled and with
a roar the river broke into the low-
lands.
Late today the water had torn a
breach more than 1,000 feet wide
through the levee line. Weather bu-
reau bulletins said that the greater
portion of Poine Coupee, West Baton
' Rouge, Iberville and Assumption par-
ishes, would be flooded, the eastern
extremities of the lake extending to
Bayou La Sourche and covering a
portion of La Sourche parish. Resi-
dents of the threatened territory were
warned by Mr. Parker today to aba.n-
don their homes. A half dozen large
f towns and a score of smaller ones
- are in the path of the flood and tele-
graphic warnings w e r e broadcast
j'through the area.
OREGON AGRICULTURAL COL
LEGE-Of the students who were pu
on probation during the first term 71
- per cent received no warnings fo
e this semester.

REED ADVOCATES NON-PARTISANSHIP
FOR ANN ARBOR CITY GOVERNMENT

"Of the four generally used sys-
tems of local city government, that
now in existence in Ann Arbor is the
most inefficient and antiquated," Prof.
Thomas H. Reed, of the political
science department of the University
said in an interview yesterday. In
classifying the four forms as those,
having a city manager, those having a
commission form with a small re-
sponsible group, those having both a
strong mayor and a city council, and
those having a mayor whose powers
are restricted by the council. Ann Ar-
bor, he stated, was governed under
the latter plan, which is the poorestj
STUDENTS HONORED AT
ORATORICAL BANQUET,
New Officers Of Oratorical Association
Installed; Medals Awarded
To Debaters
MILLER IS NEW HEAD
Installation of the new officers,
.elected at the recent spring election
was the principal feature of the ban-
quet given last night at the Union by
the Oratorical association. All stu-
dents who have distinguished them-
selves in any way in forensic activi-
ties during the past year were guests
of the association and medals were
given out to members of the Varsity
debating teams in the Midwest and
Central leagues and to the orators
who have won honors during the year.
The women's debating teams also re-
ceived their medals at this time.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister of the pub-

of the four for the efficient adminis-
tration of public office.
The chief fault of this system lies
in the irresponsibility arising under
partisan political methods of election
and administration. "We should have
a non-partisan form of election," he
asserted, in pointing out that partis-
anship was a fundamental weakness
in the efficient administration of pub-
lic business. "It is my belief," he con-
tinued, "that there should be no con-
nection between political parties and
running the city. Where partisanship
does exist, centering or responsibilityl
is almost impossible, and a system of
checks and balances will not curb
passing the buck."
The recent matter of appointment
of public officials by the mayor is a
good example of the inefficiency of
the present system, he declared in
showing that the mayor's appoint-
ments were turned down because the
council was of the opposite political
party. Under this method of organ-
ization either a compromise or a dead-
lock results over any vital issue of
public welfare, and neither the mayor
nor the council may be held to ac-
count for the inefficiency of Ann Ar-
bor's governmental machinery.
ANNOUNCE PLANS FORONT 1H
Professor Gould Reports Arrange-
ments For Trip To Baffin
Island This Summer

CHOOSE TWO M'ICHIGAN
MEN AS FINALISTS IN
COLLEGE FILM TRIALS
WILCOX AND ENTON WINNERS
IN FINAL DECISION OF
CONTEST ,JURORS
ALTERNATES ARE NAMED
Search For New Film Talent Ends In
Selection of Ten Men From
American Colleges
(Special to The Daily)
HOLLYWOOD, Calif., May 24 -
Among the ten finalists in the national
collegiate film talent contest two
Michigan men, Leland S. Wilcox, '27,
and Thomas K. Denton, '28, were chos-
en here late Monday night, Arthur
Lee, '28E, was picked as one of the
alternates.
The following telegram was receiv-
ed by The Daily yesterday from John
McCormick, {general manager of the
West Coast Productions of the Nation-
al Picture Corporations of Hollywood,
Calif., concerning the contest:
"I am exceedingly happy to inform
you that Leland S. Wilcox and Thom-
as Kelcey Denton of the University of
(Michigan, were selected today by the
I combined jury consisting of newspaper
representatives and the sales depart-
ment of the First National Pictures,
Incorporated, headed by Ned Depinet,
as two of the ten winners in the na-
tional search for college talent which
we have just conducted in the leading
universities and colleges of the coun-
try with the cooperation of College
Humor.

i

PUTNAM LEADS VENTURE.
Returning from Washington and
New York after a brief visit Profes-

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 24-Navy de-
stroyers were placed today at the dis-
posal of Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh,
New York to Paris flier, for his rettirni
home and the transportation to this
country of his plane, "The Spirit of
St. Louis."
This offer was flashed across the
sea after a call at the White House
by Assistant Secretary Robinson of
the Navy as the President and all
Washington continued to admire and
make plans for honoring the youthful
aviator.
Making known that destroyers of
the 25th division now in European
waters were available to Captain
Lindbergh, President Coolidge reflect-
ed today that the accomplishment of
America's aviator was something that
grew on one the more it was contem-
plated. The more that is learned of
his feat, he considers, the greater it
seems to have been.
Commander W. Galbraith, in charge
of the destroyer division; was direct-
ed by the navy to inform Lindbergh
that he can return to his homeland
aboard a destroyer and that his plane
can be brought back the .same way.
It is planned to sail for America June
15.
Meanwhile other means of showing
its admiration were under considera-
tion by the administfation and the
city of Washington. The hope has been
expressed that a formtof martial dec-
oration can be given to Lindbergh by
the government at Washington as has
been done in the past for various dis-
tinguished persons.
ITALIAN FLYER IS
TOWED INTO PORT

Raymond Orteig, donor of the fam-
ous $25,000 prize for a New York-
Paris non-stop airplane flight, is a
noted New York restauranteur who
came to America from France nearly
forty years ago.
ANDREWS TO GIVE
SPEECH TODAY AT
SEMINAR -MEETING
Dr. John Bertram Andrews, econo-
mist, will address the final meetingI
of the School of Religion's seminar1
in the moral issues of modern life
this afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in Na-
tural Science auditorium. Dr. An-
drews will speak on "The Approach
through Labor Legislation to Social
Welfare."
Dr. Andrews is the secretary of the
American Association for Labor Leg-
islation and has been associated with
labor problems for some time. He is
the founder and editor of the Amer-
ican Labor Legislation Review, a
quarterly magazine, and is a member
of the executive committee for Labor
legislation. He was also a member of
the President's unemployment confer-
ence in 1921.
ANNOUNCE 'ENSIAN
BUSINESS STAFFS
Appointments to the Upper Michi
ganensian business staffs were made
yesterday by Margaret H. Breer, '28,
women's business manager, and C.
Wayne Brownell, '28, business man-
ager. Dorothy Odle, Marian Keyser
Alice Platt, Helen Westcott, Margaret
Moore, and Louise Cooley have been
made members of the staff with Miss
Westcott in charge of the files.
The remaining positions are as fol-
lows: advertising manager, Edward
Wachs; orgahization and' foreign ad,
vertising manager, Charles Spicer;
sales and distribution manager, Ton
Yates; and accounts manager, Art
Knisley. All those appointed to the
upper staff are of the class of 1929.
S---
WISCONSIN - Exam bluebooks arE
said to have been originated here i:
1S97.

lic speaking department presented the .- nWI------ .,Is Serious Endeavor
medals to the students, commending sor L. M. Gould has announced that "I am exceedingly happy also that
them for the records them have made. final plans for the Putnam Expedition men from your school were selected
He spoke at brief as to the activities to Baffin Island have been completed. because we regard the University of
of each team and contestant. Prof. Prof. Gould went to Washington to Michigan as a great institution with a
Gail Densmnore than spoke on the re-naialnfuceWehptatwn
lation existing between the Oratorical consult Mr. Lester Jones, head of the national influence. We hope that when
lIo exsig ewentWilcox and Denton come out they will
association and the debating teams, United StatesvGeodeticnSurvey, .who be im d wcoxnaint theseriousness of
of which he is coach. is to supply various instruments for ipesdwt h.sroseso
New President Introduced the expedition. He also consulted Dr. our endeavortand that they will some
1 Following the two addresses, Je. L. A. Bauer of the Carnegie Insti- u day b o mpo personalitiesn
rona Mikesell, '27L, retiring presi. tute about studies in magnetism tonouroto thupp uingcetei rnd
dent of the Oratorical association, be made in Bafliin Land. ed
gave a short talk in which he intro- Dipping needles, tide gauges, map- over.
duced Robert S. Miller, '28, the new- ping and surveying instruments, and Westwood of Princeton, Miles Clen-
ly elected president. Miller was sun compasses have been secured, ac- enin of California, Jon iVan Cleve
sworn into office, and following the cording to Prof. Gould, and every- IStuart Clayton Knox
ceremony the other new officers, thing is in readiness for the xpedi- of Yale, Warner Graham Smoot of
Lyle Eiserman, '28, Laura Soule, '28, tion's departure from New York on Northwestern, John Howland Stam-
and Paul J. Kern, '29, were installed, June 12. The party plans to go di- baugh of Chicago, -D. C. Cassidy of
as vice president, secretary, and rect. to Fox Basin aboard the polar Georgia School of Technology, and
treasurer, respectively. ship Norrissey captained by Robert I Edward E. Karges of Northwestern.
Miller spoke on the prospects of Bartlett of arctic' fame. There,' the "There is a possibility that some of
the association for the next year, out- western shore of Baffin Island will Ith men selected may for one reason
lining the policy as he plans it, and be surveyed and mapped and geologi- or another be prevented from accept-
finally called on the last speaker of cal studies made. The region into Ig this opportunity and therefore the
the evening Professor-emeritus Thom- which the expedition is going has ,int j rtunityeacd theefoeoth
beenexplred y awhite man. Joint jury has selected the ten follow,.
as Trueblood, for 38 years head of the never been explored by a hinelman.ing men as alternates: Robert Thurs-
- public speaking department and fou- Luke Foxe visited the land in 131, ton of Cornell, James Sledge of Tex-
der of the Oratorical association, who but he failed to penetrate inland or as, James Richardson of Vanderbilt,
retired last year. / to explore- the coast.arrison Lewis of Harvard, Rogers
_ Professor Trueblood outlined tihe "Probably the reason that no one Follanshee of Harvard, Malcolm Brown
history of the organization from its has been there is because no one can
early days and founding in 1890, tell- get near it," Prof. Gould said. "The , Arthur Lee of Michigan, Harold
e ing of the growth and expansion to water is extremely shallow along th Griffin of Stanford, gd James Stew-
the present, when it annually brings shores. We are going to use two art of Southern California.
ten of the leading platform artists of power launches for small expeditions Would Like Movie Course
the country- to Ann Arbor. from the m-in ship. We shall map "I hope and believe that before
t the coast-line and explore inland as "man Years pass there will be a well
far as possible. Questions of glyeas-
-SENIORS ASSEBLE lion and physiography will interest established curriculum preparing men
Sus most, but we are also going to and women for careers in the different
tm TONIGHT FOR SING m ttudies fo t branches of the motion picture indus-
-gmaie Imagnetic studieNorth magnei try in all the prominent scholastic
r Seniors of all colleges of the Uni is located near there" institutions throughout the world.
versity will meet at 7:15 o'clock to- A Pathe moving picture operator is "Again let me express my real re-
night in front of the library for the to accompany the party and make a gret that a man from every college
' annual;Senior Sing, which has been pictorical record of the expedition.b was not selected by judges but never-
Ipostponed totiIaedet h theless we feel that all college men
to tis dte de totheshort-wave length radio set will enable Iwl eitrse nterslso
death of Dean Lloyd. The Varsity the party to keep in constant wcommu- this search and In the careersthat
tion with the event, to start at 7:15 nic on wit. the winners will carve out for them-
1 o'clock, and the Girls' Glee club will selves on the screen because these ten
be present to aid in the singing. I LIT TLE TO SPEAK are but forerunners of many college
All seniors are expected to ;wear A T CLUB MEETING men who will enter the motion picture
caps and gowns, as is customary, andMindustry in the future.
the event will not last more than an
hour and a half, it was announced Speaking on "The Biology of Can- PROFE S K
by Clarence Hostrup, '27, chairman of cer," President Clarence Cook Little ON// l
the affair, yesterday. will address' members of the faculty GIVES SPEECH
In the event of rain the sing will at the May meeting of the Research C LLOID CHARGES
be held in Hill auditorium at 7:30 club at 8 o'clock tonight in roomL
o'clock. Forest Brimacombe, '27, and ' 2528, East Medical building.
Helen Crawford, '27, have assisted --- Speaking on the electric charge of
Hostrup as the committee in charge SENIORS HEAR DEAN DAY olloids, Dr. H. R. Kruyt, professor
1Iof the event. ___ of physical chemistry at the Univer-
ofisiteShloBs.ssity of Utrecht, Holland, lectured yes
T LITTLE WORKING A s o in the School of Business terday afternoon in the chemistry am-
T Administration held their annua dinphitheater. This was the second of a
C ATIONS NEXT FALL ner with the faculty of the school last series of lectures to be given during
night in the Union. Dean Edmund this week on the general topic off "The

(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 24.-His "Home to
Rome" flight interrupted by another
stroke of ill fortune, Commander
Francisco De Pinedo was safely at or
near Fayal, Azores, tonight.
Details still were lacking on the
mishap which brought him down near
the end of his 1,600-mile jump from
Trepassy, N. F., but dispatches from
Lisbon said De PpIedo was not in-
jured in the landing, and his boat, the
Santa Maria II, was being towed
into port.
TO HEAR SPANISH TALK
Professor Navarro Tomas of Mad-
rid, will deliver a lecture in Spanish
at 4:15 this afternoon in room "C'
of the .Law building, and another to
morrow afternoon at the same time
and place.
NEW COUNCIL OFFICERS
WILL ASSEMBLE TONIGHT
All mmhers of this Year's

.
[ -
d '

BIG TEN STANDINGS

W..
Illionis.........7
J\ICHIGAN.......6
Iowa ............5
Purdue ..........5
Wisconsin........4
Northwestern ....5
Minnesota........2
Ohio State .......5
Indiana ..........2
Chicago ..........1

L.
3
3
3
4
3
5
2
6
6
8

Pct.
.700
.667
.625
.555
.571
.500
.500
.455
.250
111.

Yesterday's Scores
Wisconsin 7, Minnesota 3.
Illinois-Purdue-called off,

rain.

e

COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY PRESIDEN
ON TENTATIVE PLANS FOR CONVO

4
e
'

Tentative plans for the fall series
of Sunday convocations to be held in
Hill auditorium are now being made
and will be practically completed be-
fore the close of the present semes-
ter, according to a statement from
John '. Snodgrass '28E, member of the
nsecial nmmittee nnointed 1b Pres-

the political field. They will address
the convocations on some problems of
life as they see them.
Rev. Charles W. Gilkey pastor of the
Hyde Park church, Chicago, is also on1
the list of the committee. Rev. Gilkey'
is the foremost pastor in the United1
States who has associated himeslf
I with the vouth movement.

Karl Reiland is the last of thet
speakers who has been decided uponF
by the committee. Rev. Reiland is thet
pastor of St. George's church in New l
York city.
According to members of the com-
mittee, the recent protest of a locall
pastor will not effect the convocationsI
: +ntnh f ,+mir T.h.r have been endorsed

Day and Prof. John Mitchell were i
the principal speakers. Raymond J.
Perring, '27B Ad, acted as toastmas-
ter.
LANTERN NIGHT PROGRAM }
WILL BE HELD TOMORROW
I Lantern N i g h t ceremonies I

Trend of Thought in Modern sColloidt
Chemistry."
Dr. Krrlyt dealt with the fact that
the stability of colloids depends on
the presence of electrolytes. The first
important research into colloids was
made, according to Dr. Kruyt ,by Per-
vis, a well known Parisian physicist,
in 1903. The studies of Elissofoff,
mafe in 1912 and 1914. and those

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan