100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 19, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

5kk

.Iaxitg

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

i

0

VOL. XXXVII. No. 166

TEN PAGES

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1927

TEN PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

- -

UNKNOWN NUMBER Il
AS CRAZY DYNAMITER
BLASTS SCHOOLHOUSE,
UI'RTY.SEVEN ARE KNOWN DEAD
Wi EN TWO EXPILOSIONS
WRECK C1IOOIL
MANIAC BURNS OWN BARN
State Police, Doctors, Nurses Recover
Bodies And Clear Wreckage As
Bereaved Parents Watch
(By Associated Press)
BATH, May 18.-The cunningly'
conceived work of a madman caused
the death today of at least 37 men,
women and little children and the1
serious injury of at least 35 other
persons when a dynamite trap ex-
ploded in the Bath Township Con- I
solidated school house, completely
wrecking the wooden north wing of
the building.
Two terrific blasts of dynamite and
gunpowder, planted in the partitionsf
of the basement and in other parts of1
the building, wrecked the schoolhouse
as students and teachers were at
work.
The handiwork of Andrew Kehoe,
expert electrician, farmer and dis-
grunted treasurer of the Bath town-
ship school board brought sorrow to
every home in this little town and
throughout the township.1
Not content with the destruction he
had caused, the demented farmer
caused the death of Emery E. Huyck,
principal of the school and two by-
standers by firing a shot from an
army rifle into a box of dynamite in'
the rear end of his automobile. This
explosion tore Kehoe's body into
pieces, instantly killed Huyck, tore
the legs from Glen Smith, postmaster
of Bath, and killed Nelson McFarran. 1
Smith died on the way to a Lansing
hospital. d
Prior to the explosion Kehoe had
set fire to his farmhouse and out-
buildings which were burned to the
ground.
-uried calls for help sent to the
Michigan State police at East Lansing
and for nurses and doctors brought
immediate response with the result
that by late afternoon the ruins of
the building had been torn away.{
.The bodies of the little children,
few of whom were older than 12
years, were stretched in a row on the
ground covered by blankets carried
to the scene by neighbors..j
Lt. Laurence Lyons, of the State
police, one of the first to arrive, took
immediate charge of the rescue work.
Within an hour after the explosion
State police and the fathers and
mothers of the children had recovered{
a score of burned and torn bodies
from the wreckage..
As body after body was handed out
the screams of mothers could be heard
above the noise of the workers tearing
madly at the bricks and timbers which I
obstructed entrance to the center of
the building.
One young boy sat weeping on a
timber. He had been hurled through
a window by the blast. The body of
his ten-year old sister had just been
brought from the ruins.
Automobiles rapidly spread the news!
throughout the township and brought
terrified mothers and fathers to the
school. Little groups gathered in the
schoolyard, largely women weeping.
Axe and shovel applied in the base-'
ment of the school building disclosed
a network of wires and hidden
charges of dynamite and gunpowder.
The wires were cunningly concealed
in the partition and run through pipes
and pieces of bamboo poles. A shorted

wire which led through the basement
of the wooden structure to a concrete
structure recently constructed, prob-
ably saved the lives of children in the
other buildings.
SOUND AUTHORITY!
WILL SPEAK HERE'
This afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in
Natural Science auditorium, Irving
S'andorf. '23E, will speak on "The Usej
of the Electric Harmonic Analyser in
En gireering". Mrt Sandorf after com--
pleting his course here has been con-
nected with the Development and Re-
scarch department of the American
Telegraph and Telephone company in
New York City.
While with this department he has
been engaged in research on the prob-i
lem of sound analization and breaking
down the vibration of sound. It is
through work such as this that the
noise in our telephones and motors

NINETEEN ENDURE
TERRIFIC TORTURE
OF HONOR GROUPS
Ten members of the junio literary
class, having proved their mettle by
a long, perilous journey across the
burning sands and down the river
Nile, were initiated into Sphinz, junior
honorary society of the College of,
Literature, Science, and the Arts, at
their annual banquet last night at the
Union. The men who entered, the por-
tals of the organization after passing,
through the initiation rites are: Fred-
erick Asbeck, Harlan Cristy, Edward
Hulse, Paul J. Kern, Ernest McCoy,]
John Miller, Ralph Popp, George Rich,
John Tarbill, and Edward Wachs.
While these events were transpiring
nine members of the engineering
class scrubbed their way into Tri-
angles, junior honorary engineering
society. The Engineering arch receiv-
ed its semi-annual cleaning at the
hands of the neophytes. The men whoi
were admitted to that ancient organ-
ization are: Harold Bailey, John Ber-
gelin, William Fortune, John Gilmar-
tin, George Hubbell, Richard Williams,
Otto Pommerening, Phillip Slayton
and Richard Spindle. Frank Cory, who
was killed reently in an automobile
accident, had also been voted to mem
bership in the society.
ANNOUNCE DECORTIVE
PLAN OF SENIOR BALL'
Unique Lighting Effects And Floralt
Decorations Feature Setting 1
Of Annual Senior Dance
JACK CRAWFORD TO PLAY
.1
By combining unique and fantastic
indirect lighting effects with elaborate1
floral decorations, the Union ball-
room will be transformed into a color-
ful flower garden in which the class
of 1927 will hold their annual dance I
tomorrow night. Colored shadows in
futuristic designs will cast their odd
shapes over the walls and ceiling,
harmonizing with the dignified beauty
of the ,ballroom in its softly illuminat-
ed spring garden setting.
Stately palms, ferns, clusters of al-
mond blossoms, intermingled with tu-
lips, daffodils, ad peonies will adorn
the chaperone booth at the south end
of the ballroom. Surrounded by a
hedge of arbor vitae and boxwood
blossoms, the orchestra will play from
beneath an arched palm and climbing
wistaria arbor having a background
of ferns, tulips and daisies. A huge
basket of dogwood blossoms and pam-
pas grass, banked with palms and
ferns will decorate the fireplace.
Wrought iron candelabras and stand-
ards filled with cut flowers and ferns
placed around the ballroom will com-
plete the decorative effect planned.
by the committee. Use of the small
ballroom and the balcony porch has
also been granted, it was announced!
yesterday.
Indications point to an evening of
incomparable dance music and enter-
tainment by Jack Crawford and his;
orchestra of Chicago night club fame.
who promise to outdo themselves in
their first engagement on this cam-
pus. They have also played at the
junior class dances of the University
of Wisconsin and at Notre Dame, and
come directly fromhtheir engagement
at th'e opening of the new Hotel Ste-
vens in Chicago.
Stuart H. Sinclair, general chair-
man of the committee, yesterday an-
nounced a complete sell out of the 325
ticket limit to members of the senior
class.1
WEBB APPOINTED
TO CITY POSITION

F. C. Webb, formerly associated
with the state highway laboratory at
the University has been appointed
pavement inspector by City Engineer
George H. Sandenburgh.
Mr. Webb, whose appointment is
subject to the approval of the board
of public works will be in the service
of the city during the summer con-
struction program. He is now on duty
on Dexter Avenue where curb and
gutter construction in preparation for
paving is in progress.
Recent rains have delayed the Dex-
ter Avenue project, the city engineer
reports. Excavation of the roadway
will follow curb and gutter work;
which will be completed. soon.
The Henry Street storm sewer is
nearing completign. according to an
announcement by 'the city engineer'.I
A 1FI1 Del D)FrDFC

SECOND MAYIFESTIVAL
CONCERT TO FEATURE
music ,O EBEETHOVEN
TONIGhT'S PROGRAM TO MARK
HIUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY
OF3COMPOSER'S DEATH
TO HONOR KELSEY, LLOYD
Program Will Be Presented By Choral
Union, Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra, Metropolitan Opera Quartet
With the Beethoven numbers as the
main features, the second concert of
the thirty-fourth annual May Festi-
val will be held in Hill auditorium n
tonight. A repetition of last night's
crowded audience is expected by
Charles A. Sink, secretary and busi-
ness manager of the School of Music,
sponsor of the Festival.
Compositions by Ludwig Von Bee-
thoven, including the "Leonore No.
3" will fill the entire program to-
night, in observance of the one-hun-
dredth anniversary of the death of the
composer. A quartet from the Met-
ropolitan Grand Opera company, the
University Choral union, under the
direction of Earl V. Moore. and the
Chicago Symphony orchestra, will
present the program. The Choral
Union comprises a body of more
than 300 voices.
As a mark of respect to the late
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey, of the Latin
department, who was president of the
board of the directors of the School of
Music, and to the late Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd of the Graduate School, the
Funeral March from the Eroica Sym-
phony will be played by the orchestra,
in place of the "Scene from Fidelio
2," which was to have been liven by
the quartet. '
Quartet Will Sing
"Missa Solemnis, a choral work,
will be presented by the quartet, con-
sisting of Betsy Lane Shepherd, so-
prano; Elsie Baker, contralto; Arthur
Hackett, tenor; and William Sim-
mons, baritone. The Choral union and
the orchestra will support the num-
ber. The orchestra is under the di-
rection of Frederick Stock.
Arthur Hackett has recently re
turned to America from a three-year
absence in Europe. He has had con-
siderable experience in the field of
oratorio and concert, and has ap-
peared with the greatest symphony
orchestras in the country. Elsie Baker
is well known through her singing'
for records. Simmons and Shepherd
are prominent figures in the musical
field.
Choral Union To Sing,
The Choral union will appear again
in the Friday and Saturday night
programs, while the orchestra is sup-
porting all of the remaining festival
concerts.
The feature of last night's program
was the appearance of Madame Ernes-
tine Schumann-Heink, in one of the
last concerts of her fiftieth anniver-
ary seasson. The' Chicago Symphony
orchestra, with Dr. Howard Hanson,
of the Eastman School of Music, Ro-
chester, N. Y. as guest conductor,
presented the "Heroic Elegy", writ-
ten by Dr. Hanson at the request of
the national committee for the Beet-
hoven centenary anniversary.
FORMER MANAGER
MAY BUY INDIANS
(My Associated Press)
CLEVELAND, May 18.-Tris Speak-
er, former manager of the Cleveland
Indians, and several associates are in
the market to purchase the Cleveland

baseball club, it was learned here to-
night.
Speaker, who now is playing with
the Washington club, approached Mrs.
James C. Dunn, owner of the Indi-!
ans, in Chicago last week with a
proposition to purchase the teamj
which he managed for years.
Mrs. Dunn, months ago, signified
her willingness to sell provided that
she receives the price that she be-
lieves right. She informed Speaker,
it is understood, that her price is
$580,000, or $200 a share for her hold-
ings, and Speaker replied that he
would continue the negotiations.
Friends of the veteran baseball star
revealed here today that it is his
greatest ambition to return to Cleve-
land as part owner of the tribe.
Several prominent Cleveland men
are reported to have joined Speaker
I in his proposition.
I?1ICI-IPRA kvW lCfIL

1700 YEAR BOOKS
ISSUED FIRST DAY

FLOOD PERIL CAUSES
riinLi riaL ru

?!ore than 1700 of the 1927 Mich- HI H I fl lii IIII
iganensians were distributed yester- I 11 I IU i Ull
day, the first clay of distribution, it
was announced by Wayne Brownell,
28, business manager yesterday. The NUPMISSISSIPP
,'clc in thebasement ofrthe Library
and will continue from there until ATACHATAFAAYA BASIN IS SCENE
Friday when the year-books will be OF LATEST MENACE FROM
removed to the 'Ensian office in the NEW LEVEE BREAKS
Press building. The books will be held
for those who have bought them until ONE DIES AT MELVILLE
JTune 1.
Anone who has lost histrecei Telephone Operators Spread News Of
the Press building. Either a receipt or Imminent Treet; nhabitants
a duplicate must be presented in or- Of 27 TCwms Urged To Flee
dci' to obtain a copy of the book. More'I
than 3000 copies will he distributed (By Associated Press)
within the next two weeks. NEW ORLEANS, May 18-Inhabit-
ants of 27 towns in the path of the
wall of water sweeping down the Ata-
chafalaya basin tonight were beingI
J ~warned to flee their homes under in- I
structions issued early tonight by
flood relief director John F. Parker.
I Mr. Parker, basing his warning upon
ja bulletin of the New Orleans weather

11

Honor For Scholastic Excellence Of
Business Administration School
Is Given By Dean Day
IS SECOND YEARLY AWARD
Presentation of the Delta Sigma Pi'
key for proficiency in scholarship
was the' main feature of a banquet
held last night in the Union by mem-
bers of the fraternity for the faculty
and seniors of the School of Business
Administration. The award was made
to George L. Hull, '27B. Ad. Dean
Edmund E. Day was the principal
speaker at the dinner.i
"This award represents not only
a recognition of a high degree of
scholarship and intellectual capacity,
but at the same time a great amount
of hard work," Dean Day stated. "To
these two factors is added that of the
elements of character-almost the
most important in the whole consider-
ation.
"There are other men in the school,
as was well demonstrated during the
competition for the key, whom one
could set apart as almost sure bets
for success in the business world.
These all combine the traits which
have been mentioned."
Dean Day spoke of the comparative
infancy of the School of Business
Administration as considered with the
others on the campus, but added that
it was headed right, as such awards
and traditions as that of the scholar-
ship key portended. He said that the
part played by the students them-
selves in the experience of the school
was most 'important, and that he had
hopes for more frank relationships
with the faculty as had been encour-
aged so far. In conclusion he ex-
pressed the thought that something
tangible and beneficial would come of
this unique relationship-enjoyed by
those in none of the other schools and
colleges because of the wide differ-
ences in enrollment.i
This is the second year that the
award of the key has been made. No
(other basis is considered other than
that of scholarship in the two years
of work which the school embraces.
The judging of the competitors was
done by Dean Day and Prof. John P.
Mitchell.I
NOTED COMEDIAN
AND DANCER DIE
(By Associated Press)
LAUSANNE, Switzerland, May 18-
Maurice Mouvet, world famous cab-
aret dancer, died oftuberculosis this
evening in a private hospital here.(
His wife, EleanoriAmbrose, the fifth
and last partner of his fame, and his
brother Oscar attended him in his last
moments.
There had been a turn for the bet-
ter last week, and his brother had ar-
Sranged to leave, but a relapse came at
I the end of the week and it was appar-
ent there was no hope. Maurice sank
rapidly and became unconscious yes-!
terday.
NEW YORK, May 18-Sam Bernard,
well loved comedian, whose funny
faces and grotesq.ue dialect have de-
lighted three generations of theater-
goers died of apoplexy Tuesday night
at sea. News of his death was report-
ed today by a wireless message from
the liner Columbus to the North Ger-
man Lloyd offices here. He was 64
years old.
TOWN WIPED OUT
WHEN DAM FAILS
(By Associated Press)

bureau today, charting the path of thej
flood through the section, had a corps
of telephone operators spreadingthe
message to the inhabitants urging
them to speed the evacuation if they
would save their belongings.
There will be no forcible evacuation
but the message of the flood relief
dictator strove to impress upon the!
inhabitants the seriousness of the
flood danger and the imminence of the
threat.
NEW ORLEANS, May 18-Five hun-
dred persons ,grouped on the narrow
crown of the levee above Melville.
Louisiana, today saw the last link con-
necting their town with high ground
cut off.!
Bridge Carried Away ,
A span of the Texas and Pacific
bridge connecting Melville with the1
east bank of the Atachafalaya river
collapsed, carrying to his death Tony
Pitilala, a farmer.
Few persons, however, were left inj
the immediate path of the two expand-j
ing lakes of Avoyales and St. Land-
rey's parishes tonight.
Fed by flood waters in crevasses in,
the Atachafalaya levees at Melville
and in the Bayou DesGlaises ram-
parts, the lakes joined at Big Bend
to engulf virtually the whole of two
parishes.
Spreading outward from the Bayou
DesGlaises crevasse the flood had sub-
. merged Morrow, Big Cane, Palmetto,
and Rosa. Ooelousas on a ridge in the

DARGUE TO MAKE
FLIGHT O V E R 33
EASTERN S T A T E S
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 18. - Major
Herbert L. Dargue, who commanded
the Army Pan-American flight, will
Sleave Washington next Monday on a
good will tour of the eastern half of
the United States, which will take
him across 33 states.
The flight which is expected to con-
sume more than six weeks will be
made on the "New York II," flag ship
on the Pan-American flight. Walter
0. Lochner, of Canton, N. J., presi-
(lent of the National Association of
Commercial Organization Secretaries
will be a passenger. Messages of good
will from official Washington will be
personally delivered to the governors
of the states visited.
Many cities on the itinerary where
stops will not be made will be circled
by the airplanes. The itinerary con-
tains Fort Wayne, Detroit, Lansing
and Grand Rapids.
'WRECKAGE A E S
NOT FRENCH AIRPLANE1
Court Action 'Delays Bertand Flight;
Inclement Weather Prevents
Byrd Departure
MODOC RESUMES COURSE
(By Associated Preis)
WASHINGTON, May 18.-The hope
that wreckage reported at sea by the
Shipping board steamer Bellecline
might be a part of the Nungesser-
Coli plane was dashed today when
coast guard seaplanes sent to the
scenes to investigate reported that it,
was a portion of a fisherman's dory.
The Coast Guard cutter Modoc
which has been stationed in the path,
of the trans-Atlantic flight so that
she might guide -the American fliers;
by throwing up a smoke screen sig-
nal has been withdrawn temporarily
from that duty. Because of an in-I
crease in the number doficebergs inI
the traffic lanes, the Modoc wi'll re-
sume duty with the international ice
patrol, but she will return to her lo-
cation about 1500 miles in an air line
from New York in time to signal the
American fliers after they take off.
PARIS, May 18.-The gallant at-

COLGATE SCORES 1 2
WIN OVERl WOLVERINE
TEAM IN DULL GAME
MICHIGAN PITCHERS WEAKEN
BEFORE BATTIN4, ATTACK
OF EASTERNERS
ERRORS FAVOR VISITORS
Hopkins, Colgate Pitching Ace, Holds
Baseball Team To Four Hits;
Scores Nine Strike Outs
Colgate batters pounded the offering
of three Wolverine pitchers while
Hopkins, the Maroon hurling ace held
Michigan helpless, granting only four
hits during the entire of yesterday's
uninteresting game on Ferry field. The
final score of the fray was 12-2 in
favor of the Easterners.
The' one outstanding performance
of the day was turned in by Hopkins,
Colgate pitcher. In addition to holding
the Wolverines to four hits, none of
which w'nt'for extra bases, he struck
out nine batsmen and dfd not Issue
a single base on balls. He also made
a two base hit and a single, and scor-
ed one run. Hopkins had good control
and change of pace coupled with ef-
fective cross fire.
The Michigan pitchers, however,
were less fortunate. Gilmartin retired
in the third in favor of Lowe after
five Colgate runners had crossed the
plate in the preceding inning. Lowe
was removed after an inning and one-
third, leaving Ruetz to finish the
game. The latter mana~ged fairly well
until the seventh inning, up to which
time there appeared to be some hope .
of a Wolverine victory. All such Ideas
vanished, however, with a two run
rally by Colgate in this inning. As if'
this were not enough, the Maroons
batted around in the ninth to add five
more tallies.
Michigan showed flashes of good
fielding yesterday, but for the most
part fell far below the Maroons in this
respect, being charged with four er-
rors while several other plays were
a bit "off color". T-ruskowski, who
substituted for Davis behind the bat,
was responsible for one misplay and
two other throws that were shady.
Two well executed double-plays brigh-
tened the work of the Wolverines con-
siderably.
Colgate started off the scoring in
the second inning. After Hopkins
struck out, Bollerman walked and took
third following Jones' texas league
single to left field. Cardner struck out,
but Latham doubled to left sending In
Bollerman and Jones. Gilmartin is-
sued another base on balls, to Welch,
after which Briggs doubled to right,
I scoring Latham and Welch. Richard-
son reached first on Weintraub's wide
throw and Bridges scored. Steinberg
grounded out to end the inning.
The Michigan scores came in the
second and fifth innings. Corriden
struck out to open the second. Puck-
elwartz singled to right and stole
second. Kubicek struck out. The
Michigan captain then scored on
Oosterbaan's cutting single to center
field. The other score came after
Hopkins attempted to take a. piece out
of the front of Oosterbaan's shirt.
The big first baseman went to third
SafterDavis' out, and scored ona wide
pitch that eluded the Colgate catcher.

L

'1

IL~ VI u 1llG ~ UG }tempt of Captains Nungesser and
Atachafalaya basin, was not in dlanger tmp fCpan ugse n
A Coli has fired other French fliers with
of being flooded. The breaks were 130 the ambition to make the Paris-New
and 170 miles above New Orleans and York flight. Officials of the Levasseur
on the opposite side of the rivefromAirplane company, which built the
this city. '"White Bird" say they have been ap-
Port Barre Is Under Water proached during the week by several
Port Barre, on the western edge of well known French pilots eager for
backwaters from the Melville crevasse financial support in order to brave the
was under six iches of water, wic Atlantic. However, until the fate of
was rising rapidly. Residents were Nungesser is known, it is not likely
being evacuated over the Texas and the construction company will plan
Pacific although the tracks in the thyconstructios-Aomptmcyewilltplan
vicinity of the town were under any further trans-Atlantic expedition.
water..Bertud Obtains Injunction
Towns directly in the path of the eNEW YORK May 18-Lloyd W.
flood were being evacuated more INBertaud obtaied a temporary in-
readily as news spread of the disas- u dtotaedy agtCoary in-
trous effects of the waters to the jetion late today against Charles A.
north. Levine to restrain him from supplant-
'Krotz Springs, already under a foot injg Bertaud as co-pilot and navigator;
and a half of water, had been de- of the Ballanca airplane "Columbia"I
serted. , on the proposed non-stop flight from
sRtned. nNew York to Paris.

were being jammed with refugees.
Quarters at Lafayette were being ex-j
tended to care for the influx expected j
as the flood sweeps down the valley.l
Food and clothing became a prob-
lem at the Opelousas camp. A truck-(
load of bread was carried there while 1
women busied themselves making cof-
fee and sandwiches in their homes
after equipment at the ca.mp proved
inadequate to take care of the food
demand.I
At Baton Rouge Secretary Hoover.
formulated plans for redistribution of
the government's rescue fleet intot
the southern Louisiana territory, lat-
er leaving by train for Torras where
he boarded the coastguard tug Fai-
kee to continue his inspection of the
area.
The Mississippi fell slowly along the
lower river, the weather bureau at,
New Orleans estimating that half of
' the water from the Tensas basin was
being diverted into the Atachafalaya
basin through the Melville and Bayou
DesGlaise crevasses. The crest of the
flood, it reported, still was in the Ten-
sas basin far above Bayou DesGlaises.
HOLD ART EXHIBIT
Paintings by some of the leading
artists of contemporary America, se-
lected from the Thirty-Ninth Annual
American exhibition held in the Art

With the Ballanca plane held up
by the court's action continued in-
clement weather oven the Atlantic as
reported late toddy prevented any
possibility of either Commander Rich-
ard Byrd or Captain Carles Lind-
burgh hopping off tomorrow morning.
The temporary injunction and order -
to show cause issued to Bertaud was
granted by Justice Mitchell May in the
supreme court in Brooklyn on applica-
tion by the pilot's attorney, Leo T.-
Kissam. The order, returnable next
Friday afternoon, was directed against
the Columbia Aircraft corporation,
builders of the "Columbia", and
Charles A. Levine, as the corporation's
managing director.
Cannot Break Contract
The injunction restrains the de-
fendant from breaking an alleged con-
Itract made May 12, by which Bertaud
and Clarence B. Chamberlain were to
be allowed to fly the Ballanca plane to
Paris and also from substituting any
pilots for them.
Bertaud claims that Levine is at-
tempting to break the contract, and in
an affidavit attached to the applica-
tion for the injunction. Kissam stated
that he spoke to Levine and that the
latter said to him:
"Thie flight will go on all right. but
Bertaud will be out of it. I will have
nothing more to do with Bertaud.".
Although Byrd's plane could not be
Inut through its final naces in the air

E
I
.
, :
'I i
, .
j
I,
C(
f
.
.
3
r;
i
1
'i
;
3
P,
r

The box score:
Michigan AB
Nebelung, rf.......4
Weintraub, 3b....4+
Morse, ss ..........4
Corriden, if ........4
Puckelwartz, cf ....3
Kubicek, 2b ........4
Oosterbaan, lb ....2
Davis, c ............2
Truskowski, c.....1
Gilmartin, p.......d
Lowe, p ............1-
Reutz, p ...........2
Totals...........31
Colgate AB

R
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
R
1
2
2
0,
1
3
2
0
0
1

H.
0
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
H
2
3
2
2
2
0
4
0
0
2

Pa
1
2
2
0
1
4
10
3
4
0
0
0

A
10
3
2
0
0
1
0
1
2
1
2
1

E
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
4
4
E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Welch, cf ..........5
Bridges, 3b ........5
Richardson, 2b ......4
Steinberg, ss ......5
Hopkins, p........5
Bollerman, lb ......2
Jones, c..........4
Cardner, rf .........4
Hirt, rf ............1
Latham, if .........5

27 13
PO A
2 0
2 1
1 0
1 5
1 2
9 0
9 1
0 0
0 0
2 0

Totals ..........40 12 17 27 9 1.
Colgate ..............050 000 205-12
Michigan ............010 010 000- 2
Summary:
Two-base hits-Bridges. Steinberg.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan