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May 17, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-17

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v

ESTABLISHED
1890

itt

~~UiII

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVIL NO. 164

EIGHT PAGES,

ANN ARDOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 17, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

- I

BUNCHED HITS D0EFAT
IOWA AS WOLVERINES
DRIVE TOWARDS TITLE
3ICIIIGAN PLA YS ERIORLESS'
BALL IN OVERCOMI4NG,
IIAWFEYJ, SQU;AD
MILLER PITWHES VICTORY
name Was I Danger At No Time
After Corrien Scored In The Se-
ond Inning On Puckelwartz' Hit
(Special to Tlg Daily)
By Daily Iowan Sports Editor
IOWA CITY, Iowa, May 16.-"Iron-
man" Miller and a fighting pack of
Wolverines continuedtheir upward
climb her~ today when they de-
feated the l1awkeyes 6-0. It was the .
third victory within a week for the
big twirler. The last two have been
shutout games against the two lead-
ing conference teams, Illinois and
Iowa.
At no time were the Wolverines in
danger due to the 'masterly pitching
' of Miller, the errorless ball of the
whole team, and the ,bunching of hits
when hits meant runs. They scored
once in the second, third, and fifth
and three times in a ninth inning
rally, staged merely for the fun of
the thing.
After the uneventful first , inning,
Corriden started the second with a
double and scored when Puckelwartz
singled. Kubicek then proceeded to
hit into a double play and Oosterbaan
retired the side when he poled out a
tall one to the right fielder.
In the third the only Iowa erro of
the game, a man hit by the Hawk
pitcher, two sacrifices, and a walk
were responsible for one run' before
Nieblung was caught off second.
Davis playing a fast game as catch-
or, started the fifth with a bingle
over shorty Miller sacrificed. Nie-.
blung popped to the first baseman.
Weintraub tripled to bring Davis
home for one of the three scores he
made during the game. Morse re-
tired the side when he grounded out
to first. '
As if they had planned the rally
before, knowing it was unnecessary, the
Wolverines then stepped into the
ninth. Puckelwartz hit through first.
Kubicek fouled ou-t to the catcher.
A run came in as Oosterbaan singled
Davis doubled to score the captain-
elect of football. Miller singled and
Mulroney was pulled from the box,.
It was the first defeat of the season
for the star hurler. Nieblung fanned.
Weintraub hit through third to score
Davis. For the third time during the
game Morsewent ou by knocking to
the first baseman.
The score stood 6-0 as Kubicek
caught a line drive for a double out,
killing Iowa's chances for scoring.
B~ox score:!
ichilgis.(6) AB R H PO A El
Nieblung,rf........4 0 0 1 0 0
Weintraub,3b....... 3 0 2 0 2 01
Morse, ss ...........40021 0
Corriden, If........4 1 1 3 0 0
Puckelwartz, c, f .. 3 1 1 2 0 0
Kubicek, 2b........ 4 0 0 3 2 0
Oosterbaan, lb .... 4 1 1 7 0
Davis, c...........3 3 2 9 0 0
Miller, p .......... 2 0 1 0 3 0
Totals 31 6 8 27 8 0

NEW PUBLICATION
ELICITS PRA IS E
F O R FIRST ISSUE
Many favorable reports on the sam-
ple copy of The Michigan Weekly, dis-
tributed with The Daily last Friday,
are coming in daily, in response to
cards sent out by the business staff, it
was announced yesterday by George
H. Annable, '28, business manager.
The subscriptions are also selling well
and it is expected that the subscrip-.
tion quota will soon be filled.
Sample copies have been sent to
high schools throughout the state and
all freshmen who are entering in the
fall a.re to be sent a copy. Families
are expected to be among the readers
of The Weekly.
Subscriptions will be accepted
daily from now until the end of the
semester at The Daily office in the
Press building. The subscription price
for one year is $1.25.
ROUGH WILL ADDRESS
COSMOPOLITAN GROUP
Detroit Minister Is One of Leaders
Of Endeavor For Better Under.
standing of International Spirit
BANQUET TO BE TONIGHT
Dr. Lynn Harold Hough, pastor of
the Central Methodist Episcopal
church of Detroit, will deliver the
principal address at the annual ban-
quet of the Cosmopolitan club which
will be held at 6 o'clock tonight at the
Presbyterian church. The subject
of his address will be "A League of
Friendly Minds."
Dr. Hough is one of the leading
ministers of the United States accord-
ing to officers of the Cosmopolitan
club. He has for some time been a
leader in the movement for a better
understanding of the cosmopolitan
spirit, and it was for this reason that
the club chose him as the speaker
of the evening.
In 1919 and 1920 Dr. Hough was
president of Northwestern univer-
sity. He is a contributor to many of
the leading magazines of the United
States and has written many books on
theological subjects as well as those
having to do with life and manners
of living. He has traveled extensive-
ly, delivering lectures in all parts of
the world. In 1918 he was lecturer
for the Lindgren foundation of North-
western university and lectured in
many parts of Europe on the moral
and spiritual aims of the World
War.
Following Dr. Hough's address the
new officers of the club will be in-
stalled: They are: Raja F. Howrani,
'28, vice-president, William H1. Mc-
'28, vice-president, William E. M-
Clre, '28, secretary; Dr. J. A. C.
Hildner, faculty treasurer; Alexis
Lapteff, '30A, treasurer; P. K. Lee,
'28 and Donato Syat, '28Ed, mem-
bers of the board of directors.
PLANS MADE FOR
MOCK ELECTIONS
Senior class mock elections to
choose the recipients of the tradi-
tional left-handed class honors will
be held at 4:15 Wednesday afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
Henry S. Maentz has announced that
the following titles will be balloted
for: most bashful boy, class baby,
class bluffer, class handshaker, big-
gest line, woman with the biggest
line, class politician, class vamp, most
popular girl, biggest woman hater,
most bashful ,girl, best student, best
woman student, and class athlete. At
a late hour last night it had not been
decided if the class shiek would be
picked at these elections.

DRIVING PERMITS
MUST BE SECURED
Students who have not yet obtained
their driving permits must call for
them by Saturday, May 21, according

ARR1ANGEMENTS MADE
FOR TOPENING ofMAY
FESTIVALTOMOB1RRO
SCIIU3ANN-IIEINK WILL ARRIVE
IN ANN ARBRTOD YFOR
:34111CO NCERT UE~R~~~S
MOORE MANAGES AFFAIR
,Array Of Artists, Group Organizations
Scheduled To Appear On
Programs
With the arrival of Madame Ernes-
tine Schuman-Heink some time to-
day, everything will be in readiness
for the opening of the 34th annual
May Festival, sponsored by the Choral
.Union and the University School of
Music, which will be held tomorrow,
Thursday, Friday andl Saturday in
Hill auditorium. The festival, as in
former years, will consist of six
concerts, including matinees on Fri-
day and Saturday afternoons.
Thursday night's program, former-
ly planned as a memorial to Beeth-
oven, will be revised, and numbers
substituted which will make the pro-
gram appropriate as a memorial to
the late Prof. Francis W. Ke Jy, and
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, whose deaths
the campus is mourning. The funeral
march from Beethoven's "Eroica Sym-
phony" will be played..
Plans Made For Months
Plans have been under way for
months past by Earl V. Moore, direc-
tor, and Charles A. Sink, business
manager, to insure the success of this
year's festival. The array of artists
apd group organizations that has been
secured is thought by those in charge
to exceed in brilliance that of other
years. All tickets, both course and
singles, excepting those in the second.
balcony, have already been sold out
for the performances.
Two events oft extreme importance
will particularly distinguish this
year's Festival, according to Mr.
Moore. These are the appearance
of Madame Schumann-Heink, now i
I her fiftieth year of concert singing,
and the selection of the local event
for the celebration of the Beethoven
centennial observance, by the national
committee, for the Beethoven cen-
tenary anniversary.
Madam~e Schumann-Heink will sing I
at the first concert tomorrow night,
and will be accompanied by the Chi-
cago Symphony orchestra, under the
direction of Frederick Stock. Mad-
ame Schumann-Heink will sing num-
hers by Wagner, and a group of mis-
cellaneous songs.
Manson To Conduct
Howard Hanson, musical director of
the Eastman school of music, IRoches-
ter, N. Y., will act as guest conductor
of the orchestra at this first concert.
His "Lament For Beowulf" was among
the larger numbers presented at the
Festival last year. He was also com-
missioned by the national committee
to write the "Heroic Elegy," the first
performance of which will take place
tomorrow night. Other numbers which
will be presented by the orchestra
wil incude the Beethv e m-'
phony number seven in A major and
Tschaikowsky's Finale from the 4th
Symphony.
ENGINEER AUTHOR
WILL TALK TODAYJ
"Mechanical Ideas in Electricity"
will be the subject upon which Prof.
W. S. Franklin of the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology will
speak ats8 p. m., today in the Natural I
f Science auditorium.
Prof. Franklin is an authority on 1
the subject of elechrical engineering'
according to members of the faculty
here and has collaborated with other

I authors in writing several books on
the subject. The paper will be illus-
trated with mechanical models.
Members of the Detroit-Ann Arbor
Section of the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers will attend the
lecture as guests of the University
and will attend a dinner at 6:15 at j

SIGMA DELTA CHI
INITIATES S E V E N
INTO FRATERNITY
Seven new men were admitted to
membershipi in Sigma Delta Chi,,
national journalistic fraternity, at the
regular initiation banquet held last
night at the Union following the intia-
tion ceremony given yesterday after-
noon. The new members are Am-
brose J. Maxwell, Spec., Kenneth G.
Patrick, '29, Herbert E. Vedder, '28,
Nelson J. Smith, Jr., '29, Archie W.
Robinson, '27, Paul 1. Kern, '29, and
J. Stewart Hooker, '29.
Addresses were heard from T. Haw-
ley Tapping, '16, past national presi-
dent of the fraternity, and Frank
Reck, national secretary and assistant
managing editor of the American Boy
Magazine. Mr. Reck outlined the or-
ganization of the fraternity as a na-
tional institution, and Mr. Tapping
mentioned its chief activities.
Professor John L. Brumm, head of
the journalism department, pointed
to the methods by which Sigma Delta
Chi could be of assistance to the de-
nartment by cooperation. Howard P.
Jones of the journalism department,
spoke also.
Speeches were also given by Cal-
vin Patterson, '27 retiring president,
and Archie W. Robinson, '27, on be-
half of the incoming members. The
banquet was presided over by Court-
land C. Smith, '28, president.
SERVCES[OR KELSEY
WILL B HELD UTODAY
Rev. Merle H. Anderson Will Officiate;
Burial To Take Place At
Forest Hill Cemetry
TO BE OPEN TO FRIENDSJ
Funeral services for Prof. F. W.
Relsey of the Latin department of thee
University who passed away sudden-I
ly Saturday afternoon will be held at
4 o'clock today at the First Presby-
terian church, and will be open to

HIAV WINDS PVIIENT
PROPOSED TRIALS FOR
PARIS FLIGHT PLANES
UNFAVORABLE WEATHER KEEPS
TRANS-ASLANTI'MACHINES
IN THEIR IIA NGARS
FRENCH ACES STILL LOST

Fate Of Nungesser And Coli,
Week Overdue, Is Mystery
Search Progresses

NowI
As

MICHIGAMUA ON
WARPATH: SEEK
NEW PALEFACES
When from out the paleface Wigwam
From behind the staring no )n face
Come the slow and solemn five b~oomns
Telling that the Evening spirit
Wanders over woods and lmeadows,
Lights the campfires of the heavens,'
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their warpaint
Soon will gather round the oak tree
Eouil the oak tree called the Tappan
There to greet the trembling paleface.
Many in number wait the bibling
Of the loud rejoicing redskins,'
For before they take the long trail
To the home of Michigamua
Many trials and many tortures
Pirst must prove their, strength and
conurage
Ere the red man bids them welcome
'Ere he calls each paleface "Indian,
'Ere the peace-pipe smoke goes sky-
ward.
MISSSSPI LOD
THREATENNEWAREAS'
Levees At Woodlife, 114) . Miles . From
New Orleans, Falliniw Rushing
3fMihines To Scene

(By Associated Press)
MINEOLA, N. Y., May 10-Brewing
storms, both atmospheric and verbal,
kept the trans-Atlantic planes in their
hangars today.
Strong squally winds, swept the fly-
ing fields all day so that projected
local test flights had to be abandon-
ed.
Combination of wind and dissension
prevented another longer flight that
had been announced at noon for this
afternoon.
During the morning, the crews of
all three planes which plan the Paris
hop, worked around the hangars, and
an air of peace settled over the camp
with the report that dissension of
1firs andtb hakr of fli B RllnoI

flight had been smoothed out to the LOSS OF FE REPORTED
satisfaction of all.
Byrd Plans 'rest (By Associated Press)
Commander Richard E. Byrd an- NEW ORLEANS, May 16- A new
nounced that his giant Fokker threat had arisen tonight as the Mis-
"America" would go up during the sissippi flood rolled clown upon the
day with a 12,000 pound load. which five parishes in its path through the
is 2,000 pounds below the weight to I Atachafalaya to the Gulf of Mexico
be carried on the hop off. While hundreds of persons were re-j
G. M. Ballanca, designer of the ported clinging precariously to house-
plane in which Clarence Chamber- tops and tree tops in the water rid-
lain and Lloyd Bertaud will fly to den parishes west of the Atachafalaya,
France, stated that his monoplane engineers received the information
probably would fly to Washington that levees along the east bank of the
and back during the day to test in- Atachafalaya were caving before the
struments. He said that both fliers tremendous pressure exerted by the
had agreed such a test was necessary. stream.
Weather Unfavorable At Woodlife, ten miles south of the
The four o'clock weather report junction of Old and Atachafalaya riv-
given the fliers by the weather bureau ers, approximately 140 miles west of
precluded all reasonable chance of New Orleans on the opposite side of
their getting away tomorrow and in- the Mississippi, the enbankments were
dicated that favorable weather could i said to he falling, and efforts were
not be expected for at least two days. being made to get levee machines and
1pile drivers to the scene. A break.
ST. JOHNS, N. F., May 16-Although there would loose the waters into
a full week has passed since the day l Pointe Couke and the other parishes
Captains Charles Nungesser and between the Atachafalaya and the west

friends instead of private, as an-
nounced yesterday. Rev. Merle H. An-
derson, pastor, will officiate. Burial
will take place immediately afterward
at Forest Hill cemetery.
Pallbearers for the burial services
are: Prof. H. A. Sanders of the Latin
department, Prof. H. L. Wilgus of the
law school, Dr. Warren P. Lombard,
professor emeritus of physiology, and
Herbert P. Watts of Adrian, a mem-
ber of Dr. Kelsey's undergraduate fra-
ternity.
Mrs. Kelsey who was returning from
California at the time of Is death, ar-
rived in Ann Arbor last night.
PRESIIENT LITTLE AND C. A. SINK
EI'IA)GIZE MEMOR OF KELSEY
"Franeis W. Kelsey will remain
in the memory of all who knew
' him as a tremendous source of
enthusiasm and energy, in the en-
couragement 'of creative scholar-
ship wherever he found it.
"Combining in a rare degree
with tact pertinacity, broad vis-
ion with a mastery of detail, and
high executive ability with vivid
and inspiring imaginaton, he has
served for almost forty years as
a wise counsellor and loyal friend
to hundreds of Michigan students
and as a commanding figure na-
tionally and internationally rec'og-
nized among scholars in his chos-
Sen field.
Original, vigorous-ever build-
ing, planning organizing, his life
was so interwoven with that of the
University that his place was pe-
culiarly his own, and no future
circumstance can ever destroy or
modify the impress of his strength
and individuality."
C. C, Little
"Dr. Kelsey was not only one of
the outstanding men on the Uni.
versity faculty, but was of nation.
al and international prominence
in the field of archaeology. His
great success was due not only to
his professional ability but to his
deep knowledge of world affairs
and his understanding of human
nature. He was a great adminis-
trator in all stages of his life
work.
"As president of the University

.
.
l{
!
3
i
C
i
.
i
E
.,

AP NIGHT CEREMONY
TO BE HELD TONIGHT
ON FERRYFIELD SITE
VARSITY RAND WILL LEAD MEN
OF '30)TO ) B4NIRE AT
7 O'LOC
NO FREE MOVIE PLANNED
Lloyd's Death 'auses Abandonment Of
Program; Site Changed Due To
Dr. Ilayne's Request
Cap Night, the traditional event at
which the members of the freshman
class cast into the fire the emblems of
their servitude and ascend into the
ranks of the sophomores, will be held
tonight. The freshmen will assemble
in front of the Union at 7 o'clock and
will snake-dance down State street be-
hind the Varsity band.
Arriving at the field they will
snake-dance before the huge bonfire
that will be built, will give yells for
the class of '30 and then to the tune
of "Where, Oh Where Are the Ver-
dant Freshmen" will cast their pots
into the fire and leave the field as
official members of the sophomore
class.
Ceremony Abandoned
-The Student council has deemed it
advisable this year, it was stated, be-
cause of the death of Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd of the Graduate school, to do
away with most of the ceremony sur-
rounding the event. Plans had been
made to have a student speaker, a
members of the faculty, and a speakr
from the alumni, in addition to the
regular distribution of the "M"
blankets to members of the athletic
squad. These plans were cancelled
with th consent of officials of the Uni-
versity.
South Ferry lfield, the sicene of
many of the class battles of former
years, was chosen as the scene of
the event at the requst of Dr. Harley
A. Haynes, director of the University
hospital, because of the proximity of
Sleepy hollow, traditional "stamping
ground" of the freshman class, to the
hospita. Each year, according to Dr.
Haynes, the noise of the event has
become troublesome to patients and
attendants of the hospital and for
this reason it was thought advisable
to move the evient to a difierent
place.
Is Old Tradition
Cap Night is one of the oldest tra-
ditional events on the canpus. TWis
year the program has been changed
due to circumstances. Next year the
program will be given as in previous
years, according to members of the
Student council.
A free movie for the participants,
procured according to custom by
Gerald Hoag, manager of the Majes-
tic theater on behalf of the Butter-
field theaters, will not betused. Hill
auditorium is being used tonight' for
rehearsal by members of the staff of
artists who will open with the an-
nual May Festival there tomorrow,
and the seating capacity of the two
main theaters on the campus does not
enable the managements to tender a
free show in these houses.
DEAN WILL TALK
TO FUTURE LAW
STUDENTS TODAY
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
School will give a lecture to prospec-
tive law students at 4:10 o'clock this
afternoon in room 25, Angell hall. The
rubject of the lecture will be "The
Profession of Law," and the talk will
outline the work doie by students in
the Law School, the advantages of an

education in la,, and theopportuni-
ties offered to law students after grad-
uation.
Dean Bates received a bachelor of
philosophy degree at Michigan in 1890,
a degree of bachelor of laws at North--
western university, in 1892, and a de-
gree of doctor of laws at Kalamazoo
college in 1925. After his graduation
from Nortlhwestern university, Dean
Bates practiced law as a member of
the law firm of Harlan and Bates, at
Chicago, until 1903, when he. became
Tappan professor of law at the Uni-
versity. In 1910 he was appointed to
his present position of dean of the
Law School.
CONFERENCE RESULTS
Wisconsin 1. Illinois 0.
Northwestern 3, IndIana 2.
Purdue 4, Ohio State 2.

Francois Coli, French trans-Atlantic
fliers, were expected to reach this
side of the ocean on the non-stop.
flight from Paris to New York, the
fate of the aviators tonight remained
a mystery.
ANNOUNCE FINAL
DAY FOR FAVORS
Distribution of favors for the Senior
ball, to be held May 20 in the Union,
ball room, will continue from 1 to 5:30

bank of the Mississippi.
Rescue work was proceeding rapid-
ly in the Bayou DesGlaises sector
with surf boats plying through the
crevasse ranids to remove men strand-
ed upon high spots in the section. Al-
ready the waters had moved 25 miles
down the Atachafalaya basin, milling
into an ever-spreadling. lake which
climbed slowly up toward the top of
stationary objects.
At Plaucheville the current was so
strong that it overturned large houses
and smaller ones collapsed before the

lowa (0)
Terry, rf....... ..
McNabb, 2b.......
Hoben, lb........
Smith, cf........
Beardsley, If
Classgow, ss....
Gibbs, 3b.........
Blackford, 3b......
Thompson, c......
Broders, c........
Mulroney, p......
Corbin, V........
Twogood, * .--.-.-

AB R
4 0
4 0
4 0
3 0
30
3 0
2 0
1 0
1 0
2 0
2 0
0 0
0 0

H
0
1
0
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

PO
3
21
11
3
3
1
0
0
4
0'
0
0
0

A E
0 0
3 1
0 0
0 01
0 0
10 A
0 0
0 0"
3 0
0 0
0 0

o'clock this afternoon, according to an I flood like eggshells or rose with the
announcement made yesterday by waters to be carried a'long and pound-
Donald B. Doubleday, '27B.A., chair-) ed to pieces by waves.
man of the favors committee, who
stated this would be the final oppor-
tunity to obtain them. Fifteen re-,FRAYER TO SPEAK
maining tickets will also be placed on OF CAMPUS WQRK
general sale at the same desk.t
Bronze galleon model ship book Professor William A. Prayer, of
ends have been selected by the corn- the history department, will address
mittee as the favors for this year's the University of Michigan club of
annual Senior class dance. A small St. Louis on Friday, May 20. It is
inlaid Michigan seal will adorn the expected that he will speak on the
book ends. campus activities in which he is per-
sonally, interested. He is in charge
'W OOD TO ADDRESS of freshman week at the University,
i I is on the Board ini Control of Athlet-
S OC I A L WORKERS ics,"and is connected with President
P o -Little's University program.
Professor A. E. Wood of the Sociol-
ogy department left yesterday to pre- ALPHA KAPPA PSI
sent a paper before a section of theA
National Conference of Social Work- FOUNDS CHAPTER
ers now meeting at Des Moines, Iowa.
Professor Wood's paper is on the sub- The Michigan chapter of Alpha Kap-
ject, "Progress for Research in Crim- pa Psi, national professional business3
inology" and will be delivered in a administration fraternity, was install-
conference on delinquents and their ed yesterday at the Union. Twenty-
correction, three students and six members of the!
This conference which meets an- faculty of the University were select-
nually has an attendance of over three ed to form the nucleus of this new
thousand social workers, assembling chapter, the forty-seventh to be in-
from all parts of the country. stalled into the fraternity.
UNI VERSITY SENATE CHANGES PLAN
GOVERNING DIREC TORSHIPS OF UNION

Totals 29.0 5 27 7 1
*Twogood batted for Smith in 5th.
Score by innings:
Mighigan............011 010 093-6'
Iowa .................000 000 000-0
Summary-Three base hits, Wein-
trub; Two base hits, Corriden, Davis;
Walked by Mulroney 3; by Miller 1;
Struck out by Mulroney 1. Corbin 1,'
Miller 7; Double plays, Glassgow to1
McNabb to Hoben; passed ball, Brod-1
ers; hit by pitcher Mulroney (Neib-
lung);' by Miller (Mulroney).
Umpires-Schuler and Cleary.
Time-1: 46.
S. C, A, TO ASK
CHARTER REVISION
Announcement was made yesterday
by George H. Likert, '27, president of
the Student Christian Association for

to Dean
who fail
privilege
semester,
out with
semester.

Joseph A. Bursley. Those the Union.
to do so will be denied the=
of a perfit for the Fall PENN
as was the policy carried totaling f
h negligent students last granted to

STATE. - Appropriations
our millions have been
the university by the leg-

islature.

CONSTRUCTION WORK ON MUSEUM

IS AHEAD OF CONTRACT SCHEDULE "Music society from 1889 to the
present, his untiring efforts havef
been largely responsible for the
Construction work on the flew mu- I The work of moving into the new l success of the University School of
seumiat the corner of Washtenaw andu se and of tes Music and the May Festival con-
South University avenues is several I preparing exh ts certs, through his wise judgement
days ahead of schedule according to e egun as soon as it is prac- and broad vision regarding true4
the contractor's report for last week. ticable. With good luck, according to artistic values. His sympathetic
Slight delays in connection with the, Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, director of and cordial manner made him ao

At the fourth regular meeting of the
University Senate for the year 1926-
27; held yesterday afternoon in Room
C of the law building, a resolution
was adopted that hereafter, at the
election of Senate members to direc-
torships of the Union, three members
should be elected for periods of three,
two, and one years respectively, the

year, Dean Henry Bates, of the Law
School.
Following the election of the direc-
tors, the regular annual report of the
Board insControl of Student Publica-
tions was read by Prof. Morris P.
Tilley, of the English department.
The report summarized the work of
the board for the year.
A report was read by Prof. William

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