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May 11, 1927 - Image 12

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Text
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The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-11

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oAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESD:AY, MAY 11, 1927

I U ______________________________________

Published every . morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Contrel of Student Publications.
Memb.ers of,,Westera Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited, to it or not otherwise
credted in this papertand the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the ostoffics at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
ef postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mnaster General.
f4Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by Snail,
4.OO
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
ard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; TBusiness a1214.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADYJR.
Editor.........W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor...............Irwin A. Olian
News Editors.........., Frederick Shillito
}Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor...........Marion Kubik
S port. Editor ............ Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor..... .....Morris Zwerdling
Musio and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall. Jr.
Might Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Carton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
Jamaes Herald Cassani A. Wilson
Assistant :City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnaws
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters

Mlgarion Andersn J
Margaret Arthur
)eaR Campbel
Jessie Church
t hester E. Clark
Edward C. Ctimmings
Margaret Clarke
lsiancnard W. Cleland
Clarence Edelson
William Emery
Robert E. Finch
J. Martin Frissel
obert Gessner
Margaret Gross
Elaine Gruber
Coleman . Glecer
EFarvey J.Gunderson
Stewart ooker
Morton B. Icove

Milton Kirshbaum
PaA Kern
Sally Knox
Richard Kurviak.
G. Thomas McKean
Kenneth Patrick
Mary Ptolemy
Ivut r&5$Quinn
,james Sheehan
Sylvia Stone
Mary Louise Taylor
Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
William Thurnau
Mvarian Welles
Thaddeus Wasielewski
Sherwood Winslow
Herbertr. Vedder
Milford Vanik

four days after the unsatisfactory re-
ply was received from the latter. Un-
til China's political situation becomes
clarified, then, the policy of deferred
action has become the only sane and I
practical conclusion.
British recognition of this fact in-
sures the Chinese freedom to fight out
their difficulties, and, perhaps, 'to es-
tablish a central governmentswithout'
the intervention of outside powers. As
such, it also means that the Coolidge
policy toward China has been victor-
ious, and that the Uniited States has
gained another point in the leadership
of world politics.
THE IRON HAND
Mexico, turbulent sore spot on the
otherwise peaceful continent of North
America, has apparently found its
master. Revolts are to be outlawed;
the arrogance of the Catholic church
is to be suppressed, and not only are
Mexicans allowing this to happen but
they are cooperating.
There comes a time in the life of
every weak government when a man
reaches the helm who can not be in-
timidated, and who can master the
situation. Germany had its Bismarck,
Italy its Mussolini, and Mexico today
has its Calles.
The odds that the president of the
Mexican republic faces are immense.
Thp organized Catholicism of Mexico
and the world oppose him. In the
face of this, Calles, the iron hand of
Mexico, proceeds and is apparently
succeeding in freeing his country
from the shackles of reactionary in-
stitutions.
Already his armies are in the field,
and General Obregon is now organiz-
ing a separate force of 20,000 for the
battle to the finish. Train outrages
and banditry are to fnd at all posts;
and methods which are high handed
become justifiable in opposing bigotry.
Calles himself must take care, how-
ever, lest he become drunk with the
power that is apparently his. To con-
trol the press, the government, the
army, and even the lives of a nation
is a position of tremendous power, and
one which is capable of misuse as well
as achievement. So far there is noth-
ing to suggest this misuse. Calfa
seems strong enough to suppress the
degenerate rebels and this is an entire-
ly worthy cause; if he remains sane
and returns the power he has assumed
to the sovereign people of the state
when he is finished using it in their
defense, he will be a savior of his
people, and the greatest man Mexico
has ever produced; if he fails in this
trust, however, he will go to-that in-
evitable doom of the ruthless dictator
-the doom of complete defeat
After vainly trying to filnd some
Chinese faction which it might hold
responsible for the Nanking outrages,
England has decided that pressure
really shouldn't be brought to bear
on the Chinese.

* * *

# i

It is therefore our honor and privi-
lege to announce the establishment of
the WILLIAM HERBERT HOBBS
FOUNDATION FOR TIlE BENEFIT
'OF TIIE S. C. A. FRESf AII CAMP.
* * *
The basis of this Foundation will be
the Rolls' Stadium Bond fund which
collected $1.14 last Fall toward the
purchase of a bond in order to put
two representative students in seats
on the fifty yard line.
* * *
All through the year we have been
trying to find something to donate the
Fund to, and never succeeded. Now
we feel that here is a crying needj
which ought to be filled by Rolls.
* * *
There will be absolutely no strings
attached to The Hobbs Foundation!
gift to the camp-no statue of the
geology expert will be crected by the
terms of the donation, nor will it be
necesgary for the S. C. A. to put up
a rifle range in order to receive the
fund.
* * *
We are sure that Professor Hobbs
would like the gift to be made without
any flourish what-so-ever, because he
is a quiet man, and, while there is
distinctly no "negative' characteristics
about him, still he doesn't like pub-
licity.
Since the authority on geology is
now on his way to Greenland, he will
not be able to take part in the cere-
monies at the time of the donation,'
I but we are sure that he will be willing
to broadcast a nice speech over the
radio at that time.
* * 0
TODAY'S THE DAY

ROLL
Professor.hobbs has failed the S. C.
A. Ile refusedl to contribute to their
Fresh Air camp, for reasons which he
has broadcast recently, and so we feel
that in some manner this loss must be
made up.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGERt
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Contracts................William C. Pusch
Copywriting.........Thomas E. Sunderland
Local Advertising...George H. Annable, Jr.
Foreign Advertising ...... Laurence Van Tuyl
Circulation . ........T. Kenneth Haven
Publication.............John H. Bobrink
Accounts............... Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
Beatrice Greenberg George Ahn, Jr.
Selma Jensen Florence Cooper
MIarion L. Reeding A. M. Hinklev
Marion Kerr E. L. pulse
Nance Solomon R. A. Meyer
Ralph L. Miller Harvey Talcott
John Russwinkle Harold Utley
ouglas Fuller Ray Wachter
Virle C. Witham Esther Booze
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1927.
Night Editor-ROBERT E. FINCH
VOTE TODAY!
Every student who registered
last week is entitled to cast a vote
in the all-campus elections today.
Voting is a right accorded only
to those who are adjudged worthy
of governing themselves; today,
the student body may prove its
ability for self-government by its
activity at the campus polls.
Pick the en for campus offices
whose ability or prevtous accomp-
lishments have demonstrated their
fitness to handle the work in-
volved. Cast your vote for the
best men so that campus self-gov-
ernment may be effective.
HIGh SCHOOL DEBATERS.
University students will once more
have the opportunity to accord a warm
welcome to a visiting delegation. In
the last few days the high school rep-
resentatives at the Michigan Inter-
scholastic Press association were en-
tertained in such a manner to leave
little doubt but that the prestige of
the University was increased through-
out the state. Tonight at the cham-
pionship high school debate between
Ann Arbor and Albion high schools,
another chance is offered for adding
to the high esteem in which the Uni-
versity is generally held.
Hundreds of high school students
from all over the state have signified
their intention of attending the final
contest in Hill auditorium. They will
come here with certain ideals of col-
lege life, eager to observe what itI
has to offer them in the future. The
manner of their reception by the Uni-
versity students is bound to affectl
their opinion of this institution, and
it is therefore both a privilege and ob-
Iigation to see that the visitors today
are granted a most cordial welcome.

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Music and Drama~
TIS AFTERNOON: .Dalles Frantz
will present a Twilight Organ Recital
11t 4:15 o'clock i hill auditorium.
TONIG lIT: Bessie Sickles, contral-
to, It a Students' Recital at 8 o'clock
in the School of Musle auditorium.
TONIGHT: The Rockford Players
will give the first performance of Wli.
Baim Archer's "The Green Goddess"
at :15 o'clock In Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall.

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PERSONAL ENGRAVED CARDS
FOR
COMMENCEMENT
_ -
Orders should be GRAHAM'S
placed now to
insure delivery At Both Ends of the Diagonal
II1I11111111111HIIII Hil f I 1111Hil l 11111111111111 111) 1 H l 111.11111IIHill I f1111I1

t
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CAMPUS OPINION7
Anonymous communications will lbe
disregarded. The names of commun-I
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

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ANOTHER REVIEW
To The Editor:
Last Wednesday "La Sonnette D'Al-
arme," a three-act comedy by Messrs.
M. Hennequin and R. Coolus was offer-
ed to us by the "Cercle FrAncais"
Players at the Mimes. The following
morning one could read in The Daily
a supposed review of the play, by a
supposed devotee of the stage and a
supposedly well-equipped amateur
critic. He thtught the production was
good because the French professors
and instructors "laughed." His lilli-
putian intelligence (or perhaps "spirit"
is a better word), hovered over the
audience for a few minutes, not notic-
ing what was happening on the stage,
giving but little attention to the actors'
demeanor, ignoriing the clearness of
their enunciation or their few defec-
tive but quite excusable mispronuncia-
tions, etc.
Mr. Bonnel, as a martyr of night-
clubs and of the wiles of a woman,
was really the most convincing actor
Ion the stage. Mr. Russell Reed showed
himself perhaps too parasitic, too
shoulder shrugging, not sufficiently
natural as a "gai viveur." Messrs.
Thomas Reed and Lee handled their
roles well. Mr. Meader, as the victim
of unrequited love, was persuasive.
We would have liked to see Mr. Thieme
more often: he was natural andhis
voice and his pronunciation were es-
pecially good. Mr. Fruhauf and Mr.
Hinkley played well.
Miss Tisch, as Simone, often lacked
expression, should have been more
ardent, and should have tried to show
less her desire to "lord" it over Boby 1
and his friends. Miss Burt was con-
vincing as the emancipated provincial.
Her pronunciation was excellent. Miss
Crampton overdid her part, burlesque-I
ing too much. but she deserves sincere

Exclusive Rolls photo shows the
freshman getting his first taste of col-
lege politics.
* * *
AN OPEN LETTER
Women's League,
Building Fund Committee:
I was surprised to note that you are
asking for money for a Women's
league building. How can you appeal
to students of this campus for money
aftferyou actually sold playing cards?
Tlink )of it: playing cards! I am
sur-rised that all these prominent
professors are backing a fund which
turned to the lowly gambler for money.
Why should we have a League build-
ing built out of playing cards? The
public ought to know the manner in
which your fund has been earned.
Would you want ministers contribut-
ing to a fund tnade up partly of the
weapons of the bridge table? I have
talked with some of your leaders, and
discovered that they were not willing
to discuss this weighty matter on the
public platform, and so you see that
they are afraid to face the isue.
I refuse to contribute to your fund.
So there!
--Professor Pugilistic,
* * *
A TAG FOR HOBBS
One of the pass-the-bucket boys in
the Fresh Air campaign yesterday re-
ported that a student dropped in a do-
nation and handed him this note:
"This is my second dollar today.
Please give the little red tag to Pro-
fessor Hobbs, His letters called it
forth."
** *
Along the same line, we understand
that Coach Steve Farrell, immediately
upon reading Professor Hobbs' letter
in The Daily, sent a five dollar check.
* * *
DOWN THE DIAGONAL
There were Cynical Seniors,
Silly Seniors, Sophisticated Sen-
iors-all kinds of Seniors at
Swing-out yesterday. And then
there were the engineers.
IT WAS ALMOST A SWING-OUT
WITH SLICKERS
Well, anyway, the rain held off long
enough for the engineers to have their
little fun on campus, when they hung
an effigy of a lawyer in cap and gown.

"THE INTIMATE STRANGERS"
A review, by Harian Welles
"I prefer to," said the adolescent
Johnnie White, as he hesitatingly took
Aunt Isabel Stuart's hand, and if it
wee not too great a pun, we would
like to take Aunt Isabel's hand, too,
and say "I prefer to." Aunt Isabel, a
most delightfully mocking and whim-
sical creature was such an intimate
character that all her little pranks
and schemes made her the confidente
not only of Johnny but of all
"inspired" people including most of
her audience.
The Hlendersonian program seemed
to place most of the emphasis upon
the flapper that broke God's mould
but while the flapper was consistent
and a complete balancing agent for
fifty or a hundred or even a thousand
maiden nieces and great nieces, still
the character of the wise and dear
Aunt Isabel was the dominating note
in "The Intimate Strangers." And
while it took the admirable Mr. Aimes
ten hours and thirty seven minutes
plus a chicken sandwich and a hard
boiled egg to get acquainted with the
lady, it took her audience something
like five minutes of passing conver-
sation between a station master with
a flat shiny goatee and the nephew of
the remarkable William Aimes, until
she entered the rather well-conceived
junction station, to know her per-
sonally.
To generalize, and according to
Plato, we achieve the real in the gene-
ral, "The Intimate Strangers" was
truly an intimate production, sym-
pathetically interpreted as if the play-
ers received as much enjoymente from
the playing as we, the audience, did
from looking on. It leads to the ob-
servation that oftentimesthe greatest
happiness comes from the smallest
things. The play is light and without
a doubt a child of the times probably
destined to end its existence with the
same times, but it has a spirit that
contributes to any age. "The Intimate
Strangers" is delicious fun worthy of
a personal appreciation rather than
criticism.
* **
COMEDY CLUB
Tryouts for membership in Comedy
Club wil be held this afternoon from
3 to 5 o'clock in Helen Newberry
auditorium.
* * *
THE REEN GODDESS
There are times when melodrama
becomes tiresome-gspecially in a sea-
son when most of the seasonal suc-
cesses have been of the type. Comedy
Club began with "The Last Warning"
-which had all the tumult and stri-
dent noise of the five and ten cent
mystery thriller. Later Mimes brought
forth Karel Capek's "R. U. R."-a
much better production, but one hard-
ly prosperous for the producers. And
the latest is "The Green Goddess," to
be done by the Rockford Players to-
night, Friday night and Saturday
night.
The Archer play, however, has some
exceptional characteristics which
should bring it above the level. It
varies the usual theatrical diet with
unnatural excitement and untommon
dramatic speed-a welcome fillip in
the theatrical round. And although
the nmelodrama has almost usurped
the professional stage this season-
forinstance, "Broadway," "The Spid-
er," "Crime," "Spread Eagle," "Set a
Thi'ek"-and "Fog"-nevertheless the
Players', production should be extraor-
dinarily good. Most of the good old
tricks rare used-seduction, torture,
murder . . . . down to the last
detail, but it makes excelent theatre,
as the saying goes.
* * .

TILE ORGAN RECITAL
Dalies Frantz, who has appeared in
numerous piano and organ recitals
during the year will replace Palmer
Christian at the organ in the Twilightt
Organ Recital this afternoon at 4:15
o'clock in Hill auditorium. He will
present the following program: a
Sonata V.................Guilmant
Allegro appasionata
Adagio
Scherzo

I YE,
AKE' - I'LL
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Cif, 770,,rjill--r

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CA MPUS

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FELT HAT SALE
We are closing out all Spring Hats
at special prices. Light shades,
snappy shapes. Quality equal to the
best.
We Clean and Block Hats
No Odor-No Gloss
Correct Shapes-No Burned Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415

Earn Extra Credits
During Summer Vacation
The change and recreation so necessary to every-
one are here combined with superior oppor-
tunity for educational advancement. Boating,
swimming, tennis, concerts, dramatic performan-
ces, inspiring lectures, etc.,areall available.
Organized excursions to industrial, financial and art
centers of Chicago. Courses covering full year's work
in General Chemistry, Physics or Zoology, for students
interested in MedicineDentistry or Engineering.
SUMMER
N® . SESSION
ON THE SHORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN
Opens June 27, 1927, and includes:
Graduate School Law School
College of Liberal Arts School of Music
School of Commerce Schoolof Speech
School of Education School of Journalism
Send for FREE Booklet
Booklet, "Education Plus Recreation." describes the
courses of NORTHWESTERlN UNIVYERSITY SUM.
MER SESSION and its rNcreational and educational
advantages.
Address WALTEBDILL Scorr, President
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
1Q04 Unversity Hall Evanston, Ill.
I i

The New Spring Brognes and
Lightweights are ready for
your inspection at
GUY WOOLFOLK
CO .
Exclusive Lasts and Patterns 0 1Q22
Designed and Sold Only by
WHITEHOUSE & HARDY.
BROADWAYAT 40'" STREET 144 WEST42"° STREET
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE BLDG. KNICKERBOCKER BUILDING
84 BROADWAY-AT WALL STREET
PHILADELPHIA-1511 CHESTNU' STREET

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--_- GRANGER'S
Dancing Tonight
8to,10
A very effective cooling system
keeps GRANGER'S ballroom
pleasantly cool for the Spring
dances. You will enjoy our dance
tonight.
Granger's Academy
Dancing: Wednesday, Friday, Saturdap

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G 'ET it all. Don't miss
any of it, the dizzy
lights and party-colored
frocks; steppirig to the
frenzied blare of saxo-
phones; senses tingling
with being alive and in
the midst of it all. And
next day-instructors who
are likable but exacting.

I

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BRITAIN WILL WAIT
After two weeks consideration, Eng-
land has decided to follow the lead of
the United States in holding up new
action on the Nanking outrages pend-
ing the internal political and miliary
developments in China.
This conclusion is merely a practicalj
rmecognation of the condition brought
on by the split in the Cantonese ranks
and the ejection of the radical ele-
hnent. As she intimates in her note
to the Cantonese foreign minister,

Ukulele
Complete with Self-
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Well-made; has exceptionally
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See them NOW!
BANJO-UKE
$5.00
Formerly priced at $5.50.
Get one now for summer. '
Free instruction ook in-
cluded. You can soon
learil to play the Banjo-
Uke.

To get the most out of college you must be
full of vitality, must have every nerve and
muscle working full time. Right food is the
key to it. The Shredded Wheat habit will
help you to make mind and body alert and
throw off the poisons that bring sluggish-
ness. You'll like it, too. It's appetizing
eaten half a hundred ways; smothered in
fruit and cream or toasted with butter
and hot milk are just two of them.
THE SHREDDED WHEAT COMPANY
Niagara Falls, N. Y.

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