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May 11, 1927 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

XTRA

4jitg

L111l

EXTRA

r--°--°

VOL. XXXVIL No. 159

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ALL SCHOOLS TD VOTE TODAY1
IN ANNIUAL CAMPUS ELECTIONS
T O C HOOS E STUDOE NT O FFICERS

WHERE TO VOTE TODAI

Y.

Lits: In front of Library.
Engineers: Engineers' arch.
Laws: Law building.
Architects: Engineers' arch.
Dents: Dental building.
Eds: In front of Library
Medics: Medical buildinga
hospital.

and

FRANCE WORRIES OVER
TRAGEDY SURROUNDING
NUNGESSER AND COLI

Graduate Dean Dead!

I

L

.1,...A lir-

MORE THAN 3,500 REGISTER
CAST BALLOT FOR
NEW LEADERS

TOI

CONTEST MAJOR OFFICES
Connill, Union, S. C. A. And Oratorical
Assoclation Presidents Will {
Be Named
More than 3,800 student voters, from
every class and school on.the campus,
will go to the polls today to choose
the officials who will lead the various
campus activities for the next school
year. Ten juniors will contest the
four ;major presidential offices, while
a large number of students will enter
the races for the various minor posi-
tions.
One of the most interesting contests
of the day. will be the race for the
pfsidency of the Union where William
Jeffries, '28, will oppose Henry Grin-
nell, '28, for the office. Both men h'ave
had considerable experience in the af-
fairs of the - orgatstion, and have
held positions of considerable respon-
sibility there. Jeffries was chairman
of the underclass committee this year
and also chairman of the freshman
group, while Grinnell has served in
the underclass department of the
Union and on the Union life member-
ship committee, in addition to serving
on the Student Council and on the
Board in Control of Athletics.$

Ofidial

Dalu0

All Campus Election, Wednesday, May 11
INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a cross in the square ( ) before1
the name of the candidate for whom you wish to vote.

Michigan Union

Students' Christian
Association

(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

(All Men Vote)
PRLESIDENT
('Vote for One)

[
[

]

WILLIAM V JEFFRIES
HENRY'S. GRINNELL

RECORDING SECRIfTARY
(Vote for One)
E--l-TTNRY M. KLINE
[ ] W. ROGER GREENE
[ ] ROJERT L. HALSTED
LITERARY VICE PRES
(Vote Only for One and Only
In' Your Dept).

[
I'
II

II
]

KENNETH HAVEN
CHARLES BEHYMER"
WILLIAM BRUMBAUGH

Those who vote express themselves
as beihg in favor of the objectives
of the Student Christian Association.

[
[

]
]

James T. Herald, '28, definite-
ly announced last night that he
would not be a candidate for
vice president of the Oratorical
association "despite the fact that
his name will appear on the bal-
lot today. Reports that Herald
had reconsidered his withdrawal
were denied by him. He does
not desire to run for the office in
question because he contemplates
graduating in February, 1928

[
sI
E

]
]
]

CHARLES B. GILBERT
DE LESLIE L. ALLEN
COMBINED VICE PRES.
ROBERT D. ORCUTT
HAROLD A. GREENE
PHILIP M. NORTHROP
LAW VICE PRES.
ROWAN FASQUELLE
PAUL W. BRUSKE

Oratorical
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)

PRESIDENT

NATIONWIDE ANGER CE TE Sj
AGAINST ERRONEOUS
PRESS REPORTS
ARE FULL DAY OVERDUE
American Officials Order Available
Coast Guard Cutters Out In
Search Of Flyers
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, May 10.-The people of
France spent a day of deep anxiety
over the fate of the aviators, Nunges-
ser and Coli, of whom there is no
news whatever tonight. The sad reali-
zation set in upon the French today
that they had made a carnival cele-
bration over what may be a tragedy,
and what certainly has been a failure.
Mingled with the nation-wide worry
is deep bitterness and anger against
the press, which fanned the country's
flame of pride to rejoicing with the
false news that the two fiers had
succeeded inttheirtgreat adventure.
Accusations, denials, explanations:
and recriminations filled the columns
of today's newspapers, and no small
part of the bitterness is directed
against the United States, froi which
the press insists, all erroneous news
emanates.
NEW YORK, May 10.-Hope for the
rescue of the French aviators, Cap-
tains Nungesser and Coli, appears to,
hang by the tenuous thread that they
may have been picked up at sea by'
Newfoundland fishermen or by some
small coasting vessel off Ireland.
Overdue a full day here c their
airplane flight from Paris, the fate of
the French war aces has become a
mystery of the sea. Wireless stations
from New York to Labrador sputtered
messages today in all directions ask-
ing steam ships in their course to
hunt for the aviators. But none re-
ported sighting the "White Bird
which hopped off so bravely from Le-
Boureet field, with the "skull and
cross-bones" and "death head" mark
on the white fusilage as if to defy the
elements.
WASHINGTON, May 10.-Apparent-
ly ignoring the anti-American senti-
ment exhibited in Paris after the fail-
ure of the French transatlantic flight
American officials today ordered all
available government facilities into
the search for Captain Charles Nun-
gesser, the French ace, and his navi-
gator, Captain Coll.
A request from the French embassy
that the American government lend its
aid to the quest was transmitted by
Secretary Kellogg to the navy and
treasury departments and later was
discussed at the White House. Presi-
dent Coolidge instructed Secretary
Mellon to put every available facility
of the Coast Guard in patrolling the
waters of the north Atlantic, and Sec-
retary Wilbur called on the American
naval attache at Paris for sugges-
tions.
WASHINGTON, May 10.-Myron P.
Herrick, American ambassador to
France, today cabled the state depart-
ment that any attempt by American
aviators to make a transatlantic flighty
while the fate of Captains Nungesserj
and Coli still is in doubt, "might be
,misunderstood and misinterpreted."
HONORARY GROUP1
HOLDS INITIATION
More than seventy scientists were
initiated in the local chapter of Sigma
Xi at their annual banquet held last
night at the Michigan Union. The in-
itiates included both undergraduates

HA S RhF
'AFTER
HEAR TI
GRADUATE SCHOO
TWELVE HOUR!
STRICKEN D
Dean Alfred 11 . Lloyd, of the
this morning in the Lnivrsity h
Dean Alfred I. Lloyd heart failure suffered while delive
Of the Graduate School, who was Oit convocation ccrem nies in Hiii
stricken with a heart ailment yester- Although physicians up to mid
day afternoon during Swing-out. he suffered a relapse in the early
gaining consciousness. His wife w
fLL INem tDr. A. C. Kerlikowske, chief
The following statement was is- .'.
sued by Frank E. Robbins, secre- hospital, in a statement issued this
tary to the President, this morn- was "coronary thrombosis', or hea
Those who knew Dean Lloyd's Dean Lloyd was reported 1y
sane, always kindly, courageous versity hospital, at 10 o'clock lasti
spirit-and this includes all who but critical condition. But the rela
knew him at all-realize what his
loss means to the University of
Michigan. His service to the BULLETIN
Universityy meant for him arduous ' 'I. WarreiP. 'Loii#r Profes--
labor through many years, but it
was always performed wisely and sor Emeritus of physiology, in a
in Dr. Lloyd's characteristically statement late this morning said
unostentatious way. To his col- that the death was caused by a
leagues, whether of his own age blood clot in one of the arteries
or younger, it has been miuch to of the heart. At one o'clock this
have had him as a friend. What morning, Dean Lloyd was a little
lee has been to us we cannot ex- better and the doctors had some
press in words. But his cali1, hope for his recovery. Thlien his
kind, loveliness of character is heart began to fail,
something that we shall not lose.
HONORS CONVOCATION
RIBANKSS EDU D TO B HELD
WIAKENThe honors convocation,
scheduled for 11 o'clock this
morning will take place, slated
SBJ.A. Brsley, dean of students
at 10 o'clock this morning. Fol
lowing a conference of Univer.
Waters Released By Breaks In Levees sity officials it was deemed best
Threaten To Flood 9,000,000 to hold the convocation as
Acres In Louisiana . scheduled.
(By Associated Press) STATEMENT OF SECRETARY
NEW ORLEANS, May 10.-Two flood , SMITH
crests were approaching Bayou des
Glaises and the Old river tonight, as The death of Dean Alfred H. Lloyd
hundreds of residents of the flooded is deeply affecting to me. He was my
district bent every effort to the task teacher over thirty years ago, and in
of reinforcing embankments holding all the intervening years his calm
back the mounting waters. strength and kindly sympathy had
One of the crests, south of Rayville, never failed. He has been a landmark
Louisiana, with a narrow ridge sep- oak. He was stricken in the midst
arating it from the others, was that of an emergency duty which he had
of the waters released by breaks in accepted as imperturbably as he al-
the Arkansas river levee. Moving ways took whatever came to him in the
southward to meet waters from the day's work.
Mississippi, freed by crevasses in that
system, they have moved upon Ray- Seniors Assemble Near Library
ville and Mere Rouge, but at both Assembling in the traditional com
places the waters have fallen indi- mencement caps and ,gowns the mem.
eating that the crest had passed. bers of all graduating classes of all
The second crest, entering the Tex- schools and colleges of the University
as basin through flood waters stream- assembled near the Library steps yes-
ing from breaches in the main Missis- terday and marched to Hill auditorium
sippi levee system at Cabin Teele and to observe the annual Swing-out cere,
sip lve ytm tano bevete nua wngot ee

LAPSE
SUDDEN
ATTACK

L HEAD SUCCUMBS
U AFTER BEING
LJRING TALK

]
]

iraduate school, died at 3: 15 o'clock
ospital as a result of an attack of
ring the address before the Swing-
auditorium yesterday afternoon.
night were hopeful of his recovery,
morning and passed away without
as at the bedside when the end carne.
resident physician of the University
morning said that the cause of death
rt failure. The end came peacefully.
Dr. Harley A. H1aynes, of the Uni-
night to be in a somewhat improved
Ipse came soon after midnight.
Dean Lloyd was born January 3,

'C
'C

]I
I

ROBERT E. MINNICH
EMMANUEL J. HARRIS
ROB1RT S. MILLER
VICE PRESIDENT
JAMES HERALD
LYLE E. EISERMAN

1864, in Montclair, N. J., of parents of
American nationality. There were
four brothers in the family. He was
given his preparatory training in the
high schools of Westfield, Mass., and
i Montclair, N. J., and the St. Johns-
bury academy, St. Johnsbury, Vt., from
1878 to 1882
Ire entered harvard university in
1882 and was graduated from there
with his 'Batchelor's degree in 1886.
Shortly afterwards he entered as a
graduate student and was given his
Master's degree in 1888. He was a
James Walker fellow from Harvard
at the Universities of Berlin and
Heidelberg, 1889-1891. The degree of
Doctor of Philosophy was conferred
on him in 1893.
Professor Lloyd was an instructor in
English and Latin at Phillips academy,
Andover, 'Mass., in the year 1886-1887.
In 1891 he became an instructor of
Philosophy in the University of Michi-
gan and three years later was made an
assistant professor. In 1899 he was
made junior professor and in 1906
a Professor of Philosophy. He was
made dean of the graduate school in
1915.
In 1925 following the death of Pres-
ident Marion Leroy Burton he was
made acting President and served in
that capacity until September, when
President Little assumed the duties of
the presidency.
Dean Lloyd married Miss Margaret
E. Crocker Dec. 28, 1892, in Spring-
field, Mass. At the present time he
has four children living, the oldest of
whom is 27 years.
He is a member of the American
Philosophical association and the
American Psychological association,
and was president of the Western
Philosophical association in 1915 and
1916.
Dean Lloyd has published four
hnnic" Citii~n ir h ur lrtn

ENGINEERING VICE PRES.

I
]

C

[.
[
[

3
J
]

I

_ I

Another of the interesting contests
for major offices will be the race be-
tween Courtland C. Smith, '28, and
John Snodgrass, '28E, for president of
the Student council. Smith has been 1
a member of The Daily staff for three
years and has reported the Studentj
council meetings for the year just
closed, holding the position of night
editor, while Snodgrass has been a
membier of the Student council dur-
ing the year just closed and has also
been prominent in the affairs of the
engineering school.
Have Three In Contest
A three cornered race is the fea-
ture of the contest for the president
of the Oratorical association, where E.j
J. Harris, '30L, Robert Miller, '28, and,
Robert Minnich, '28, will oppose each
other for the office.. All three of the I
men have been prominent for three
years in forensic adivities on the cam-
pus, and Miller and Harris have been
on varsity debate teams, while Min-
nicl w Nas treasurer of the Oratorical
association during the year just closed.
Another-three cornered race exists'
in contest for president of the Student
Christian association, where Charles
Behymer, '28, Wiliam Brumbaugh, '28
and Kenneth Haven, '28, will oppose
each other.
On the same ballot, also, the 'candi-
dates for recording secretary of the
Union will be voted for. Roger Greene, E

HAROLD M. PHILPOTT
ROSCOE A. DAVIDSON
JAMES G. McKILLEN, JR.
MEDIC VICE PRES.
E. GIFFORD UPJOHN
EDWARD K. ISBEY

SECRETARY

[
[

]I
]

LAURA SOULE
HILDA M. EVANS

]
]

TREASURER

_ II

[C
[

]I
]I

WALTER NORTH
PAUL J. KERN

::

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

Board in Control of
Student Publicationsl
(Entire Campus Vote)
(Vote for Three

]I
]

JOHN T. SNODGRASS
COURTLAND C. SMITH

,:

r

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)
] LEO HOFFMAN
] ELLIS MERRY
] RUSSELL SAUER
] GEORGE ANNABLE
] WAYNE COWELL
] CHARLES GILBERT
] ROBERT HALSTED
] JOHN HEDRICK
] MARION HODGSON
JUNIOR iREPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)

[ J
[I1
[ I
Et

WILTON A. SIMPSON
HENRY THURNAU
CASSAM A. WILSON
JOHN A. CUNNINGHAM
THOMAS J. DOTTGALL
MATTHEW J. HUDSON
LOUIS F. KNOEPP
GEORGE E. MONROE
FRANCIS A. NORQUIST

Winter Quarters, still was in Madison monies. Marching in two columns ledoo s: ' zensnip and aivation
parish and was due at the mouth of by Henry S. Maentz, '27, president of (1897); "Dynamic Idealism" (1898);
Old river between May 11 and May 15. I the senior literary class, and Thomas "Philosophy of History" (1899), and
Already these waters have covered Cavanaugh, '27, president of the Stu- "The Will to Doubt" (1907). In 1922
several Louisiana parishes. Those re- dent council, the groups proceeded up was published -"Leadership and Prog-
leased by the cracks in the two levees the diagonal and turned off to Hill au- ress."
systems have covered or threatened ditorium. The Varsity band led the He was a member of Phi Beta
9,098,840 acres in northwestern Louis- procession and remained at the en- Kappa and Phi Chi fraternity.
iana. Tullula, Louisiana. was under to trance of the auditorium while seniors
some four to six feet of water. At filed into the building. In the midst of an address before
St. Joseph and Ferriday. below Tull-, Prayer Follows ])ean's Attack 'senior students during the annual
ula, water still was rising at the rate After the invocation had been givenS.
of five inches in 24 hours, wh'ile at by the Rev. Henry Lewis of the local Swing-out ceremonies in Hill audi-
Sicily Island in the middle of the Episcopal church, Dean Lloyd ad- torium yesterday, Dean Alfred H.
Texas basin, in northeastern Cata- dressed the assemblage and had cov- Lloyd of the graduate school suffered
houla parish, a rise of a foot and three ered the major portion of his ad- an acute heart attack, fell backward
inches had been shown in' the last 24 dress before being stricken. Following 'in a faint, and was taken to Univer-
hours the heart attack of Dean Lloyd a sity hospital. Ihe regained conscious-
prayer was led by Rev. Lewis. The-
,+exercises were concluded with the ness shortly after the attack. Dean

Board in Control of
Athletics

]

JOHN KEANE

If 1 JOHN K{NT~IGHT I

t

I

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