100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 11, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ESTABLISHED
1890

itL

~tailg

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 159

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARDOR. MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DEAN LLOYD SUFFERS
ACUTE HEART ATTACK
IN MIDST OF ADDRESSI

Condition Of Dean Is'
Somewhat Improved

(ONDITION WAS CRITICAL
SOMEWHAT IMPROVED
LAST NIGHT

BuT

RECOVERY IS EXPECTED 1
Traditional March Is Assembled At
Library r*eps; Is Led By
Maentz And Cavanaugh
BUTLLETIN
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the
graduate school was reported byI
Dr. Harley A. Haynes of the ITni-
versity hospital at 10 o'clock last 1
niht as heing in a somewhat im-
proved but critical condition fol-
lowing a heart attack suffered in
Hill auditorium during the annual Dean Alfred H. Lloyd
Swing-out ceremonies. Of the Graduate School, who was
In the midst of ,an address before stricken with a heart ailment yester-
senior students during the annual day afternoon during Swing-out.
Swing-out ceremonies in Hill audi-
torium yesterday, Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd of the graduate school suffered
an acute heart attack, fell backward
in a faint, and was taken to Univer-
sity hospital. He regained conscious-
ness shortly after the attack. DeanI
Lloyd had completed the major por- Campus Election
tion of his address entitled "Some AlC m u Eecin
Factors of a'Life Worth While" when
he was stricken. Dr. Frank N. Wilson, INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a
heart specialist of the University hos- j the name of the candidatef
pital staff was summoned last night to
care for Dean Lloyd. It is expected
that Dean Lloyd will recover from the Michigan Union
attack.
Dean Lloyd has been connected with
the University since 1891 when he was (All Men Vote)
appointed an instructr in philosophy.s
In 1894 he became an assistant pro- PRESIDENT
fessor, in 1899 a junior professor, and (
In 1906 a professor. He has been dean (Vote for One)
of the graduate school since 1915 and[.
following the death of President Le- [ ] HENIY . G EFNREEL
roy Burton Was acting president of
the University in 1925. E
Seniors Assemble Near Library SECRETARY
Assembling in the 'aditional corn (Tte for One)
mencement caps anti gowns the mein- (oefrOe
hers of all graduating classes of all [ ] HENRY M. KLINE
schools and colleges of the University [ ] W. ROGER GREENE
assembled near the Library steps yes- ROBEFRT L. HALSTED
terday and marched to Hill auditoriumf
to observe the annual Swing-out cere- LITERARY VICE PRES.'
monies. Marching in two columns le' j

PL AN FOR DINNER
ON FAT HE RS' DAY
Prof. Arthur L. Cross, of the his-
tory department, has been made toast-
master of the Fathers' and Sons' week-
end banquet which will be held in the
Union assembly hail, Saturday noon,
May 14, it was anfiounced yesterday
by Roger W. Greene, '28, chairman of
the committee in charge of the event.
President Clarence Cook Little and J.
'Arthur Whitworth, '94, will be the
speakers on the program, the latter
speaking on behalf of the fathers.
Thesprogram for celebration of the
fathers' week-end will open Friday
night with Cap night exercises in
Sleepy Hollow. Saturday noon the
banquet will be held and Saturday af-
ternoon there is to be a track meet
with Illinois and a tennis meet with
Indiana. Complinrentary tickets for
these last two events may be made
available to the fathers. Complimen-I
tary tickets for the motion picture at
the Arcade theater have been obtain-j
ed by the committee.
Complimentary tickets for the UnionI
poolhavehalso been obtained for all
fathers who come to Ann Arbor. Many
letters have been sent to house pres-j
idents inviting the fathers here.

FRHANCE. WORRIES OVER'
TRAGIDYSURROUNDINOI
INUNOESSERAND COLI1
i NATIONWIDE ANGEII CENTERS
AAI\ST ERRONEOUS
PRESS REP()RTS
ARE FULL DAY OVERDUE
Amerlean Officials Order Avaiable !
Coast Guard Cutters Out In
Search Of Flyers
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, May 10.-The people of
France spent a day of deep anxiety
over the fate of the aviators, Nunges-
ser and Coli, of whom there is no
news whatever tonight. The sad reali-
zation set in upon the French today
that they had made a carnival cele-
bration over what may be a tragedy,,
and what certainly has been a failure.
Mingled with the nation-wide worry
is deep bitterness and anger against
the press, which fanned the country's
flame of pride to rejoicing with the
false news that the two fliers had
succeeded in their great adventure.
Accusations, denials, explanations
and recriminations filled the columns
of today's newspapers, and no small
part of the bitterness is directed
against the United States, from which
the press insists, all erroneous news
emanates.j
NEW YORK, May 10.-Hope for the
rescue of the French aviators, Cap-3
tains Nungesser and Coli, appears to
hang by the tenuous thread that they
may have been picked up at sea by
Newfoundland fishermen or by some
small coasting vessel off Ireland.
Overdue a full day here on their
airplane flight from Paris, the fate of
the French war aces has become a
mystery of the sea. Wireless stations,
from New York to Labrador sputtered
messages today in all directions ask-
ing steam ships in their course to
hunt for the aviators. But none re-
ported sighting the "White Bird,"'
which hopped off so bravely from Le-
Boureet fieldf, with the "skull and.
cross-bones" and "death head" mark
on the white fusilage as if to defy the
elements.

ANNUAL BONFIRE I
SET FOR FRIDAY
"Cap Night", the traditional affair
which marks the passing of each class
to the class above, and the night on
which the freshmen cast their pots
into the huge bonfire to the tune of
"Where, Oh Where, are the verdant
freshmen?" will be celebrated Friday
night. The location of the event has
not yet been decided, but both Sleepy
Hollow and Ferry Field are under con-
sidleration by the committee
As is customary, the classes ill
form at designated places on the cam-j
pus anti will march to the scene. TheI
Varsity band will lead the iarch and
the classes will follow according to
seniority, the freshmen bringing ups
the rear guard. Upon arrival at the
scene of the ceremony the classes will
be seated in places arranged for them. I
Complete announcement ofthe list
of sneakers has not yet been made
by the committee but the speaker for
the students will be Thomas V. Koy-
kka, '27. President Clarence Cook
Little will speak for the faculty. Fol-
lowing this a. representative of the 1
athletic association will present "M"
blankets to varsity athletes. Then theI
band will play "Where, Oh Where",
and as each class comes to its verse
the members will rise and sing. As the
freshmen sing they will form in aj
line and cast their symbols of servi-
tude into the flames.
Following the event, the Butterfield
Theaters, through Gerald Hoag, will
present a free movie show in Hill au-
ditorium. The doors will not be open-
ed until the Cap Night ceremoniesj
have been completed. The picture will
be a special one that is not showing
at the local theatres.
RIVER BAN KS iWEAKEN'
BEFOEPFOODCRESTI
Waters Released By Breaks In Levees
Threaten To Flood 9,000,000
Acres In Louisiana
IMPERIL THOUSANDS
(}3y Associated Press)
NEW ORLEANS, May 10.-Two flood
crests were approaching Bayou des'
Glaises and the Old river tonight, as
hundreds of residents of the floodedi
districtbent every effort to the task
of reinforcing embankments holding!

I

Balot

1 Wednesday. May 11
cross in the square ( ) before
for whom you wish to vote.
Students' Christian
Association
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

ALLSCHOOLS TO VOTE TODAY
IN ANNUAL CAMPUS ELECTIONS
TO CHOOSE STUDENT OFFICERS

[
I.
=E.

]
ii

KENNETH HAVEN
CHARLES BEHYMER
WILLIAM BRUMBAUGH

Those who vote express themselves
as being in favor of the objectives
of the Student Christian Association.

s t

(Vote Only for One and Only
In Your Dept).

1}

Seniors are expected to wear
their caps and gowns today and
each following Wednesday until
Commencement.

cI
[

1I
1

by Henry S. Maentz, '27, president of
the senior literary class, and ThomasC
Cavanaugh, '27, president of the Stu-E
dent council, the groups proceeded ur
the diagonal and turned off to Hill au-
ditorium. The Varsity band led the'
procession and remained at the en-C
trance of the auditorium while seniors,
filed into the building.
Prayer Follows Dean's Attack f
After the invocation had been given
by the Rev. Henry Lewis of the local
Episcopal ch'urch, Dean Lloyd ad-
dressed the assemblage and had cov-!
ered the major portion of his ad- C
dress before being stricken. Following
the heart attack of Dean Lloyd a
prayer was led by Rev. Lewis. Thet
exercises were concluded with ther
singing of the "Yellow and the Blue"
after which the seniors marched out
of the auditorium past Barbour gym-
nasium, then by the Library and down
the diagonal, returning to the Library.
steps after marching down South Uni-
versity to Tappan hall. The class pic-:
tures were then taken.
WOMAN SCIENTIST1
TO SPEAK ON ART
Dr. Caroline Ransom Williams,
prominent Egyptologist, will speak
this afternoon at 4:15 in Natural
Science auditorium on "Egyptian
thought and art in 1360 B. C." This
address will be her first public ap-
pearance since her return from a six
months' trip in Egypt as a member of
the scientific staff of the Oriental In-;
stitute of the University of Chicago.
Dr. Williams has studied a number:
of years in Europe and Egypt, and
has held the position of head of the,
archeology department at Bryn Mawr.
For several years she was an assistant{
curator in the Metropolitan Museum
of Art. She has also been active in
Egyptology at institutions in Cleve-
land, Minneapolis, New York, Toledo

[

]
]
]

CHARLES B. GILBERT
DE LESLIE L. ALLEN
COMBINED VICE PRES.
ROBERT D. ORCUTT-
HAROLD A. GREENE
PHILIP M. NORTHROP
LAW VICE PRES.
ROWAN FASQUELLE
P'AUL W. BRUSKE

Oratorical
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
ROBERT E. MINNICH
EMMANUEL J. HARRIS
ROBERT S. MILLER
VICE PRESIDENT
JAMES HERALD
LYLE E. EISERMAN

WASHINGTON, May 10.-Apparent-
ly ignoring the anti-American senti-
ment exhibited in Paris after the fail-
ure of the French transatlantic flight
American officials today ordered all
available government facilities into'
the search for Captain Charles Nun-
gesser, the French ace, and his navi-
gator, Captain Coli.
A request from the French embassy'
that the American government lend its
aid to the quest was transmitted by
Secretary Kellogg to the navy and
treasury departments and later was
discussed at the White House. Presi-
dent Coolidge instructed Secretary'
Mellon to put every available facility
of the Coast Guard in patrolling the I
waters of the north Atlantic, and Sec-I
retary Wilbur called on the American
naval attache at Paris for sugges-
tions.I

back the mounting
One of the crests,
Louisiana, with a n
arating it from the
of the waters relea
the Arkansas river
southward to meet
Mississippi, freed by

[
[

waters.
south of Rayville,
arrow ridge sep-
others, was that
sed by breaks in
levee. Moving1
waters from the
crevasses in that

WIIERIE ')TO VOTE TODAY
Lits: In front of Library.
Engineers: Engineers' arch.
Laws: Law building.
Architects: Engineers' arch.
k Dents: Dental building.
Eds: In front of Library
Medics: Medical building andf
hospital.
Pharmics: In front of library.
Bus. Ads.: In front of library.
Time: 8 to 5 o'clock.
WILL HEAR COULTER,
Second Annual Honors Convocation
Will Be Held Today In
Hill Auditorium
LITTLE WILL PRESIDE.
Dr. Stanley Coulter, former acting
president of Purdue university, will
deliver the principal address at the
fourth annual Honors convocation,
which will take place at 11 o'clock!
this morning in Hill auditorium. Dr.
Coulter's subject has not yet been an-
nounced.
At this time nearly 350 senior stu-
dents in the various colleges who have
distinguished themselves 1scholastic-
ally, will be honored by the Univer-
sity. In addition more than 120 mem-
bers of the freshman and, sophomore
classes along with 100 holders of var-
ious fellowships and scholarships of
1 the University have been invited to
the convocation as honor guests. This
is the first year that other than mem-
bers of the senior classes have re-
ceived this distinction.
President Clarence Cook Little will
be the presiding officer, and will in-
troduce Dr. Coulter as the main
speaker of the meeting. The convoca-
tion will be ouene by an organ num-
ber, played by Eal V. Moore, di-
rector of the School of Music and the
University Glee club will render a
selection. A selection of seats on the
main floor of the auditorium have
been reserved and honor students will
be admitted t this section on presen-
tation of the cards which have been
sent them. Members of the faculty will
be seated on the stage.
The following students have been
invited to the Honors convocation in
recognition of their sccesses in aca-
demic pursuits, with the exception of
freshman and sophomores, whose
names have been omitted for lack of
space.
Literary college: Rapheal Altman,
Florence Catherine Anderson, Anna
Burdsal Arnold, Julius Edward Astra-
chan, Arnold E. Barager, Harriet Irene
Barbour, Lloyd William Bartlett, Her-
i bert Charles Behm, Rachael Janet
Bell, Howard Cullen Blake, Margaret
H. Blander, Irving Jerome Bleiweiss.
Milton Seymour Bofsky, Sue Grundy
Bonner, Madeline Bowers, Norman
I Chester Bowersox, William H. Brom-
{ me, Donald Recker Bruns, Smith Hen-
ry Cady, Sarah Catherine Cake, Don-
ald Harding Chapman, Margaret
. Clark, M. Reed Coleman, Karl Rigley
Crawford, Reed Chasley Cup, Lester
Clarence Davidson, Sarita Isabel Da-
vis, Russell Ralph Dean,'Stanley Ell-
wood Dimond, Harriet Donaldson,
Phillip Dow, Helen Lorene Edwards,
Ray Nelson Faulkner, Cecelia Lee
Fine, Joseph Jay Fineman,- Russell
Arden Fisher, Austin Fleming, Helen
I Annette Fowler.
Myer Givelber, Frederic Samuel
Glover, Edwin Newell Goddard, Julian
; Nathan Goldman, Catherine Elizabeth
Grindley, John Henry Hanley, Alice
Carstens Hirschman, Clarence Carl
Hostrup, Walter Carl Howe, Agnes
Louise Humphreys, Lloyd Huston
Lawrence Charles Human, Roberi

Victor Jaros, Chester William John-
- son, Stephen Everington Jones, Lydia
Ruth Kahn, Mary Elizabeth Kibbey,
Marion Margaret Kiely, Edith Kinder,
Kenneth Moffat King, Robert M. Klep-
inger, Thomas Victor Koykka.
Ruth Lambert, Harold Daniel Lar-
*senMarion Eunace Leland,rMarshall
' Herman Levy, George Herbert Likert,
John LoCricchio, Samuel Jesse Lu-
kens, Violet Almeda McCredie, Grac
Helen McDonald, Carl Hilding Man-
a son, George Yaple Meader, Josephine
,Elizabeth Megaro, Charles August

CONTEST MAJOR OFFICES
Council, Union, S. C. A. And Oratorical
Association Presidents Will
Be Named
More than 3,800 student voters, from
every class and school on the campus,
will go to the polls today to choose
the officials who will lead the various
campus activities for the, next school
year. Ten juniors' will contest the
four major presidential offices, while
a large number of students will enter
the races for the various minor posi-
tions.
One of the most interesting contests
of the day will be the race for the
presidency of the Union where William
Jeffries, '28, will oppose Henry Grin-
nell, '28, for the office. Both men have
had considerable experience in the af-
fairs of the organization, and have
held positions of considerable respon-
sibility there. Jeffries was chairman
of the underclass committee this year
and also chairman of the freshman
group, while Grinnell has served in
the underclass department of the
Union and on the Union life member-
ship committee, in addition to serving
on the Student Council and on the
Board in Control of Athletics.
I James T. Herald, '28, definite-
ly announced last night that he
would not be a candidate for
vice president of the Oratorical
association despite the fact that
I his name will appear on the bal-
lot today. Reports that Herald
had reconsidered his withdrawal
were denied by him. He does
I not desire to run for the office in
question because he contemplates
I graduating in February, 1928

MORE ThHAN 3,800 REGISTER
CAS'r IBALLOT FOR
NEW LEAD)ERS

]I
]
]

TO

[
CI

]

ENGINEERING VICE PRES.

[
[

]
]

[
[

]
]

HAROLD M. PHILPOTT
ROSCOE A. DAVIDSON
JAMES G. McKILLEN, JR.
MEDIC VICE PRES.
E. GIFFORD UPJOHN
EDWARD K. ISBEY

SECRETARY

[
II

]
]

LAURA SOULE
HILDA M. EVANS

r
[

]

TREASURER

I

[
[

I
]

WALTER NORTH
PAUL J. KERN

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

Board in Control of
Student Publications
(Entire Campus Vote)
(Vote for Three

WASHINGTON, May 10.-Myron P.I
Herrick, American ambassador to
France, today cabled the state depart-I
ment that any attempt by American
aviators to make a transatlantic flight I
while the fate of Captains Nungesser1
and Coli still is in doubt, "might be !
misunderstood and misinterpreted." I
FIRST TAG SALES
NET LARGE TOTAL
Sale of tags yesterday by the Stu-
dent Christian association for their
summer Fresh Air ,Camp resulted in
the collection of $472, about fifty dol-
iars more than last year. Only $193
has been received from the various,
1 fraternity and sorority houses so far
This amount is less than half the sum
that was subscribed by them last year.
i Though few houses have -responded,
the average amounts given have been
greater than before. The association
requests that all houses that intend to
help in this way send in their con-
tributions as soon as possible so that
the committee in charge can definite-
ly settle how many boys can be ac-
commodated.
Thus far the money donated by the
students will send about sixty boys to
camp. Last year the students provided
for over, 100 boys. Alumni and lunch-
eon clubs took care of theremaining
250. H..H. Grafton, secretary of the1
association, said yesterday, that un-
less more contributions were forth-
1 omin romvnil- em- s oza-

system, they have moved upon Ray-
ville and Mere Rouge, but at both
places the waters have fallen indi-
c ating that the crest h'ad passed.
IThe second crest, entering the Tex-f
as basin through flood waters stream-
ing from breaches in the main Missis-
sippi levee system at Cabin Teele and
Winter Quarters, still was in Madison
parish and wVas due at the mouth of
Old river between May 11 and May 15.1
Already these waters have covered
SseveralbLouisiana parishes. Those re-
leased by the cracks in the two levees
systems have covered or threatened
9,098,840 acres in northwestern Louis-
iana. Tullula, Louisiana, was under to
some four to six feet of water. At
St. Joseph and Ferriday, below Tull-
ula, water still was rising at the rate
of five inches in 24 hours, while at
Sicily Island in the middle of the
Texas basin, in northeastern Cata-
houla parish, a rise of a foot and three
inches had been shown in the last 24
! hours.
SENIOR CLASSES
TO SINGTONIGHT
Seniors of all colleges of the Univer-
sity will meet at 7:15 o'clock tonight,
at the steps of the Library for the
traditional Senior sing. The Varsity
band will give a concert in conjunc-
tion with the event, to start at 7:15
o'clock, and the Glee club will be pres-
ent to aid in the singing.
Senior's are expected to wear caps
and gowns, as is customary, and the
event will not last more than an hour
and a half, according to Clarence
Hostrup, '27, chairman of the com-
mittee in charge.
Forest Brimacombe, '27, and Helen
Crawford, '27, have assisted Hostrup in
the preparations for the event.
HONORARY GROUP
HOLDS INITIATION
More than seventy scientists wer
initiated in the local chapter of Sigma
Xi at thei.annual banouiet held last

Another of the interesting contests
for major offices will be the race be-
tween Courtland 9 Smith, '28, and
John Snodgrass, '28E, for president of
the Student council. Smith has been
a member of The Daily staff for three
years and has reported theStudent
council meetings for the year just
closed, holding the position of night
editor, while Snodgrass has been a
member of the Student council dur-
ing the year just closed and has also
been prominent in the affairs of the
engineering school.
Have Three In Contest
A three cornered race is the fea-
ture of the contest for the president
of the Oratorical association, where E.
J. Harris, '30L, Robert Miller, '28, and
Robert Minnich, '28, will oppose each
other for the office. All three of the
men have been prominent for three
years in forensic activities on the cam-
pus, and Miller and Harris have been
on varsity debate teams, while Min-
nich was treasurer of the Oratorical
association during the year just closed.
Another three cornered race exists
in contest for president of the Student
Christian association, where Charles
Behymer, '28, Wiliam Brumbaugh, '28,
and Kenneth Haven, '28, will oppose
each other.
On the same ballot, also, the candi-
dates for recording seeretary of the
Union will be voted for, Roger Greene,
'28, Robert Halsted, '28, and Henry
Kline, '28, runnng for the office.
Greene withdrew from the race for
president of the Union to enter the,
lists as a candidate for recording sec-
retary, and both Halsted and Kline
have had a great deal of experience in
Union activities.
Two Run For Union Office
DeLisle Allen, '28, and Charles Gil-
bert, '28, will run for the office of
literary vice-president of the Union,
one of the five vice-presidential office
that carries with it a membership on
the Board of Governors. Harold
Greene, '28, Philip Northrup, '28D, and
Robert Orcutt, '28D, will run for the
position of combined vice president,
while Paul Bruske, '28L, and Rowan
Fasquelle, '28, will contest the same
office in the law school..
Roscoe Davidson, '28E, James Mc-
Killen, '28E, and Harold Philpott,
'28E, will run for the office of en-
gineering vice-president and Edward
Isbey, '28M, and Gifford Upjohn, '28M,
will contest the office in the Medical

[
[

]
]

JOHN T. SNODGRASS
COURTLAND C. SMITH

SEN[OR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)

C
[
[
[
[
[

J
]
]
]
]
]
]
]

LEO HOFFMAN
ELLIS MERRY
RUSSELL SAUER
GEORGE ANNABLE
WAYNE COWELL
CHARLES GILBERT
ROBERT HALSTED
JOHN HEDRICK
MARION HODGSON

[
Ci
CI
C
I-i
C
C'

]
1
]
]
]
]
]

WILTON A. SIMPSON
HENRY THURNAU
CASSAM A. WILSON
JOHN A. CUNNINGHAM
THOMAS J. DOTTGALL
MATTHEW J. HUDSON
LOUIS F. KNOEPP
GEORGE E. MONROE
FRANCIS A. NORQUIST

JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)

Board in Control of
Athletics

3L'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan