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May 08, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-08

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I s

ESTABLISHED
1890

fi trit an

PailF

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII No. 157 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, MAY 8, 1927 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

NEW HIGH L1EES,
NEW ORLEANS WARNED TO TAKE
.I RECAUTlION\S AG~AINSTY
CREST OF WATERS
LEVEES DECLARED SAFE
Suffers Recelmhig Red Cross Aaid
Number 338,004 With Figures
Still Incompletej
(By Associated Press)
NEW ORLEANS, May 7.-Driven
riotously before the flood current, the
waters of the Mississippi had reached
new high levels tonight over a long'
stretch from Donaldsonville to An-,
gola.
Record stages also were recorded'
at places along the Old river, which
empties into the Mississippi north of
Baton Rouge, and which is receiving
flood waters from the Red, Ouchita,
Tensas and Black rivers as well as.
from the great crevasse and back
water lake spreading in northeastern
Louisiana.
Watch Crest Waters
In announcing this situation on the
two rivers, the weather bureau re-
iterated its warning that every pre-
caution should be taken to guard"
against the stages above New Orleans
with the approach of the crest, which'
now is south of Vicksburg, approxi-
mately half way between Memphis and,

MESSAGES SHOW
PEACE ATTEMPTS
BY NICARAGUANS
(B~y Ass~ocated Pr ess)
WASHINGTON, May 7-Predictions!
of liberal cooperation in the peace
# move in Nicaragua were born out in
a measure today in telegrams frorc,
Henry L. Stimson, President Cool
idge's personal representative on thel
ground.
He reported that General Monterra,
Liberal commander-in-chief, was co-
operating to some extent with the
[Diaz conservative government in set-E
ting up a temporary governmental
structure to tide over the period until
an American supervised presidential
election is held in 1928.
President Diaz had accepted a sug-
gestion from Monterra to name im-
portant Liberals as governors of the
six departments of the country where
:the Liberals are in a majority. The
step is expected by Washington of-
fioials to facilitate materially the gen-
eral disarmament plan, leaving
American marines to police the coun-
try until a non-partisan constabulary
under American officers is organized.
Mr. Stimson again expressed his
conviction today that the civil war
.vas 'over despite refusal of Monterra?
and some other Liberals to ratify
any peace agreement that contemplat-
ed retention of the presidency by Diaz
until the election. While they con-
tinued to hold out on that score,
Mr. Stimson indicated that in all prac-
tical matters the Liberals were lend-
ing their assistance in the pacifica-
tion work and that the de facto co-
operation between Diaz and hisibi b..-
eral opponents had been established
Disarmament of both Liberal and
Conservative armies was to have been
completed today.

OFFICIAL BALLOT

All Campus Election, Wednesday. May 11
INSTRUCTIONS:--Place a cross in the square ( ) before
the name of the candidate for whom you wish to vote.

DETROIT PASTOR ITR CK QUAEWISDRES1
TOGIVE ADDRESS
AT CONVOCATION
Reinold Niebuhr, pastor of the De-
troit Bethel Christian qhurch, and BY C 0 til L. FU 7IUd7I; LI LI N VI S
contributor to the Atlantic Monthly
and other piriodicals, will be the
speaker at the third spring convoca-
tion this morning in Hill auditorium
'111TT -I

Michigan Union
(All Me", Vote)
(TtESIDENT
(Vote for 0n2)

Students' Christian
Association
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDE NT
(Vote for One)

[
C:

]
]

HENRY S. GINNELL
WILLIAM V. JEFFRIES
RECORDIN SECRETARY
(Vote for One)
ROBERT L. HALSTEAD
HENRY M. KLINE
WILLIAM R. GREENE

[
[
as
of

]
]
]

CHARLES BEHYMER
WILLIAM BRUMBAUGH
KENNETH HAVEN

[

]
]
]

Those who vote express themselves
being in favor with the objectives
the Student Christian Association.

at 11 oclock. His subject has been
announced as "The Art of Living To-
gether." a
Dr. Niebuhr is recognized as a
leader in the field of ecclesiastic
thotght and is secretary of the Chris-
tion Social Order. He has been pastor'
of the Bethel church since his ordin-
ation in 1915.
The nrogram for the convocation
has been specially arranged to co-
incide with the observance of Moth-
er's Day, and special numbers have
been prepared with that end in view.
This convocation will be the last of
the year, arranged under the joint
auspices of the Student council, the
Women's league, and the School of
Religion.
Rev. Niebuhr has appeared in Ann!
Arbor on several other occasions
and is familiar to student audiences.
He was a sneaker at the conference
of students held last year in Mil-
waukee.
M4 P. A. CLOSES WITH;
ELECTIONSAND TALKS11
Presentation of Awards And Election
Of Officers Concludes Final
Convention Sessions

LITERARY VICE PRE .
(Vote Only for One and Only
in Your Dept).

[
[
[

3i
]
]
]

DE ,LESLIE L. ALLE N
THOMAS J. DOUGALL
CH RLES B. GILBERT
GEORGE H. ANNABLE
COMBINEI VICE LPRES.
HAROLD A. GREENE
PHILIP M. NORTHRUP
ROBERT D. ORCUTT

!
i
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IN

NDIANS RETAIN FIRST PLACE MAIZE AND BLUE TRACKMEN WI
Ii IN 'lItTN SrtANDlNG NUNE FIRST PLACES IN
BYI WINNI V, 6-1 DOWNINGH AWKS
ILLINI COLLECT 12 HITS HORNBERGER BEATS HUNN

Oratorical
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
ROBERT S. MILLER
ROBERT E. MINNICH
VICE PRESIDENT
LYLE E. EISERMAN
JTAMES mT4PT'

Michigan Displays Erratic Fielding1
And Weak Biating In Losing
'Tird Came Of Season
iMichigan relinquished the few hopes
she had of remaining in the race for
the Big Ten baseball championship
by bowing in defeat before the Uni-
versity of Illinois, the present leaders
of the Conference standing, 6-1, yes-
terday afternoon, in a game marred
by the usual erratic fielding and poor
hitting ability of the Wolverines.
If Michigan was considered a con-
tender for the title, Illinois can be
easily named as the real championship
team of this season's race. Illinois
showed major league class in its field-
ing and base running in contrast to
the mediocre style displayed by the
Michigan nine. The Indians continued
their heavy hitting pace, gaining 12
hits off of Miller, the star of the Wol-.
verine pitching staff, while Michigan
had great difficulty in hitting the of-
ferings of Stewart. The Wolverinest
got only one hit in the first five inn-
ings, but fiinally showed a faint sign
of the hitting power which aided them

- -- - - - -

[
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]

[C
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LAW VICE PRES.

r

]

New Orleans.
After an inspection of the levees
along the present greatest danger
point, the 80-mile front on the Old
river and the Bayou DesGlais to the
south-Governor Simpson declared at!
Baton Rouge that in his poinion thesej
embankments were strong enough to
hold the anticipated highest flood
stage and thus save south central
Louisiana.!
Major W. H. Holcombe, chief army
engineer for the fourth district, who
is traveling down the river with Sec-
.retary Hoover and his party, stated
at Natchez that the west bank defenses
on the lower Mississippi which are
yet to bear increased burdens from the
flood, were being well maintained. l
Red Cross AhIs Many
MEMPHIS, May 7.-Flood sufferersj
receiving aid from the Red Cross in
the seven states affected in the disas-
trous Mississippi flood iuundation
numbered 338,000 tonight with the
Louisiana figures still incomplete.
New evacuations are going forward
in the face of rising waters along
several rivers in south central Louisi-
ana and the list of the needy is ex-1
pected to reach 350,000 soon. The
figures include more than 180,000 per-
sons who are refugees in the 64 con-
centration camps, four new camps
having been added since the last
figures were issued. The remainder
are receiving food and other help int
their flooded homes, upper floors of
store buildings and places where they
elected to seek refuge until the waters
recede.
The total vaccination for typhoid
reached 119,000 persons with those
for smallpox at 108,000.
WARTHIN ELECTED

i
'
,

"TILT *1V i "rl " fln "%r . is- .rr

FIRST YEAR MEN WIN
ANNUAL CLASS GAMES

[
[

]
II

ROWAN FASQUE
PAUL W. BRUSK

ENGINEERING TIC

c
[
[

]
II
]

Sophioiiores Outnumbered Three
One By Victors Who Make
Four Of Five Aoints

To

ROCOE A. DAVID
JAMES G.'McKIL
FRANCIS A. NOR
I)EDIC VICE P
EDWARD K. ISB
E GIFFORD UPJ

2,000 WATCHSTRUGGLE'
Outnumbered more than three to
one, and with the defeat in Friday's
tug-of-war as a handicap, the sopho-
mores went down to defeat after a
bitterly contested struggle with the
first year men yesterday morning at
Ferry field in the annual Spring games.
The final score of the games, countingi
the two points for the tug-of-war,
gave the class of '30 a four to one
advantage.
The first event of the morning, the
relay race, resulted successfully for
the sophomores when the ten steeple-
chasers, running in relay, beat the
freshmen by a considerable margin.
Eight feet barriers and barrels con-
stituted the obstacles, and the last
seven men hurdled the barrels rather
than going through them. The class
of '29 took the event by about a,
quarter of a lap.
Later events proved, however, that
the point won in the obstacle relayI
was to be the only score of the game
for the sophomores. The cane spree,
with 11 men from each side was next
and when the smoke of battle had
cleared away it was found that the
green youths had garnered eight of,
the canes. Two were won by the
sophomores and the eleventh was a
tie.

C
[

]
]

Student Co
(All Men vo
PRESIDEN
(Vote for O

C
[

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]

COURTLAND C.I
JOHN T. SNODGI

S'ENIOR REL'REWE

(Vote for Thr

t
t
L

]
]
]
]
]
]
I'

GEORGE ANNABL
WAYNE COWELL
CHARLES GILBE
ROBERT HALSTE
JOHN HEDRICK
LEO HOFFMAN
ELLIS MERRY
RUSSELL SAUER

L J J: N1Ni: . HINAL RLIPORTIS ADt iin efeating .Purdue Wednesda
LLE [ ] STEPHAN E. JONES _ _getting five hits in the closing innin
E Illini Scores Early
SECRETARY Presentation of awards, election of I i Scores wo rs
'SE 4CRZET Illinois scored two runs int
officers, committee reports and two f second inning, largely as a result
E IRES. [ ] LAURA SOULE technical lectures wound up the the tumbling exhibition staged
DSON [ ] HILDA M. EVANS - Michigan Interscholastic Press asso- Puckelwartz and Corriden in th
LEN, JR. ciation convention here yesterday pursuit of Finn's long drive to cen
QUIST TREASURER caonn. cnntio h yter ay field. Stewart, the Illini pitcher, h
morning. In the afternoon many of singled through second after onec
the delegates attended the majorsngdthohsendatroe
ES. [ ] PAUL J. I1 N the deateais aend e te maor when Finn drove a long single to h
. [ ] WALTER NORRIS sport attractions and late in the af- center. Puckelwartz allowed the N
EY ternoon most of the more than 300 to bound past him and Corrid
OHN deleasattending the convention standing behind the Michigan capta
wereteigo' ks stumbled around long enough to
At 8 o'clock an illustrated en- low Stewart to score and FinV
B rdgCrtringfeature was given in NattiralN reach third base. Dorn then hit a to
Board in ControlofS c auditorium by Palmer Booth- fly to Neblung in right field and F
)uncil Student Publications Company, the Jahn and OrEngraving scored on the play when Neblu
-Comany, Chicago. The process of threw the ball almost into the stan
) making cuts was pictured from the In the fourth inning Sweeney1
te) (Entire Capus Vote) beginning until the final factory proof one of Miller's curves far enough i
is made. left field to allow him t~ make a hor
T (Vote for Three' E. C. Oakes of the Horton-Beimer run. Paul followed with a sin
Press of Kalamazoo addressed the through short and went to second
rie) [ ] CASSAM A. WILSON I general assembly in the Union at 10 hh ot, but tho
[ ] FRANCIS A. NORQUIST 'o'clock on the subject, "The Three otat s hoelatebut was thro
SMITH [ ] GEORGE H. ANNABLE Essentials of a Successful School ut at the home plate when Oosterba
RASS [ ] THOMAS J. DO]JGALL Paper." Leadership, organization and up Kisk an error by finally r
[ ] GEORGE E. MONROE fnnewr etoe steefc ing up Kusinski's grounder and thro,
[ ] GEORGEW . MONRO I finance were mentioned as these fac-( ing to Davis on a questionabled
NTATIVES [ ] MATTHEW J.HUDSON (tors by Mr. Oakes.toDvsna utoabe
N'TATIVES ] LOUIS F. KNOEPP tr yMr ae.cisio>V.
"Lighthouse," the Port Huron high
ee) choo paer, as lectd t theof- After the feeble Wolverine threat
ree) school paper, was elected to the of-i the sixth, Illinois increased its 3 to
fice of President of next year's con- h lead with two morearuns in the s
LE vention in the elections. The vice- e Fin h t sae agin h
Loardl in Control of 'presidency was awarded "Maroon and .
RT 0a ", Holland H stopped at second on Dorn's sh
EAD Athletics the office of secretary-treasurer went single. Finn scored and Dorn we
iiiiilc ~ h offce f screary-reaure wen I o tirdwhen Miller juggled OostE
to "Optimist", Ann Arbor High school. toi baan's toss to first in attempting
The following loving cups were lansts ofrti tepig
(Entire Campus Vote) The f ing loving cps werst put out Gribble. Sweeney's hit bou:
awared the paprss apturing firewst ed off of second base and Dorn scor
!ENIOR :REPRESENTATIVE placerin the various fields of news- Gribble reaching third. An attemp
papering: Annuals class A: DetroitI
TATVES(n Northeastern, Crucible; class B, Port double steal by Gribble and Sween
(Vote for One) failed when Davis faked a throw
.[e] r Huron, Student; monthlies: class A:
ee) i Michigan high school, "Said and second and trapped Gribble off
Roon'; class B, Muskegon Heights, third base. Gribble was run do
S[ ] oDone'; -c kss s s Aneghtsafter considerable jockeying alongt
[ Mo;bi-weeklies : class A, Detroit bs ie
N ( Central, Central Student; class B, Wo r s e. i
Y Holland High school, Maroon and;M Wolverines Score- in Eighth
E' JUNIOR REI; ESEN TATIVE [Orange; weeklies: class A, Highland.k
Park, Snectator; class B, Saginaw!Iinning and scored one lone run
(Vote for One) Eastern, student Lantern. The large a walk to Loos, Weintraub's single
Ssilver tronhy cup donate by the right center, and Morse's infield o
[] Dearborn Indeendent was awardedthreatened gain
to Detroit Northeastern for acquiring gahemunon firsta dinhird.
the most points in the total awards. Mmichigan
LTReports from the various commit- ABHR
ERLANSO N LEA VE TODA Y .tees were heard. Cassam A. WilsonAB H1R 0
' L oos, l' . .. . .. .4 0 1 0
LAP OF ARCTIC JOU RINEY '27, general chairman of the conven- W ....u... 0 1
(tion and editor of the Michigan Inter- t4'. 0 1
scholastic Press Bulletin, gave a re- Morse, ss ..............4 2 0 3
liminary ar- Ann Arbor today to confer with Dr. port on the paper, urging that there Corriden, if.............4 0 0 1
rid of a series I Hobbs and other members of the ex- be a greater interest and correspond- I uekelwartz, cf........4 0 0 2
Michigan ex- ! pedition. The two men will make E ing increase in circulation next year. Oosterbaan, lb.........4 ( 0 10
Prof. William their living quarters in a hut 9 by 14 Theta Sigma, honorary journalistic Neblung, rf...........4 1 0 5
y department, feet for eight months, where they hope i sorority gave a tea in Martha Cook Davis, e...............4 0 0 4
ns, will leave by meteorological observations to de- dormitory for the women delegates Miller, p..............4 2 0 1
rk today, ac- termine the source and causes 9f the t attending the convention in the after- ~~ ~~ -
anson of the blizzards which sweep down on North noon, the last scheduled event onthisI o '' 27
quipmemt for America and the North Atlantic, men- year's program after the assembly A
mng loaded on- acing the steamship lanes of the pres- I was formally adjourned at noon. AB H H 0
n which the I ent and the nrosnective air transn or- ili, ss ..............5 ' 2 2

by
gs.
the
of
by
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ter
had
out
eft
all
ain,
al-
to
ng
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ung
lds.
hit
into
me
gle
on
wn
aan-
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Ow-
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ev-
and
ort
uent
er-
to
aid-
red
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to
of
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the
hth
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ut.
in
chi-

Schraesand Establishes New Record
in :Discus Throw By Exceeding
lnoyle's Former Mark
Taking nine first places, tieing for
first in another, and scoring slams in
two events, the Michigan track team
defeated Iowa yesterday afternoon by
a score of 78 to 57 in the first Big
Ten outdoor dual meet of the season
for the two schools. One Ferry field
record was broken.
The Wolverines trailed the Hawk-
eyes through the greater part of the
meet, never having the lead from the
second event -to the twelfth when
SMaizeand Blue runners took all three
places in the half mile to bring the
score to 56-52 in favor of Michigan.
Good Marks Feature
To have three men on the same
team making throws of better than
140 feet and two of them more than
150 feet in the hammer wasone of
the outstanding features of then meet,
The Michigan slam was even more
of an accomplishment in view of the
fact that three Iowa nien placed in
the national collegiate meet last year.
Ketz, won yesterday with a mark of
153 feet 1-2 inch, while Campbell
turned in the best performance of
his college career to take second with
152 feet.
Ted Hornberger completely aveng-
ed his defeat by Hunn, in the Con-
ference indoor meet by leading the
Hawkeye distance star to the tape by
25 yards yesterday. At the half mile
mark Hunn and Hornberger were in
second and third place, at the mile,
however, the Iowa pace setter drop-
ped out, and the race resolved itself
into a two man duel, and at the end
of six laps Wuerful was the only run-
ner left. After trailing close on
Hunn's heels for the entire race,
Hornberger opened up a sprint on the
last turn that carried him to the tape
a winner by a wide margin In 9:45.
The time at the half was 2:18, and at
the mile, 4:49.
Jack Lovette, with firsts in the
javelin and shot put, was high point
man of the meet. Everingham was
next with nine points scored on a first
in the 220 yard dash, a second in the
100. and a third in the broad jump.
Northrop, Cuhel, and Hester each took
a first and a second.
Lovette Wins Shot Put
His mark of 46 feet 5 inches in the
shot was the best performance Lo-
vette has ever turned in, his best pre-
vious record being 44 feet 10 inches.
Capt. Phil Northrop did not compete
in the javelin, throw because of a
'sore arm, but Lovette's throw of 179
feet 1-4 inch was 10 feet more than
that of the best Hawk entry.
Schravesand made a new, Ferry
field record for the discus on his first\
throw, 142 feet 2 inches. This super-
seded Doyles mark of 141 feet 1 inch,
made last year.
A slight wind blowing from the
southeast made good times in the
runs difficult, but Baird ran the 440
yard dash in :49.6 in spite of it. It
was a notable feature that Mueller
and Ohlheiser of Michigan who fin-
ished second and third did under :50.
The hurdle races brought a direct
reversal of dope when Cooper ran a
great race in the 220 yard lows to
beat Cuhel out Jt the tape after fin-
ishing third to Allison and Cuhel in
the highs where he was favored to
win. Cooper's time of :24.4 in the lows
was very good in view of the wind.
Hester Takes Dash
Buck Hester took the 100 yard dash
from Everingham of Iowa by more
' than a yard, but lost to hin in the 220
in a blanket finish a few minutes
later. Scarcely a yard separated the
first three men in the event. Lasser
took third in both races.
The broad jump resulted in Ever-
ingham, winner of the event at the
Kansas Relays, being defeated by
Dahem, a comparatively unknown
Wolverine who took second. Northrop
won with a lean of 22 feet 10 1-2

inches. The captains' duel in the pole
vault resulted in a victory for Boyles
of Iowa at 12 feet 8 3-4 inches.
E4lliot won a comparatively unin-
teresting race in the mile in the time
|of 4:29.8.
Summaries of the Iowa-Michigan

JUNIOR REPRESEN
(Vote for Thr

TO HEAD DOCTERS The last event of the program was
the rope tying contest, when each
Dr. Alfred S. Warthin, professor of 1 member of both classes was supplied
>athology in the medical school, was with a pair of 18 inch ropes and at the
elected president of the Association sound of the gun the classes started
of American Physicians at the meet- to tie each other up and place them
ing of that body which was held last,"1 the pens. The sophomores, who
week in Atlantic City. This associa- numbered less than, 200, waited forI
ion is the most limited medical so- the freshmen close to their own pen,J
city in the country, having a mo- faIr across the field, and about five ofJ
wership of only 200 professional men. the fifteen minutes allowed for the
But two members of the University event passed before the green warriors
faculty have ever held this position crossed the field.
before Dr. Warthin, those being Dr. With the superior numbers of the'
Victor C. Vaughan, former dean of freshmen the contest soon turned into
te medical school, amid IDr. George, a riot, and the final score of the event
ock. was 57 to 28 in favor of the first year
Dr. C. V. Weller, professor of path- men.
ology, was elected full member in the This is the fourth consecutive de-
aw:soCiation at the same meeting. I feat in the interclass struggles for
<thbr members on the faculty in- the the class of '29, since they were
c-lude Dr. F. G. Novy, Dr. C. W. Ee- beaten both in the spring and fall
rds, amid Dr. Louis Newburgh. iof their freshman year and again in
A, the meting of the American as- the fall of the sophomore year.
,,oC1W n of the International Med- A crowd of more than 2,000 stu-
sicl; iOi ciehe intntial ty, dents and townspeople witnessed theI
ical i story Soeciy in Atlantic City, -ae.
Dr. arthin was made semior mem- g_
her of t le council and Dr. Weller ___
was elected acting secretary. 3
I C(ONFERENCE SCORES y

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7I
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DURWIN ALGYE
FREI) ASBECK
JOHN GILMART-I
HARLAN CHRIST
GEORGE HUBBLE
JOHN KIANE
JOHN KNIGHT
EDWARD WACHS

!HOBBSAND
ON FIRST
After months of pre
rangements for the seco
of three University of1
peditions to Greenland,I
H. Hobbs, of the geology
director of the expeditio
Ann Arbor for New Yor
companied by C. O. Erl
1botany department. Eq
the expedition is now bei
to the Frederick VII o
two will sail Tuesday for
The remaining six me
expedition, R. L. Belknap
ogy department, S. P.I
the Weather Bureau, J
meterologist, C. R. Kall
gist, Fred Herz, photo
P. C. Oscanyan, radio o
leave New York on May
meet Professor Hobbs in

Copenhagen.
mbers of the
p, of the geol-
Fergusson of
. E. Church,1
quist, aerolo-
grapher, and
Dperator, will
18 and will
Copenhagen'

tation lanes of the future.I
The Michigan expendition will have
the co-operation of the three other
meteorological stations during the
! summer in its work of weather fore-
( casting[. A Rumanian expedition,i
aided financially by funds from theI
University, will be located near Ang-
magssalik, on the southeast coast of
SGreenland.The Oceonographic So-

I MICHIGAN WINS AT GOLF
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., May 7-Michigan
came out on the big end of a 14 1-2
ito 19 1-2 score in the golf meet with
the University of Illinois here today.
Captain Glover of the Michigan squad
.turned n some nice shots to give
'Michigan the lead and a victory at!

Dorn, If.
G undlach, lb
Gribble, rf
Sweeney, cf ..
Paul, 31) .....
Shaw, 2b ....
Kusinski, c ..
Stewart, p ...

..........4
., . ... . .. .. . 4
..........4

",
0
1.
2
1
1
0
1

1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1

1
10
0
2
1
4
7
0

BROWN-"JIalf of
well-imeaning parents
ough not to go," is

the boys who
send to college
the declaration

Baseball
Iowa 3, Minnesota 1.
Puridue~1. Ohio Sate11.

36 12 6 27 111

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