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April 24, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-04-24

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ESTABLISHED
1890,

it 41

ti

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVIL No. 145

TEN PAGES

ANN ARDOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 1927

TEN PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

- I

CAMBRIDGE AUTHORITY
WILL LECTURE TWICE
UNDER' COIFAUSPICES
SPECIALIST 1N INTERNATIONAL
LAW WILI, TALK FIRST
ON LOCARNO PACT
WILL ADDRESS BANQUET
Alexander P. Higgins, Veteran British
Professor, Will Be honored
At Annual Affair
Under the auspices of Coif, honorary
legal society, Alexander Pierce Hig-
gins, Whewell professor of inter-
national law at Cambridge university,
will give the first of a series of two
public talks on "the Locarno settle-
ment" at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in Room C of the Law build-
ing. The second lecture will be given
at the same time and place Tuesday
afternoon on "International Relations
and International Law."
Professor Higgins will also deliver
a speech at the annual Coif banquet,
which will be held tomorrow evening
and at which he will be the guest of
honor. The initiation ceremony for the
law students recently elected to Colf
was held Friday' afternoon in the of-
fices of Dean Henry M. Bates, of the
Law school, with Dean Bates pre-
siding. Monday's talk will be the an-
nual law lecture that is arranged for
the campus by the Coif society.
Celebrates Birthday
Professor Higgins today celebrates
his sixty-second birthday. He prepared
at Cathedral (King's) School, aZid com-!
pleted his education at Downing col-
lege, Cambridge, where he won the
"scholar" honor. In 1887 he passed the
Law society's final examination admit-'
ting him to the bar. Since his gradua-
tion, Professor Higgins has won prac-
t ically all the degrees possible to a
worker in his field of study.
During the years 1914-1920 Profes-
sor Higgin acted as advisor in inter-
national and prize law in the depart-
ments of the procurator-general and
the treasury-solicitor. Directly fohow-!
ing the Armistice he was appointed
advisor to the admiralty on interna-
tional law for the Peace conference.
Since 1920 lie has held his present
position at Cambridge, but he also'
gave courses at the University of Lon-
don from 1919 to 1923. In 1917 he was
elected president of the Society of Pub-
lic teachers of Law, which office he
held one year. He was elected in 1911
a corresponding member of the l'Insti-
tut de Droit Compare' and in 1920 a
member of the F'Institut de Droit In-
ternational.
Has Written Extensively
The first of Professor Higgins' many
books appeared in 1898 entitled "Em-1
ployers Liability on the Continent".
One of Professor Higgins more well
known works is "The Law of Nations
and the War", which was published
in 1914. Professor Higgins edited the
seventh and eighth editions of Hall's
International Law series. Professor
Higgins has also written many ar-
ticles for leading English law period-
icals, including the Quarterly' Law
review and the Quarterly Chronicle.
Ile has served for the past seven years
as co-editor of the British Year-Book.
Since the death of Prof. Lasa Op-
penheim, formerly of Oxford, Profes-1
sor Higgins has generally been con-
sidered the leading British authority
on international law. For the past few
months lie has been making a lecture
tour of the leading law schools in
this country, including Harvard and
Illinois.
INOTICE{

The Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications wilL holds its
meeting for the appointment of
Managing Editor and Business
Manager of The Michigan Daily,
the Michanensian, and Gar-
goyle on May 2, 1927. Each appli-
cant for a position is requested
to file seven copies of his letter
of application at the Board office
in the Press building not later
than April 29 for the use of the
members of the board. Carbon
copies, if legible, will be satis-j
factory. Each letter should state
the facts as to the applicant's
scholastic record in the Univer-
sity, his experience upon the "
1 publication or elsewhere so far
as it may have any bearing upon
his qualifications for the posi-
tion sought, and any other facts
which the applicant may deem 1
relevant.
R E. R. SUNDERLAND

Value Of Rolling Stock Soars Rapidly
When Students Take To Use Of Skates

By TimothyHay
"If we can't ride, we'll roll," seems
to be the philosophy of students seen
yesterday on campus rushing along on
roller skates, evidently in protest of
the proposed ruling of the Regents
banning student autos.
The stadium on the diagonal was a
favorite skating rink, and students
welcomed the move that found some
use for the white benches. Edward I
C. Pardon, superintendent of the build- I
ings and grounds department, said last
night that as far as he knows there is
no rule against skating on the cam-
pus walks, although bicycles are bar-
red.
Hardware stores reported last night
that they were completely sold out
of skates and were ordering additional
supplies by express. One store report-
ed that in one hour they sold more
than a dozen pair, and that one frat-
ernity bought six pairs in a single
lot.
Students living in the outskirts of
the city will have to buy buggies, since
skating in from a distance would mean
hot-boxes. Hitching post will have
to be established on campus and spe-
cial racks made to hold roller skates
in the classrooms.
PRESIDENT COMMS
ON STUDENT VEICLES
Little Declares Attitude Of Student
Body May Cause Banning Of
Cars From Campus
ARGUMENTS ARE LISTED'
Further comment on the action
which may be taken to ban student-
owned automobiles as a result of the
accident of Thursday morning in
which one student was killed, and'
three others seriously injured, was
made yesterday by President Clarence
Cook Little. Stating that he believed
automobiles eventually would be ban-
ned from the campus because of the
general attitude of the student body
rather than any direct acts, President
Little said that he thought no admin-
istrative move in enforcing the pres-
ent ruling would suffice. The facts
he presented were as follows:
"1. A number of the students have,
after their co-operation has been re-
quested failed to carry out either the
spirit or the letter of the University
rules.
"2. The number is sufficiently
large to show that regulations would
involve a very large overhead of paid
officials, special police inspectors,
plain clothes men, and other agents
usually employed where a group of
any size is interested in defying the
rules of the community as a whole.
"3. The University has neither the
money to divert from purposes of edu-
cation, nor at present the will so to
divert it, to make such a system of
police a part of its problems.
"4. The reckless driving, disregard
of others on the road, overloading
I I
( NEVER BAN STUDENT CARS! I
Read The Daily's editorial onI
the automobile situation on page
I four of this issue.
i I.(
of cars, disregarding of stop street
signs, and infraction of parking rules
by many student drivers imperil not
only the" lives o those genial but
thoughtles offenders,but also the
safety of innocent bystanders and
travelers.
1"5. Personal habits which reach
out and afflict a community instead
of being confined to the person are
out of date and out of place in a Uni-
versity community or any other social

group. Carelessness, thoughtlessness,
and other sometimes lovable qualities
become grim and menacing when one
allows the individuals so affected a
high-powered death dealing implement
with which to play.".
President Little said that the issue
would be decided on other questions
than "the paternalism which seemed.1
to chafe" the student body, the most
important one of which would be pub-
lic safety. He pointed out that the
S present rules had been a failure in
that all students who have been in
trouble with the police have been
those who were ineligible to be driv-1
ing a car.
Coroner Edward C. Ganzhorn re-
ported yesterday that no inquest
would be held concerning the acci-
dent, which resulted in the death of

Perhaps the R. O. T. C. will be
called out to handle the traffic tangles'
that are sure to result at the inter-
sections of the walks. Rules and reg-
ulations will be necessary, and if you
see any members of the Student coun-
cil ask them what they are going to
do about it, please.
A good pair of skates costs $2, ac-
cording to storekeepers. As yet local
merchants haven't imported any rub-I
ler tired models such as have been1
sln in other college communities

BLAST IN AUTOMOB-ILE
BODY FACTORY TAKES
KNOWN TOLL 0OFTWO
DETROIT CONCERN GUTTED BY
FIRE AND EXPLOSION OF
SUDDEN ORIGIN
BUILDING DESTROYED
Cause Of Destruction Undetermined;
Installed Sprinkler System
IN1 . rI l j n:Y

where skating is popular. These new
skates have larger wheels, with only
one in the rear on a pivot, and it is (By Associated Press)
said that a higher rate of speed can DETROIT, April 23.-With two
be maintained. known dead, and the death of some
Athletic officials hve not as yet an-2otherkntwo hos lerected,
nounced intramural skating races, but o the blackened and smoldering ruins
they ought to have them. No ruling B rithenfietorildin o
has been madie as to whether students Briggs Manufacturing company to-
has eenmad as o wethr stdens nght held the solution of whether
who get a speed equal to that of an others met death in a fire kindled by
auto out of their skates will be hail- sy
I a series of explosions, which destroy-
ed up for driving without one of these he structure early toda
student auto permitstaJames Gillen, who died shortly after
The skating fad was started at -the his admittance to Receiving hospital,
University of Illinois, and spread to admittan , to ivi hial,
other colleges in Illinois and to Prince- non,ry constituteotheknown dead. Both
ton, as a protest against rules banning vwere Negroes
automobiles at the respective colleges. gstimates High
Estimates of the number of dead
ran as high as from 50 to 100, al-
though J. W. Carter, head of the serv-
ice department, announced late today
i tat a check of the employment rec-
rids aecounted for all the 200 men
[LOO ' ,mp~loyed in the burned buildIing. More
than 2,500 are employed inalldepart-
Others Wait in Precarious Positions b;ey frm, latn autombil-
While Augmented Forces body several build-
igs.
Strengthen Dykes The total number of injured was es-
timated unofficially at 100 or more.
RIVER STEAMERS USED This number includes scores, less
________seriously injured, who received first
(By Associated Press) aid treatment at the two hospitals and
>EMHI,'Tnn.,A '' T the company's offices and returned to
MEMP HIS, T'enn., pnra 28.-Thous- Itheir homes.
ands of those made homeless by flood te rs oieioss.
waters of the Mississippi river and its The fire originattd on the third
tributaries were carried to safety to- floor of the building after the first
day while still other thousands await- blast in the painting department.
ed succor. Many were in precarious Workers in other parts of the build- I
positions on levees and promontories, ing filed out calmly when a fire alarm
or were clinging to trees or to the system was sounded.
roofs of houses .and barns. Several workers on the third floor,
Although every possible agency for including three women, were rescued
rescuers was brought into play, the by a s'quad headed by Edward Sten-
death list continued to mount, reach- con, 26, a foreman.
ing beyond the 60 mark, and there John French, president of the com-i
were unconfirmed reports that up- pany, estimated the loss In the mil-
wards of 150 had perished. lions.
As the flood waters, pouring through
the crevasse at Stots Landing above Va t T Be ts
Greenville, Miss., pushed on across
the delta, new towns were inundated, Detroit Tennis Club
among them Leland, and the millions
in property damage already wrought
from Illinois and Missouri on the j Michigan opened its 1927 tennis sea-
north to Arkansas and Mississippi son with a victory over the Detroit
was steadily increasing. Tennis club yesterday afternoon, the
While small armies strengthened score being 7-5. Barton, sophomore
the dykes on the lower Mississippi in star, and Captain Olian won in both
Louisiana, augmented forces were set singles and doubles. The Michigan
to work rescuing the marooned and men took five of the eight singles en-
moving to more advantageous places, counters and split even in four dou-
those who had been taken to river I bles matches.
towns. The summary of the matches fol~
lows: Singles-Barton, Michigan, de-
FIRST YEAR MEN feated Davis, 8-6, 6-3; Olian, Mich-
igan, defeated Jerome, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3;
TO HOLD MEETING Moore, Michigan, defeated Maxwell,
- 16-14, 6-2; Wolfendon, Detroit, de-
In preparation for the Spring games, feated Finkleman, 9-7, 1-6, 6-3; Mar-
s..-- 'hall Michi an defeated Kell 7-5

E
'
ill
I
'

Place Of Meiklejohn ULfl!fi L
At First Convocation BY 10-7 SCOEIN S
President Clarence Cook Little will I
give the address at the opening serv-
ice of the third series of student con- ACKsr gUaMLdi-
vocations this morning in Hill audi-, RE I IEF
torium in view of the inability of Dr.
Alexander Meiklejohn, of the Univer- Northrop, Cooper Take Two Titles
sity of Wisconsin, to speak here today. Each; Hester Defeats Rriss
A telegram was received at the Pres- 1 In 100 Yard Dashi
ident's office yesterday stating that
Dr. Meikle.ohn had suddenly con- TWO RELAY TEAMS PLACE
tracted neuralgia and would bunable
to keep his Ann Arbor engagement. (By Associated Press)
The convocation committee immedi- COLUMBUS,0 ., April 23 -Near
ately invited President Little to make freezing winds sweeping down into
the address, and 1i0,accepted. Ohio's stadium sped shivering ath-
"Student Responsibility" is the sub- letes over the cinder track, and many I
Ject which the President has chosen ' records fell by the wayside at the
for his address. It is understood that fourth annual Ohio Relays here to-I
hie may discuss the automobile situa- da
tion, among other matters, in connec- Siyt
tion with the theme of his talk.tablishxed and one old record was tied.
The service will begin promptly at Trhe two special events, 120 yards
11 o'clock. John Snodgrass, '28E, jun- j low and high hurdles, in which former
ior Student council representative, Captains Werner and Kir, cy, Illi-
will presider s nis; Guthrie, Ohio State and Brick-
Time program follows: man, Chicago, competed, failed to pro-
Organ prelude-Intermezzo from i duce a new mark, however. Werner
"Cavalleria Rusticana". .Mascagni{carried off the honors in the high
Mr. Dalies Frantz 'stakes amd Kinseyimthloons
Hymn-"Glorious Things of Thee sosa erin the lw ones.
Are poke"..........AusriaWlvrines Ln Form
Are Spoken"..........Austria Western Conference universities took
Congrcgr tion Little off the bulk of the honors in the uni-
Praer .ry S...-" P d eW i l e versity division. Michigan was well to
Afroy AlTers"....F. Willxipeto1 the fore, wining five events, the 100
Away All Tears". .. . I. Flaxington I yard dash, 120 yard high hurdlesI
H arke r , 220 yard low hurdles, broad jump and
Mr. Robert Graham i javelin trow. Michigan State pla-
Address--"Student Rlesponsibility"ed in the university division because
President Little of its unusually strong team, copped
Benedictioninhigh honors in the triathlon, 880 yard
Organ Prelude-"Grand Chaeur iii relay, and second in the pole vault.
C.......m......Chamvet Iuninaries:
Mr. Frantz Discus throw: Won by Anderson,
. Cornell; Welch, Pittsburgh, second;
MAJESTIC PICTURE A1ma, Micia Saenormaal, thid.'
MAJESTIC PICTURE ~DaSaistance147z feet, 10 3-4n ches. (For-l
IS BURNED DURING ier record 135 feet, 7 inches by Munz,
AFTERNOON SI-HOWl Michigan).
100-yard dash: Won by Hester
yMichigan; Kriss, Ohio State, second;
By 'imothy kHay Wubucas, Pittsburgh, third. Time:
The bully trad just knocked out I:99
Gilda Gray's brother, when fire in the f 9 H
projection booth stopped the show at Pittsburgh;:Ketz, Michigai, second;
the Majestic theater yesterday after- Shively, Illinois, third. Distance: 162
noon. Quick work on the part of the feet 1-2 inch (Former record by
operator on duty, Ralph Aukerman, Taylor, Pennsylvanmia,156 feot 2
1105 Church street, put out the fire, I inches).
but not before two reels of the feature o i relay Won by Ohio State
filn were destroyed, and the sight of =Two mue
the flame and smoke had driven more Michigan, second. Time: 8 min. 6-10
thelam ahndrsmohadiven'tore sec. (Former record by Georgetown
than a hundred people out of the uiest,8mn e.
balconmy, iin orderly fashion. Iuniversity, 8 mm. 8 sec.)
Thconrgannsorderaon.ly ayd y Hop, step and jump: Won by Simon,
The organist heroically played every I Illinois; Meislahn, Illinois, second;
tune she knew while students cheered'
on the firemem and demanded more IHeinrichs, Dennison, third. Distance:
of the pictre .e n e an e o eI 45 ft. 1 in.
of the picture Mile team race: Won by Wisconsin;
In his efforts to put out the fire, Minnesota, second; Ohio State, third.
Aukerman was burned on his hands Tinme: 4 mn. 35.6 se.
and face, and his hair, was singed. 880-yard relay: Won by Michigan
Te doctor who trethat the injury was limited to minor State; Indiana, second, Illinois, third.
that te as Time: 1 min. 31 2-5 sec.{
b~urns on tihe face.12yadhg hule: Wnb
Gilda Gray, in "Cabaret", had just120 yard high hurdles: Won by
Cooper, Michigan; Irwin, Ohio State,
finished one reel of her adventures second; Palmeyer, Wisconsin, third.
when the film broke, according to the Time: 15 6-10 sec.s
operator, and in the resulting fire St p: Won6-y0ewe
two reels were lost. Although these I Shot put: Won by Lewis, Northwes-
were omitted from the matinee br-tern; Anderson, Cornell, second; Lo-
~orm ie, romhr telaine te sae vette, Michigan, third. Distance: 46 ft.,
formance, another release of the same41-In(Frercod5ft138
picture was secured from Detroit in 4 1-2 in, (Former record 45 ft. 1 3-8
timefor he eenin shosin. by Lyon, Ilinois)-
time for the evening shows. High jump: Won by Burg, Chicago;
T Brunk, Drake, second; Pinney, Otter-
TICKE T SALE FOR bein college, third. Height, 6 ft.,
PLAY WILL OPEN'5 7-8 n.
Distance medley relay: Won by Ohio
State; Illinois, second; Indiana, third.
Tickets for all of the 15 showings rime: 10 min. 43 sec. (Former record
of the Rockford Players, who will by Illinois, 10 min. 46 4-10).
come here May 3 for a series of per- 220 yard low hurdles: Won by Coop-
formances under the direction of Rob- 22icyan; IwindOhionbytCose-
ert endrson '2, wil g on aleer, Michigan; Irwin, Ohio State, see-
Sert Henderson, '26, will go on sale Iond; Penquite, Drake, third. Time:
tomorrow at all of the State street 24 8-10 sec.
bookstores, it was announced yester- Pole vault: Won by Pickard, Pitts-
day at thme office of tihe Alumnae burgh; McAtee, Michigan State, sec-
council in Alumni Memorial hall. od; BrwAOi t,. thia.eHeigh
The players will give a series of five 13 ft. (Former record, 12 ft.H 3 1-4 in.
repertory plays, each to be repeated 1yt.(orer rcord,
three times for the total of '15 per- r___...___..-

Javin thr by Northrop
formances. The same plays will not Icn tow: Wo byaN ,
be given on successive nights.d Michigan; Stone, Ohio Wesleyan, see-
All seats for the performances are ond; Bartlett, Albion college, third.
priced at 75 cents, and course tickets Distance: 194 ft., 6 in. (Former rec-
for the entire repertoire of five plays ord by Kreuz, Wisconsin 193 ft. 9 1-2
will be priced at $3.00. In.).

Little Will Talk InMl innrWrerrnu IIIiirflEECATO lIfIfIFD '

PLUUIII JIU iu I LlIL
IRSTS AT OHIO MEET

Ff.OND ARIP,1rM'AMr

Invaders Display Fine Baiting Form
As Michigan Defense Cracks
Early In Game
MILLER HITSHOME RUN
Michigan staged a poor exhibition
of so-called baseball on Ferry field
yesterday afternoon and went down
in defeat before the Northwestern
university nine, losing the second Con-
ference game by a score of 10 to 7.
The fine fielding that the Mich-
igan team displayed against Purdue
in the season opener was only a
pleasant memory yesterday, as the
Wolverines rolled and tumbled after
the 16 hits that the Northwestern
players earned off four of the Mich-
igan pitchers.
Fielding Is Rugged
At no time during the game, except
in the first inning, did Michigan loom
as a likely winner. Starting in the
second inning, when the Purple scor-
ed four runs, the ragged fielding of
the Wolverines, and their inability
to get to Mills, southpaw hurler, for
timely hits, definitely put an end to
the Michigan hopes of turning in its
first Conferenmce victory.
If Northwestern is to be regard-
ed as a comparatively weak team, it
certainly did not run true to its rep-
utation yesterday. Don Miller, Coach
Fisher's pitching ace, lasted little
more than an inning, in which time
Northwestern scored four runs before
Ruetz replaced him. Ruetz, who at
first seemled a capable relief mamn,
soon gave way under the perpetual
hammering of the invaders: and the
poor support afforded him by the
local team, especially by the infield.
Twelve hits were scored off Ruetz be-
fore Coach Fisher decided he had had
enough punishment, and sent Asbeck
to the mound in the eighth inning,
long after the home nine had lost
hopes of tieing the score.
The only redeeming feature of the
game for the Wolverines were the
two rallies in the seventh and eighth
innings, when they hit Mills and Pal-
mer freely, and gathered a total-of
six runs. After Morse had flied out,
McCoy, sent to bat in place of Ruetz,
reached first on an error by Izard, and
advanced to second on the overthrow.
Davis poled a long single to the out-
field, but McCoy tripped in rounding
third base, and was unable to score
on the play. Don Miller, who had been
placed in right field, after having
given up the pitching job, redeemed
himself for his poor start by poling
'a long hit to left center, and completed
the circuit on the blow, for the only
home run of the day.
After Morse had singled to start the
eighth, Neblung, pinch-hitting for As-
beck, singled to center, Morse stop-
ping at second. Palmer attempted to
catch Morse off second base, but Sol-
heim missed the throw, and the run-
ners advanced a base. Davis singled,
scoring Morse. Miller struck out, but
Loos walked, and Weintraub singled,
scoring Neblung and Davis. Puckel-
wartz struck out for the third out.
Box score:
MICHIGAN-

I

the second clash between the present
freshman and sophomore classes'
which will be held May 6and 7s
year, announcement of a freshman
pep meeting at 4 o'clock, Tuesday in
the Union ballroom, was made yester-
day by James Boyer, '27, chairman of
the Spring games committee.
Election of a captain to lead the
freshmen in the annual tug-of-war
over the Huron river on Friday after-
noon and in tie encounter with the
sophomores Saturday morning at south
Ferry field will take place at that time.
Lieutenants will be appointed later,
by tihe elected captain.
Boyer will outline the program of
events in the traditional freshman-s
sophomore struggle, and will explainj
the rules of the various contests.

, gll 1IU 16 l, U 1U U 11iy, -,
2-6, 8-6; Nagel, Michigan, defeated
McBrearty, 6-3, 6-4; Sheldon, Detroit,
defeated Goldsmith, 7-5, 7-5; Reindel,
Detroit, defeated Stephens, 6-3, 6-3.
In the doubles the Barton-Moore
and Olian-Finkleman combinations
scored the Michigan victories.
S. C. A. RECEIVES MONEY
FROM J-HOP PROCEEDS
More than ninety dollars has been
given to the Student Christian asso-
ciation by the J-Hop committee from
the profits of this year's junior social
affair. It is to be devoted to the sumi-
imer fresh air camp for the under-j
I privileged children of Ann Arbor,
-Jackson, and Detroit.

Al3
Loos, ss.............4
Weintraub, 3b.........2
Puckelwartz, cf ........4
Oosterbaan, 1b........5
Kubicek, 2b...........4
Morse, if.............5
dilbert, rf...........0
Davis, c.............. 4
Miller, p-rf...........4
Ruetz, P.............. 2
McCoy................ 1
Asbeck, P...........0
Gilmartin, p ...........0
Neblung ............. 1
36
NORTHWESTERN-
AB
Janetz, ef..........6
Solheim, 2b..........6
Kempf, If-............5
Johnsos, ss...........4
Vanderberg, c......... 4
Panosh, rf.5.........5
Mellick,1lb............4
Izard, 3b .............5
Mills, p.............. 4
Palmer, p.............1

. 1
1
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0
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2
1
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H
1
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'1
1
0
0
1

1
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8
7
0
U
0
0
0
0
(1

A
1
3
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0
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G

7 9 27 8

PRINCETON ACQUIRES CO-EDUCATION FOR SINGLE DAY
WHEN NUMEROUS PAPERS ARE SUCCESSFULLY HOAXED
-I

By Timothy Hay
Co-education at Princeton became
a reality for one day this month, in
the columns of The Daily and several
other papers of the country. It all
started when The Princetonian pub-
lished a big news story on page one
giving full details of a donation of
$20,000,000 for the establishment of
to-education at that center of all
that is masculine but talks and acts
Princetonian.

One of the members of The Daily
exchange desk came across the story
in the Princeton paper, and, realizing
that the fall of hallowed tradition to
say nothing of the $20,000,000, was an
item worthy of publication even in the
crowded columns of The Daily, duti-
fully reported it.
For the sensational news it con-
tained, it was indeed an insult that
the "scoop" was run on the inside
pages of The Daily, but that was
where it landed, on the principle that
nothing that hanened at Princetonf

just philosophy talks.1
And then, graduates of the shack
on the banks of Carnegie lake who'
are residing in Ann Arbor beganf
laughing, for they remembered that
it is a tradition of the Princetonian to
run one sensational story in perfect
seriousness every April 1. And this
was that.
Last year it was reported in that
paper that a ten-day vacation would
be declared immediately, but The
Daily, knowing college authorities as
it only too well does. would have

Mile relay: Won by Syracuse;
Michigan, second; Minnesota, third.
Time: 3 min. 24 sec.
Running broad jump: Won by North-
rop, Michigan; Simon, .Illinois, sec-
ond; Meislahn, Illinois, third. Dis-
tance: 33 ft., 7 5-8 in.
"ANNA CHRISTIE"
TO BE CONTINUED!
Due to the large demand for tickets
for all of the performances thus far,
is has been decided to continue
"Anna Christie," Mimes play, through-
out next week it was announced yes-
terday by officers of Mimes. The
drama has played to three capacity
houses so far and there are already

3
3
1
k
i
E
i
E
L

R
0
0
1
2
3
0
1
0
0

H
2
0
2
2
3
2
4
4
1
0

P
1
6
1
5
6
0
1
0

A
0
2
0
3
0
0
0
3
0

44 10 16 27 9
Summaries: Errors-Weintraub 3,
Morse, Johnsos, Palmer. Home run-
Miller. Three base hit-Johnsos. Two
base hit-Vanderberg. Sacrifices-
Weintraub, Mellick. Double play-Mills
Ito Solheim. Base on balls-Ruetz 2,

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