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April 08, 1927 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

PAGE EIGHT

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FRIDAY, APRIL ,, 192

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DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

0 MODERN PROSPEC TORS THRONG TRAIL TO WEE PAH, NEV. Ottoway Announces
LESEARC lul l ILI__Board Appointments
NDUSTRY &A NH Jttoad' .94.midnt of the
iN5 A S FIN TE _ 1 a 1UiI ul. I~~. o

Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. in. (,11:30 a. in. Saturdays). Copy must be typewritten.
VOLUME VII FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1927 \U1[BER 139
Faculty, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts:
Midsemester report cards are now being distributed through the Dean's
messenger service. Instructors are requested to report not later than April
21st the names of all students whose standing is at this time D or E. These
grades should not indicate merely the mark received on the midsemester
examination, if such an examination is given. More cards, if needed, can be
had at my office.
These cards should be used only for reprts of the work of students
enrolled in this College.
W. R. Humphreys, Asst. Dean.
Graduate Students: *
Graduate students, men and women, who expect to complete the require-
ments for degrees in June should order caps, gowns and hoods from George
Moe, 711 N. University Ave. The wearing of the hood is optional. Students
desiring to take part in Swing-out should order at once. Others may wait
until the opening of school after spring vacation.
Ruth A. Rouse, Recorder.
Health Service Dispensary:
The Health Service Dispensary will be open during vacation from 11 to
12 A. M. daily April 9 to April 17. On April 18 the Dispensary will be open
from 10 to 12 and 4 to 5
Warren E. Forsythe.
New York Times Current Events Contest:
I shall be in Room 2032 Angell Hall Friday morning from 10-12 to con-
sult with students who may desire information concerning the New York
Times Current Events Contest.
Fverett S. Brown.
No student in the College of Engineering will be allowed by the Hours
Committee to drop any subject without record after Friday, April 8.
T. R. Running
F. I. Finchi
. W. Boston
Hours Committee, College of Engineering.
University of Michigan Band:
There will be a rehearsals on Saturday and Sunday at 2 o'clock for all
men going on the Band Trip.
Norman J. Larson, Director.
Chinese Students' Club:
The last social meeting of the Club will be held in Wesley Hall this
evening at 7:30 sharp. Refreshments will be served after the games.
John Linn.
College of Literature, Seience and the Arts:
In making out elections, a student not infrequently is compelled to
substitute a second choice of courses for the ones he or she really wants,
because two or more of the desired courses are announced to meet at the
same hour. This notice- is a request, made both to students and to faculty,
to notify me of the existence of such conflicts. Any student who thinks he
sees conflict facing him next year, and any faculty member who knows of
courses that often cause, conflicts, is asked to make note of the courses in-
volved, address the note to me, and drop it in any campus messenger box.
Dean Effinger has asked me to make a study of this problem ,in the hope
that some of the conflicts occurring most frequently, particularly conflicts
in required subjects in combination courses, may begeliminated
D. L. Rich.
To All University Women:
The committee in charge of the rummage book sale to be given by the
Board of Representatives April 26, 27, 28, 29, and 30 for the benefit of the
Women's league, requests that each Univtrsity woman bring back from vaca-
tion at least one book which she would be willing to contribute. Books will
be collected from all houses the week after vacation.
Dorothy Allison, General Chairman.
Senior.Engners:
Orders for invitations and announcements will be taken this afternoon
from 1 to 5 o'clock ovr in the Engineering Arch. This is the final date.
Invitation Committee.
J. A. Ardussi.
Striking Coincidence Of Simultaneous
Notes Gave Rise To Delta Sigma Rho
There occurred, in Nov., 1904, one honor fraternity. Prof. E. E. McDer-
of those striking coincidences which
form the basis for a belief in tele- Mott of the University of Minnesota
pathy. Almost at the same hour two and Prof. H. E. Gordon, of the Uni-
letters were posted, each suggesting .
to the writer of the other the forma- versity of Iowa, were the two prim
tion of an intercollegiate forensic ciples in this incident.

nin~e'ring IProtf)J' Says Uniiersity
S eork Out Of Proportion' To
State itnstrial Position
MORE FUNDS NECESSARY
That the work of the University in
industriail research is sadly out of
proportion to the industrial position
of the state, Prof. A. E. White, direc-
tr of the dcpartment of Ar'gr.i:erin g
,research, stated in cornmen.Ing on the
*lresent day status of indust; ial Mich-
an. Also, a lack of fund pi events
an7thing like an adequate us of the
reseach facilities of the University, ac-
ing to Professor White.
"The rapid growth of industry, par-
ticularly in a section -of the country
such as Michigan, means that increas-
ed support should be made available
to the University for carrying out a
more extensive program of scientific
research," declared Professor White.
r"The change which is taking place
in the state is well evidenced by cen-
sus figures," pointed out Professor
1White. "in 1909, the various Michigan
industries employed 231,499 wage
earners and produced manufactured
products valued at $685,109,000. In
1919, an increase of approximately 100
percent in the number of workers
showed a resultant increase of more
than 500 percent in the value of the
products manufactured.
"In contrast to this, the rural pop-
ulation of Michigan showed an in-
crease of less than four percent, while
the number of farms decreased about
four percft. The value of farm pro-
ducts, which in 1919 was aproximate- i
ly the same as the value of manufac-
tured products, showed no material
change during that 10-year period.
l Furthermore, the state has continued
to grow from an industrial stand-
point from 1919 to 1926 with but little
if any change in the agricultural sit-
uation.
I "Industry is becoming ,more and
more dependent upon research for its
'continued progress and development.
Back of that research which we may
describe as creative engineering, is
that which may be described as fun-
damental. Great' need exists for ade-
quate support for scientific research
if this country is to develop indus-
trially. This is particularly true at a
time such as this when our raw ma-
terials are more and more becoming
exhausted and we need to fall back
upon scientific discoveries for our
further industrial development. In
this general connection, therefore, the
relative expenditures which are avail-
able to the various state institutions
are interesting. In the field of agricul-
tural research the state provided last
year, $375,280.02 of which amount
$372676.45 was actually expended.
This comparison is made with no
criticism whatsoever with regard to
the amount appropriated for agricul-
tural research. The contrast, however,
~cannot help but raise in one's mind
the disparity in the relative amounts
Sappropriated and raise the question as
t1o whether sufficient funds should not
be appropriated for scientific research
to enable the various state institu-.1
tions to do their part in further indus-
trial development of the state.
- "Some figures of the money spent
on research by large industrial con-
, cerns might be interesting. The pub- I
- lic at large has very little concep-
tion of the amounts spent in his field
which has become so indispensible to
all forms of industry.

AIumnII association, matte the .1!-
nouncement yesterday of the appoint-
ment of a temporary board of gover-
nors for the University of Michigan
club of Ann Arbor which will be offi-
cially installed at the meeting of the
ninth district of the Alumni associa-
tion in Ann Arbor on May 7. The act-
ing governing body for the local or-
ganization, which is in the process of
formation, was selected by President
Ottoway to take charge of the actual
formation of the club in Ann Arbor
and will remain in office until a meet-
ing of the club can be held after its
installation.
At the same meeting, in addition to
the conception of the Ann Arbor club,
a successor for Mason P. Rumney,
'07E, retiring director, will be elect(d.

A view of Weepah, Nevada, the s 'ttdlemiet that snrang out of the sagebrush
boys had uncovered a promising veia of gold and sitarted the west's latest gold
is shown in the foreground.

virtually overnight after two
rush. A jitney water tank truck

for Economical Transporation:

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In addition to these low prices
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F
;
i

FOR A REAL VACATION
min na
TRY A BIT OF-

TENNIS OR

GOLF

University Chevrolet Sales
102 S. Ashley *

A New Supply of Rackets and Golf Clubs Just Arrived.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

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--------------------
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The

Event

of

the

Theatrical

Season

The Mimes

Masques

Production of

EUGENE O'NEILL'S

A

A

CH STIE

I

(Pulitzer Prize--1920)

Mimes Theater

Week Starting Tuesday, April 19

11

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