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April 06, 1927 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-04-06

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iTHEMICHICAN DAILY WtDNfDAY,
U 1 o

EA r , 139

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Westea Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
at postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
! 4Subscription, by carrier, $3.7S; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ana .Arbor Press Building, May-
lard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; usiness 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGINGEDITOR
SMITH H. CADY. MR
Editor.. .............W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor.............-.Irwin A. Olias
News Editors.......j Frederick Shillito
E Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor....... .Marion Kubik
Sports Editor .............Wilton A. Sim pson
Telegraph Editor....'......Morris Zwerdling
Musio and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors'
Oharles Behymet Ellis Merry
N Carlton Champs, St..nfordNZ. Phelps
o Chamberlin Courtland C.,Smith
ames Herald Cassan A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger, ' Hry. Tburnau
Joseph Brunswic
Reporters

The "Council is apparently preju-
diced against any plan which would
bring a woman student to its meet-
ings. A deviation from this narrow
policy might not be such an unwise
step. At least, the Council might give
some serious attention to the pro-,
posal.
THE PUBLIC
There is a widespread and per-
nicious misconception that in the long
run the public can be depended upon
to judge rightly, use common sense,
and form a necessary check on the
more radical persons in society. Suchj
a misconception exists in spite of all
efforts to dislodge it. As a matter of'
fact, the opposite is nearer the truth.
A check of an authoritative report
recently compiled by Mrs. Christine
Frederick in the Annals of the Amer-
ican Academy of Political and Social
Science brings to light many of the
"sensible jugments" of the public, as
fairly represented in per capita fig-
ures. *
According to the report, $2.58 is
spent per capita for diamonds and but
$1.10 on books; for six cents in ink,
$1.30 goes to buy pickles; $4.15 for
near beer, compared against twenty-
two cehts for dentifrices; while $5
is spent on jewelry, only fifteen cents
goes for the completed work of art-
ists; for each $9 which is used for
cosmetics per capita eight cents goes
generously for professors' salaries.
The list not only goes to show that it
takes more than facts to dislodge ,a
misconception or half truth, but that
there is considerable room for im-
provement in the "reliable judgments"
of the public.
REFORMING CRIMINALS
Mere detention in prisons was held
to be the wrong method of reforming
criminals in a recent address by Dr.
David Clark of the psychopathic di-
vision of a Detroit hospital who pic-_
tured the criminal completing an ex-
pensive jail sentence with his defec-
tive instincts and feelings uncured.
The correct method of treatment, ac-
cording to Dr. Clark lies in "the appli-
cation of some intelligent remedy."'
Certainly, any process by which
criminals will be made into good citi-
zens, and society will be spared some
of its present prison expenses, will be
welcome. The chief difficulty in at-

OATED fOLL
{PROFESSORS
LITTLER
NOW FEEL
Two funny things happened since
our last issue. The Gridiron Banquet
told professors where to get off, and
Ann Arbor had an election.
DOWN THE DIAGONAL
"For the sake of my con-
science," remarked the Penitent
Professor late last night, "I hope
that the remarks made at the
Gridiron Banquet were a bit ex-
aggerated."
* * *
GRIDIRON KNIGHTS' BANQUET
AS TOLD BY A PROFESSOR
Editor's Note: The following ac-
count of the Gridiron Knights' Ban-
quet is the way a protessor would tell
it to his wife when he got home last
night:
* * *
Now, Emmy, really, I was not play-
ing poker at the Faculty club. I was
at the Gridiron Knights' banquet, and
here is a plant I swiped from the dec- I
orations to prove it.
' - * * *
No, dear, I can't tell you anything
about the affair. I am under oath not
to disclose anything' that happened
there. But I can tell you a few ,of
the general things.
* * *
In the first place we had to stoop
to get into the dining room. Anyone
stoops pretty lo f who will eat a meal
at the Union, anyway.
* * *
The door to the dining room was
framed in flame. But it wasn't any
where near as hot as my collar after
they started talking about -me.
* * *
The place looked like a Senior
Girls' dinner inside. Some florist
must have thought they were going to
bury the professors.
* * *
Roastmas'ter Abbot got even for his
political defeat of yesterday when lie
started his introductions. A good
many of the faculty would never vote
for him in any future election.

Mi'sic and Drama'

THIS AFTERNOON: Earl Moore's
class in Choral Literature will pre-
sent Haydn's "The Creation" at'4:15
o'clock in Hill auditorium.
ONIGHT: The Varsity Band con-
cet, at 8 o'clock in Hill auditorium.
* * .
THE BAND CONCERT
The last Ann Arbor appearance of
the Varsity Band before leaving for a
spring tour of giorthern Michigan,
where they will inflict a-series of con-
certs on the natives, will take place
tonight in Hill auditorium. It has
been announced as an Easter pro-
gram, although this seems to be a
misnomer as most of the numbers, I
with the exception of the "Victors"
and "The Yellow and Blue" seem to
be from the 1912 edition of the Salva-
tion Army hymn book. However, they
are sufficiently well-known to make
the crusade for culture in the prov-
inces an immense success.
* * *
"THE CREATION"
Probably the most popular of all
choral works are Mendelssohn's
"Elijah", Handel's "The Messiah" and
Haydn's "The Creation." During the
present year, Earl Moore's students
in Choral Literature have done the
above, together with the Bach B minor
Mass (which will NOT be given!)
"The Hymn of Praise" by Men-
delssohn, and other choral composi-
tions= of' greater and lesser import. Of
this group "The Creation" has been
chosen for a public performance this
afternoon, to take the place of the
regnlar Twilight'Organ Recital. I\Irs.
FrederOcJ Hull, soprano, will be the
guest artist, with the following stu-
dents of the class assisting as solo-
ists:
,Marjrie Chavanelle, Thelma Bolin,
and Ele i' Peelle, sopranos.
lPe s ie Sickles, contralto.
Ottis Patton and Royden Sussu-

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21211
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Contracts .................William C. Pusch
Copywriting..........Thomas E. Sunderland
"tocal Advertising ....George 1-. Annable, Jr.
Foreign Advertising.......Lautence Van tuyl
Circulation .............T..KennethBI aven'
Publication.........John 11. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
Beatrice Greenberg George Ahn, Jr.
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Yaa . Ta~i{{

WEDN DAY, APRIL 6, 1927
Night Editor-S NFORD N. PHELPSj
FRAME' REFUSES
Stating objections made against the
first naval disarmament' proposal by
President , ooldige, France has turn-
down the second American invitation
to be represented "in some fashion"!
at the three power conference sched-!
uled between England, Jatan, and the
United States.
While the replyt is disappointing tol
those who hoped for an effective re-
duction of naval armament, it is not
at all surprising. As before, France
has adhered the theory that efforts
of the League of Nations toward
world disarmament should be sup-j
ported exclusively, and that all phases
of world disarmament should> be con-j
sidered together in the presence of all
nations. Doubtless, France has as
much right to these ideas as this coun-
try has to refrain from official parti-
bipation in the League activities. Her
refusal is nevertheless unfortunate,
since effective naval reduction, par-
ticularly by England, is closely bound,
up with a consideration of the French
subamrine strength.
The three powers concerned will, of
course, meet as they have planned.
While the adoption of a comprehen-
sive disarmament scheme may be im-
possible, they should be Obl to reach
an undeirstanding which 'will b val-I
uable intrinsically and as a founda-
tion for a wider agreement in the
future.
DESIRABLE ACTION
Some time ago a suggestion, as the
result of agitation which has been
more or less evident the past tw
years, was made to the Student Coun-
cil to the effect that women students
be given some representation in that
organizat on. h the Council has con-
sidered the matter, let alone take any
definite action one ,vay or the other,
it has remained conspicuously mute
on the subject.
The suggestpim was made that the
president of the Women's League be
made an ex-officio member of the!
Council corresponding to the same
office of the Vrnion. -This would at
least justify -th& title "Student" Coun-
cil more than at present. Again, the
woman representative could serve on,
certain committees during the year
more advantageously than men. Fin-
ally, women students as a whole
would be aiven official voice and vote

taining this
would seem

desired state of affairs
to be that involved in

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATH S
ON THE
CAMPUS

fnr i c i ' o 4iinlm n

" aly

forming the intelligent remedy.
Though some treatments already pro-
posed might suffice for certain types
of criminals, far more extensive andj
effective methods must precede any
replacement of the general prison
system.
The old time campus student who
used to announce his candidacy for a
campus job seems to have given way
to the doorbell ringer and lapel pul-
Ier.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
caits will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.I
GULLIBLE
To The Editor :.
It is quite amusing, to me to ob-
serve the frequent eveidences of self-
righteous delight in which certain'
dramatic and other critics in The
Daily hurl that word "gullible" 'at
every audience that really limbers up,
forgets to remain cold and stiff' in
frozen pretense of super-intellectual-
ism, and shows genuine enjoyment in
something or another in one of the
theaters or elsewhere.
Is it part of Michigan's educa-
tional policy to develop a set of ego-
tistical, snobbish highbrows? If not,
why cannot one of her students or
patrons laugh with Lauder, burst out
with impulsive applause at the first
note of Kreisler's Liebesfreud, go
occasionally to the "free lectures in
Natural Science auditorium" or, if
you will, read certain articles in the
American Magazine with something of
enjoyment?
I suppose that none of Michigan's
"dramatic critics" attend the movies
in Ann Arbor. Why do not these
critics who show symptoms so fre-
quently of provinciality-complexes in
their concern about our entertain-
ment, protest at the cheapness and
utter triviality of most of the movies
that come to this place where Educa-
tion and Commerce are supposed to
meet? Most every entertainment that
comes .along is torn to fragments by
these critics who love the word "gul-
lible," yet no one hears or reads a
protest against the type of movies we
have to put up with in Ann Arbor,
that is, if we are too highbrow to .go
to any of the "free lectures" or other
affairs that are more or less worth
while.
One reads (with more or less gul-
libility) in a movie advertisement in

Of course they couldn't find any-
thing wrong with my reputation, but
I was too important to miss, so they
told a couple of jokes on me. They
were so utterly far-fetched that they
were funny.
They had swell cigars, better than
the students had out just before mark-
ing time-in fact they were two-for-a-
quarter Wel}sters. Also cigarettes for
the old professors. I smoked a cigar,
of course.
. * * *
I .realy was quite nervous when
they came to the place where Pres-
ident Little was to give out the Oil
Can. But he didn't call on me. He
gave it to Frayer. I always did think
these History professors were pop-
ular because they' find a lot of jokes
in their historic, studies and repeat
them as their own.
* * *
I i
''"
A LITTLE PICTUrRE
OF A BIG EVEN'T
* * *
GIANT PROTEST TO BE MADE
OF ANN /ARBOR'S POLITICS
As a result of thekgraft in Monday's
election, students are forming an as-
sociation that will agitate toward the
removal of the University from Ann
Arbor.
* * *
We are backing the movement, be-
cause we have evidence that the whole
election was crooked. We paid sev-
eral people to vote for us, and they
got into the polls and voted, although
they weren't electors, and e then the
city didn't credit us with a single
vote.
* * *
a ROLLS CANDIDATE SPEAKS
Deare Haye-
| I am just a simple candidate of the
people. Therefore I think there is
still some room for honesty in
politics. -
If elected I shall revamp the sys-
tem of selling candy in U. Hall and
have nrettier and nicer clerks-even

been suggested that this column take
sone stand in the war upon nudity
and the profaner vulgarities of the
stage. This was all brought to a
head a little over a month ago with
the rai' of "TheCaptive", "Sex"' and
"The Virgin Man." Except for the'
titles of the last two there seemed to
be nothing worse in these than in a
dozen other current and so-called sex
plays. The first is Edward Bourdet's
drama'of a woman who falls victim to
the fascination of a pervert of her
own sex. "Sex" was a cheap' melo-
drama of a Montreal prostitute who
wreaked summary vengeance on a New
York society woman who had wrong-
ed her; it was about to complete a
year's run. "The Virgin man" was
the story of -an unkissed gent from
Yale and his adventures with three
brazen hussy of the furnished apart-
ment variety. It was about to close
for natural reasons, when the ensu-
ing publicity pushed it into the ranks
of the season's successes.
So much for the history of the sit-
uation-now the solution. After a
month's argument with suggestions
coming all the way from Burns Man-
tle to Texas Gunian, Frank Craven
seems to have reached the most log-
ical con clusion in the matter; and
being an actor-author-producer, he
should know. Now his idea is so sim-
ple: have a dirty plane zone and a
clean play zone, and the public can
judge for itself. Of course it's un-
fair to the clean plays masquerading
under dirty advertisement '(for in-
stance "New York Exchange," al-
though not so clean, being called "'a
male ,Captive") but anyway children
will know where to take their parents
without resorting to the unsafe cate-
gories of Robert Benchley and George
Jean Nathan!
* *s*s
"JOSE"
A review, by Robert Silbar.
Although it is not the custom' for
this column to review moving pic-
tures, yet when something as original
as "Jose" comes, some comments are
needed. The film was long and drag-
ged a little but it was realistic. And
when the captions are in Spanish and
your neighbor endeavors to translate
in your ear you realize that you are
seeing something different. The scene
of the story is laid in northern Spain.
All the characters are Spanish. -Jose
is a captain of a crew of fishermen.
He is in love with Elisa, but unfor-
tunately their marriage is opposed by
the mothers of both lovers. How the
two are helped by Don Fernando
Meira. a noverty stricken feudal lord,

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MAY

FEISTIVAL

What They Say.
THE. DENVER COLLEGE OF MUSIC, 4NC.

DENVER, COLORADO
February 17; 1927.
Charles A. Sink, Esq.,
University School of Music.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
My Dear Mr. Sink:
Have just read the announcement of your coming May Festival and
I hasten to congratulate you upon the excellent program, artists and con-
ductors. You have some of the outstanding artists of the field and in
Earl V. Moore and Frederick Stock, conductors for whom I have the
greatest respect and admiration-knowing them and their work personally.
I do not know Joseph E. Maddy.
I do not see how in the world you can put out such a program as
indicated for the prices you intend to charge.
The' May Festival of Ann Arbor is one of the best in the country,
ranking with Worchester, Cincinnati and Evanston. My heartiest con-
gratulations and best wishes fo{ your splendid efforts.
Sincerely yours,

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