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April 05, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-04-05

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ESTABLISHED
1890

it q4an

~ aiI

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 136

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR: MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE GENTS

__..

- PRICE. FIVECENT

UNOFFICIAL RETURNS IN CITY ELECTION
SHOW STA[BLER WINNER OVER CAMPBELL;
BURSLEY ELECTEDSIXTH WARD ALDERMAN

1)EMHOCRATIOC(_ANDIDATE POLLS
HEAVIEST VOTE IN
SECOND WARD
LOSES IN TWO WARDS
ampbell Shows Substantial Lead In
Sixth And Seventh Wards,
Returns Show
BU;LLETIN
(fly Asnociated Press)
Detroit, April '-Unofficial re-
turns early this morning from
state elections follow:
Regents of the University: Han-
ehett, Rep., 18,384; Hubbard,
Rep., 18,406; Boltwood, Dem.,
5,727; Douglas, Dem., 5,844.
Superintendent Public instruc-
tion: Pierce, Rep., 18,831; Pitt-
man, Dem., 6,004.
State Board of Education:
Jeffers, Rep,, 18,742; Young, Dem.,
3,848.
Edward Staebler, Democrat, was
elected mayor of Ann Arbor to suc-
ceed Robert A Campbell, Republican,
and treasurer of the University, un-
official. returns from all wards early
this norning showed. Staebler polled
234 votes more than Campbell, the
standing for all the wards of the city
being: Staebler 2262 and Campbell
2028.
Unofficial returns also showed that
Dean Joseph A. fBursley had defeated!
Waldo Abbot, of the Rhetoric depart-
ment, for the position of alderman
from Sixth ward. The vote was:
Bursley 324, Abbot 167. Returns were
not obtainable on other officers.
The vote by wards in the mayoralty
race ,follows:
First Ward
Campbell ...................... 214
Staebler.......................264
Second Ward
Campbell... ..................272
Staebler ..... ...............577
Third Wardf

Wins Over Abbot In
Sixth Ward Contest]

FILMEVERSION OF'
NOVEL .BY VALDES
TO BE PRESENTED
is in Spanish. The Romance language
f -
Odeartent"an Lae Socidad Epno
ahe" hefrinthmae peewtation wi
i the firstnv ofitskid to The present
Treseneothe3o'lotorigaidin!
fishaingovige.nnThernmspain. relsI
t sin theafishngThonTeSpanshac-
tor, Jivier Rivera, takes the title role,
while Elisa, the heroine, is played by
Enriqueta Soler. The entire company,
is made up of Spanish actors fromj
the Cartago Film company of Madrid."
ON ANIMAL_*BREE[DING~
German Scientist Is Visiting America
To Consult Authorities In
Heredity Field
PLANS RESEARCH WORK
Hans Nachtsheim, one of Germany's
leading geneticists, will give a Uni-
versity lecture on "The Relation of
Genetics to Animal Breeding" at 4:15
today in Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Nachtsheim came to y
America through the Rockefeller
Foundation in order to consult with
American authorities in the field of
heredity. He is here as a member of,
the managing board of the Interna-
tional Congress of Genetics, to beI
held next September in Berlin, and}
is in charge of the program of Amer-
ican contributions.f
At present, Professor NachtsheimI
is research fellow under the Interna-i
tional Education board, and will de-l
vote most of his time to carrying on;
research in genetics and heredity with"
Professor Thomas Hunt Morgan and
his co-workers at Columbia Univer-
sity.
Professor Nachtsheim is not only a
leading scientist and authority in his
field, but he is also quite prominent
in the matter -of scientific literature.
He Is managing editor of the leading
European journal of genetics, and has
an international reputa;tion as thet
publisher of a number of scientific
papery%. He speaks English fluently.
One of the literary works for which!
he is most noted is the translationj
into German of "The Mechanism oft
Mendelian Heredity," by Morgan,
Sturtevant, Muller, and Bridges.

1NVITATION TO SHARE1
IN ARMS CONFERENCE
DECLINED BY FRANCE
COOMIIWES SECOND PROPOSAL
IEFUSED) BECAUSE OF
PREVIOUS PLANS
MEMORANDUM IS SENT
Cannot Consider Linitation Of Naval
Armaments Apart From Land And
Aerial Preparations,
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, April 4.-The French gov-
ernment today declined the American
invitation to be represented "in some1
fashion" at the three-power confer-
ence for the reduction of naval arma-
ments which is to meet at Geneva
with the United States, Great Britain
and Japan participating.
President Cool-
idge's second dis-
armament over-!
ture was turned
down for the
same reason giv-
en for rejecting,
the first one; the
fact that France
already is engag-
ed in armament
limitation discus-
sion under the
auspices of the
P2E5 CQ0.06a League of Na-,
tions. It also is
stated that from France's viewpoint,I
limitation of naval armaments cannot
be considered apart from land andI
aerial fighting force. A memorandum
containing the French refusal has
been turned over to the United States
embassy by the French foreign office.
It asserts that France cannot weaken
the authority of the League, which al-
ready has taken up the problem of
general disarmament, nor can France
compromise the principle of equality
of all nations, large or small.
"Despite the assurance which the j
Amnerican government has given con-
cerning the preoccupations which in-
spired its initative and the principles
which guided it," says the note, "the
government of the republic is unable
to modify its views on the proposition
of which it already has taken hold. ItI
continues to feel itself unable to con-
sider a positive participation ofj
France at the projected cor'ference of'
the United States, Great Britain and'
Japan."
The memorandum continues that

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Dr. 'James K. Pollock of the po-
litical science department has been
awarded a fellowship for travel and°
study abroad by the Social Science'f
Research council, Dean John R.
Effinger, of the literary college, an-
nounced yesterday. Dr. Pollock will
make a special study of the financing
of political parties in England, France
and Germany.
Dr. Pollock is an expert on the sub-
ject of party finance and is the author
of a book on financing parties in the
United States. Dr. Pollock is a grad-
uate of the University. He received
his Ph.D. at Harvard and later served
as an instructor at Ohio State uni-
versity. He has been on the Univer-
sity faculty for about three years.
AMERICA TO DEMAND~
NANKING REPARATIONS
Darkening Outlook For Future Safetyk
Of Americans In Northern China.
Overshadows Consideratiion
NO ULTIMATUM ISSUED
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, April 4.-Final a -
tion by the American government to.
demand reparation from the National-'
ist government for the Nanking out-
rages, it was indicated today, was
close at hand, but for the moment the
steadily darkening outlook for the

RESEARCH GROUP
HONORS POLLOCK
WITH FELLOWSHIPI

DIGNITY WILL FALL BEFORE FUSILL OIJNN
MEET FOR 'RAZZ fEST' TONIGHT AT UNION

President To Pass
On Oil Can Tonight

FA(TLTY, STU'DENTS, (GIESTS TO
31 EFT ON EQU'AL P'LAN\E
AT A1NNUAL BAINQU:ET
REED MAY FILIBUSTER
Precautions Taken To Enforce Rules
On Length And Humor of Speeches;
Gong Will Ie Used

h
d.

F

Campbell..............
Staebler..... .............
Fourth Ward
Campbell . ,.-..........
Staebler................
Fiffth Ward

208
312
202
.303

Campbell .. . . ...............76
Staebler .... .............83
8"1 . Ward

Dean Joseph A. Bimrley I
SELINCOURHT LECTURES
ON SOURCEOF1 GENIUS
Speaker Traces Art Of Bronte Sisters
To Their Revelation Of- World's
Mysterious Beauty
DESCRIBES ENVIRONMENT
"The Genius of the, Brontes" ac-
cording to Ernest de Selincourt, pro-
fessor of English language and litera-
ture at the University of Birmingham,
who spoke, yesterday in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium ,lies in their rich
revelation of the mysterious beauty
and magnificence of the world about
them to 'man. Although the stigma of
mid-victorianism has caused a wan-
ing in'the popularity of the works,
of the Bronte sisters in the last 251
years, Professor de Selincourt findsI
rare genius in theirrnovels.
"Raised in a literary atmosphere,"
and apart from the rest of the world,
the Bronte sisters: Charlotte, Emily
and Anne, early inherited a passion
for liberty. Such scorn of injustice,
contempt for conventions of society
and passion for freedom has not been
found in literature since the time of
Shelley and Byron," stated Professor
de Selincourt. "The outstanding point
of their genius is the intensity with
which they reveal inner experience."'
Charlotte Bronte in particular, was
one of the greatest painters of humanj
nature that the realm of novelists has
known. Her daily life was character-
ized by a repressed nautre; it was
through her art that she found ade-
quate expression of the exultation in
nature that she experienced. This
characteristic was common of the sis-
ters. and the characters of their
novels inevitably turn to nature for
solace in -time Of sorrow. They be-
lieved nature sympathetic, and be..j
lieved in submission to the natural
world about them. Books and society
were nothing to them compared to
nature.
Ludicrous passages in their works,
and a lack of an artistic touch is over-
come, Professor de Selincourt be-
lieves, in their vivid imagination, and
the communication of nature and man
which it produces. They would sub-
stitute the laws of divine and natural
instinct for the laws of society, and

" Campbell................
Staebler ....................
Seventh Ward
First Precinct:
Campbell .................... .
Staebler ......................
Second Precinct:
Campbell.................. .
Staebler ....................

Dignity and decorum are scheduled
ito be left aside at the fifth annual
Gridiron Knights' banquet to take
place in the Union tonight, when lo-
cal, state, and national B. M. 0. C.'s
will meet for the traditional "razz-
fest", at which University institutions
and men will meet fusillades of satire.
With Sen. James A. Reed of Mis-
souri heading the list of speakers,
and Waldo Abbot of the rhetoric de-
partment in the role of toastmaster,
the "Little" program of the affair
will start immediately when the
guests sit clown to dinner. The ban-
quet, sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi,
professional journalistic fraternity, is
the one event of the year in which
faculty, students, and out of town
guests, gather for an evening of satire
rnd razzing in which the most digni-
i fled will be the targets of humor.
President Clarence Cook Little The doors of the assembly hall will
be opened at 6:30 o'clock and the
doors will be closed at 7 o'clocl sharp
PROGRAM FOR EASTER and no late comers will be admitted.
Speculation as to the recipient of
DBthe oil can will be set at rest~tonight
in the final event of the banquet when
President Clarence Cook Little, hold-
er of the "trophy" for the past year
ZVirsity usicia)s Will Present inaiwill pass on the "award" to his suc-
Indoor Concert Tomorrow sNilit lcessor. The "award" is made each
Indoo Cncert AT oro year to a prominent faculty member
lin HllAuditorium f "distinguished for his verbosity."
Three former holders of the oil can
WILL VISIT SIX CITIES will attend the affair tonight; Prof.
Thomas. H. Reed of the political sci-
Presenting their annual Easter pro- ence department, Prof. 0. J. Campbell
gram, the Varsity band will give the' of the English department, and Pres-
ident Little.

:

safety of Americans in non-Nationalist
northern China appeared to be' over-
shadowing official contemplation of
the problem.
Minister MacMurray in Peking is
believed to be considering the stipu-
lations covering reparation demands
to be laid before the Cantonese au- i
thorities. The demands are expected
to be generally similar to those formu-
lated by the London and Tokio gov-
ernments but not to include aiy,
threat in the form of an ultimatum.

338
1.65
286
234
432
324

LINES OF BATTLE
MORE DEFINITE IN
STRIKE DEADLOCK
(By Associated Press)
CHIGAGO, April 4.-Battle lines
became more definite as the bitumin-
ous coal wage deadlock entered upon
its first full week today.
Rumors of impending negotiations
in the central competitive field, where
200,000 men left their jobs last Thurs-
day midnight because of failure toI
negotiate !a contract with operators,
disappeared before rejected invita-
tions to conferences and delayed over-
tures. But in Indiana, strip mine
operators, with an annual tonnage of
2,000,000, will meet with union offi-
cials at Terre Haute Friday to discuss
tentative continuation of the Jackson-
ville scale.-

COMMERCE CL UB +since the receipt of the American
ClLUB invitation, a new element has entered
TO HEAR LITTLE into the question; the preparatory dis-
armament commission of the League
President Clarence Cook Little will of Nations has begun its sitting at
be the speaker at a dinner to be given Geneva, and there the French have
by the Chamber of Commerce at 12:15 expounded their view that disarma-
o'clock today in the Chamber of Com- ment is a world wide consideration,
merce building in celebration of "Uni- not one which can be limited to a few
versity Day" which is sponsored by powers.
that organization. Invitations have The note concludes: "For us it is
been extended to all t.he deans of the I a question of property toward the
various colleges of the University. League of Nations. Considering the
T'he purpose of University Day is! spirits in which the delegations have
to keep the members of the Chamber favorably received our proposals we
of Commerce in touch with various cannot let any doubt arise as to the
matters of importance and interest in sincerity of our efforts."
connection with the University, and to -
give local business men an opportun- Washington, April 4.-Disappoint-
ity to become more intimately ac- ment, but no great surprise marked
quainted with those in the field of the reception in Washington of news
education. Chamber of Commerce of- reports from Paris that France had
ficials state that any members 0ef the declined flatly to be represented in any
faculty interested in University Day way at the three-power naval limita-
are welcome to attend the dinner. tion conference in Geneva ,next June.
# State department officials would not
IAPIRO'S ACTIONS' comment on the report or admit that
RE VEALED IN SUIT the French communication had been
received.
In view of the French attitude in
y adeclining the original five-power invi-
DETROIT, April 4.-King Cotton ' tation extended by President Cool-
and Aaron Sapiro's effort to organize exnddb PrsetCol
the southern a trs ooperae idge, however, adherence of the Paris
th otenplanters cooperatively' government to its theory that France
Iwith occasional side trips to cover goenett1t ter htFac
must support exclusively the efforts
his activities in New Jersey, Oregon, o
and New York were centered uponI of the League of Nations towards a
andyn New York wereaceytere $u, - more general treatment of the arms
today in the Chicago lawyer's $1,000,- Ili mitation question was foreseen.
000 libel suit against Henry Ford.Itain hest bywsffcesere
Many pieces of documentary evi-nIt has been hoped by officials here,
dence, letters, telegrams, contracts nevertheless, that French unofficial
drawn up by Sapiro for cooperative observers v e desin
associations and a speech he made anvatch te three-bower proceedings
seven years ago went into the record and it is difficult for the Washington
today, slowing up the proceedings and governmen to utand how tha
formofpriiaincudhvco-
s contributing to a generally lack-Ilust re j o atcpto ol aecm
tg dyykplicated in any way the French posi-
day. !+.,

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Gravity of the Chinese situation was second and final indoor concert of the Speakers include many prominent
again reflected today in the close year tomorrow night in Hill auditor- faculty, two prominent students, sev-
watch which President Coolidge is ium, a traditional event which is free eral State men, and one possible pres-
keeping on official reports. He con- j to the student body andl the publ ential candidate, Senator Reed. All
ferred at the White House during the T nbmthe speeches will have in their titles
day with Nelson P. Johnson, of the he concert will be much the sa the word "Little" or "little". Most
state department, and later conferred as the programs to be given in six of the speeches will be five minutes
with Secretary Kellogg. cities of the Upper Peninsula during in length and a gong will be sounded
The state department's silence pre- the concert tour which starts April when the speakers forget their time
eluded any authoritative outline of the 110. limit or that the talks are to be
ademands for reparation to be present, umros
ed or even an official indicationt' Opening with the "Victors", the I Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the history
whether it will be handed to the Can- I Varsity band will present a program department will speak on "Little Do
tonese authorities. It was said that of 10 selections, including cornet We Know." Prof. Thomas H. Reed
official reports are confirmatory of solos, vocal solos and selections b'y of the political science department
news despatches portraying the in- the trombone quartet. Lavalee's "The will talk under the topic "Little As I
creasing menace to foreign lives in Bridal Rose Overture" will be follow- Am Accustomed to Public Speaking."
North China as Cantonese for ces press ed by 'a cornet solo by Marshall Byrn, "The Little Theater Movement", will
forward above Shanghai. Grad., who will play. "My Regards." be outlined by Gerald Hoag, manager
fokadoeSngin.hethrarVocal solos will be given by B. Lor- of the Majestic theater, followed by
Peking and Tientsln where there are ain Norton, S. of M., who will sing "Little Cuts" by Dean fIugh Cabot of
jectives both of the military advance "Trade Winds, " "Ship Mates O'Mine," the Medical school. "From Little To
and of the agitators sent forward to and "Hear Me Ye Winds and Waves". Less" is the title of the speech of
He will be accompanied on the piano President E. J. " Ottoway of , the
fanning anti-foreign sentiment among by Roland Nissle, '29D. Alumni association. "Little Bolts and
the congested native population. Only Walter C. Welke, S. of M., head of Nuts" is the topic of Prof. A. D. Moore
the continued control by Northerny the trombone section, has aranged of the electrical engineering depart-
thecninueyco ndtrolprbyeNtsrthena number which will be given by the ment. Prof. 0. J. Campbell of the
ssmilitary commanders prevents the trombone quartet. This will precede English department will giTe a dis-
pofsuhicidofetsrasnthainathN ortng.the "Lustpiel Overture" by Keler-Bela, sertation on "Little Families." A
of such incidents as that at Nanking. and the band will conclude with the number of men will also be called on
pen in North China were manifest at "Yellow and Blue." extemporaneously, according to Waldo
the embassies here of the powers .Following spring vacation, the band Abbot, toastmaster.
theembysireste.Afthe poersm will give campus concerts every Wed- The "Buccaneers," a seven piece
chiefly interested. At thesametime, nesday night. orchestra now playing at Joe Park-
however, inquiries in these diplomatic ____________f er's cafe, will furnish music during
circles served to disclose considerable ; the dinner proper and between radio
divergence of opinion as to how the HOBBS TO RELA TE broadcasting from station S-r-L. A
delicate problem of. safeguarding for- DETAILS OF FIRST ogram wi acual b broadcast
eign nationals and property in .China OF ! during the meal and the regular
could be handled. Meanwhile, this GREENLAND T R I P speches (J the program may be amp-
government maintains absolute silence --- lified by apparatus. Wilton Simpson,
as to its exchanges with foreign capi- In an illustrated University lecture '27, general chairman, said yesterday
tals in connection with the Nanking given under the auspices of the that if any spe2Ther gets monotonous,
outrages. geology department, Prof. William H. though he felt pure it wouldn't hap-
- - Hobbs will speak at S o'clock tomor- pen, it would be the easiest thing. in
LONDON, April 4.-Without waiting row night in Natural Science audi- the world to shut off the amplifying
for the other powers to decide wheth- torium on the first Greenland expedi- apparatus and thereby shut up the
er to make joint demands on the tion of the University. The lecture speaker. In the "radio hour," a suit-
Chinese Nationalists for the Nanking will be supplemented with both col- able and typical program has been
affairs, the British cabinet today re- ored slides and moving picturcl; made of news flashes, bedtime stories,
affirmed its decision to carry out a which were taken by members of the political discussions, health exercises,
strong policy, single-handed if neces- expedition during their three month and household hints and recipes.
sary, in obtaining full satisfaction. I period of meteorological research These will be inflicted upon the audi-
near Holstenborg, Greenland, last ence at various times during the din-
summer.I ner.
DEAN ANNOUNCES During the past few mon3hs, Pro- One of the events of significance on
NEWP COMMVIT TEE fessor Hobbs has spoken before a the banquet program will be the read-
. __number of societies in the east on the ing of the "Favorable Epitaph."
Dean John R. Effinger of the liter- same subject. He returned yesterday the banquet.
ary college, yesterday announced the from Washington where he addressed guests will be required to pledge
appointment of a committee whose the American Philosophical society. themselves not, to publish or repeat
function will be to fix programs for During his trip east h? made prelimin- anything said during the course of
nliterary students who expect to qual ary arrangements in New York city the evening's program and nothing
ify for teacher's certificates granted for the transportation of the second slanderous or libelous will go beyond
University expedition to Greeland in the banquet itself. The traditional af-
by the State Board of Education. June. fair is designed to place faculty and.
The members of the faculty appoint-, Ju.students on the same plane, with the
ed follow: Prof. J. W. Bradshaw, of
the mathematics department, chair- PLA YERSSELECTED d intiated
.ECTEDwill be used against either.
man; Profs. C. C. Fries, of the Eng- It was explained yesterday by Wil-
lish department, W. L. Carr, of the (By Associated Press) c,,,, - ' an"1 -

Refusal of Ohio miners to meet with accepted customs.
operators Thursday and the hopeful -
Kleclaration of Gov. John Hammill of FRESHMAN NAMED
Iowa that he expected "to make some A
headway in six days," were develop- AS SPEAKER FOR
Tents of the day. Th' Iowa governor ORA TORICAL TEST
has asserted that he would ask both
sides to meet with the state industrial
and agricultural commission to dis- Charles P. Moyer, '30, will represent
cuss differences. Illinoissoperators arc Michigan in the Intercollegiate Con-
meeting in St. Louis Friday but the stitutional oratorical contests through
probability ot a wage conferencetis his victory in a preliminary contest
remote, officials said. held yesterday in room 3209 of An-!
gell hall. Moyer won from a field of
iITTSPURGH, April 4.-Picketing 10 contestants on his oration, "Mar-
activities of the United Mine Work- shall and the Constitution."
ers were restricted by authorities to- Moyer will be the first freshman
lay as a precautionary move to pre- in the history of the University tol
vent trouble in the opposing groups represent Michigan in an intercolle-
in the Pittsburgh mine conflict. giate oratorical contest.
The order of Sheriff Robert H. Prof. Louis M. Eich, who is in
Braun, of Allegheny county, instruct- charge of the contest and who will
iug peace officers to limit union pick- coach the winner, has not yet receiv-
et s to eight men "at places where ,1ed word where the district intercol-;
there is danger of riot" brought an legiate will be held. The final na-
immediate protest from union leaders tional contest will be held in Los An-
who informed the sheriff there was no geles on June 23 where the finalists
occasion for such an order. from the districts will compete. Only

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DEBATE TONIGHT,
That the Student Christian Associa-
tion no longer serves any useful pur-
pose and should be dissolved, will be
the substance of the bill to 'be dis-
cussed at the meeting of the Adelphi
House of Representatives at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the Adelphi rooms
on the fourth floor of Angell hall.

tion in the more general discussion.
LEAGUE STUDIES
COAL SITUATION,
The various aspects of the present
coal situation was the subject of a
discussion h'eld by the League for In-
dustrial Democracy at the meeting
last night. George Bigge of the econc-
mics department led the discussion,

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