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April 01, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-04-01

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t

4

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Wester& Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated~ Press is exclusively en-
titled to the useie' republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this papwr and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the, postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
Offices: Ann. Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Fditorial, 4925; Business 2124.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY. JR. -
Editor......... ....W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor... ...IinAOia
News Editors.... .. Frederik Shilito
iPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editors..........Marion Kubik
Spots Edtor...., p Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor;.. ...Morris Zwerdl'ing
Kuni and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Ck aries Behyme Elis Mery
alton Champ┬░┬░ St.nfrd N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
ames Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau,
Joeph Brunswick
Reporters
Marion Anderson. Milton Kirshbaum
Margaret ArthtWr Pal Kern
Jean Campbell Sally Knox
Jessie Church Richard Kurvink.
Chester E. Clark G. Thomas MKean
> Edward C. Cummings Kenneth Patrick
Margaret Clarkt Mary Ptoly
Blanchard Wi leland Morris (Qum"
Clarence Edelso4; ames Sheehan
William Emer# 1 , ylvia Stone
Robert E. FinA Mary Louise Taylor
J. Martin Frssel Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Robert Gessner William Thurnau
Margaret Gross MarianmWelles
Elaine Gruber Thaddeus Wasielewski
Coleman J. Glencer Sherwood Winslow
Harvy Gunderson Herbert E. Vedder
Stewart Hooker Milford Vanik
Morton B. Icove-
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS }MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Contracts ..... ............. William C. Pusch
Copywriting.........Thomnas E Sunderland
Local Advertising .G...Gorge H. Annable, Jr.
Foreign Advertising ......Laurence Van Tuy
Circulation................. Kenneth Haven
Publication................John 11. Bobrink
Accounts ............Francis A. Norquist
- 'Assistants
Beatrice Greenberg George Ain, Jr.
Sema Jensen Florence Coopr
Marion L. Reeding A. M. Hinkley
Marion Kerr E. L. Hulse
'Nance Solomon R. A. Meyer
Ralph L. MilleT harvey Talcott
John Russwinkle Harold Utley
Douglas }.uller Ray Wachter
Virle-C. Witham Esther Booze
. t .-1t3
FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1927
Night Editor-JO H. CHAMBERLIN
IN MEMORIUIMI-
Eleven years ago today ended the
career of James Burril Angell, former
President of the University, after 38
years of untiring service for the ad-
vancement of this institution. Serving
as President 'of the University for
thirty-eight years, it was largely
through hi ladership that it develop-
ed from comparative obscurity to a
position aiong the foremost institu-
tions of learninig in the world.'Honors
without nupmber are merited by the
man to wh6P the University is so tre-
medously indebted-'
RIDICULOUS EXAMINATIONS
It is one' Of' the ridiculous if not
absurd requiremleuts of the literary
college that written final examinations
are required in all courses given,
whether elementary, intermediate, or
advanced. The value of examinations
in certain courses given in the liter-

ary college is admitted by most every-
one ,but in the advanced seminar{
courses the tequirement, is invariably
inefficient, useless, and is either
evaded or disregarded entirely as an
indication of work done. In the
seminary courses the work done byI
different students is of such a variedl
nature that no examination questions
can be evolved by a professor. which
will meet the requirements of each
student in the course .without being
so general in nature that they are
worthless as tests of knowledge or
method. ;.
Does it seem radically unreasonable
to suggest that when a student has
sufficient interest and ability in a cer-
tain field to do the difficult advanced
work that he should be relieved from
the usual pre-examination fact cram-
ming orgy? Does it seem disrespect-
ful to suggest that the varied work
done by students in the seminar
courses prevents the giving of an ex-
amination suitable to the work done
by each during the semester? Does
it appear verging upon the dictatorial
to state that giving such examinations
is useless and out of modern educa-
tionial style?
That final examinations in such ad-
vanced ccuvises should be abolished

by the inflictors and afflicted. The
requirement should be stricken from
the books, the sooner the better.
WOMEN JURORS
Those who have regarded the ad-
mission of women to jury service
'with scepticism have ben put in a
rather difficult situation by reportst
from more , than 100 judges in 201
states who attribute positive gains to
justice to the presence of women in
the jury box. More than 90 per cent1
of those who replied to the nation-i
wide questionnaire favored juries con-1
sisting of both men and women. Be-'
sides giving cases as careful consid-
eration as men, women jurors are
credited with raising the moral tone]
of the court room, and with showing
more care in carrying out the instruc-
tion of the judges.
RECOGNITON]
One of the surest signs that we canr
possibly gain of the eminence of ourf
University is the recognition it re-]
ceives from outsiders, and in view of
this fact the recent appointment of
Prof. Laurence Gould, of the geology
department to the personnel of the
Putnam expedition to the North this
summer is especially gratifying.
It is one thing to have a faculty
comopsed of narrow minded pedants
who are confined close to their own
field; it is quite another to have men
on our staff who are recognized when
leading scientists are needed and a
broad field of research is opened. The
University should be proud, both of
Professor Gould who has achieved the
honor and of the general type of
faculty men who elicit such recogni-
tion.
INTERVENING IN CHINA
England's willingness to withdraw
from China, or to maintain the pres-
ent concessions by force, imposing on
the Chinese respect for the flag, per-
sons, and property of foreign nation-
als, depending upon the attitude of
Japan and the United States has
placed a question of policy directly
before these countries.
Though the Tokio government has
not yet made its reply, it has defi-
nitely decided not to adopt coercive
measures over the Nanking affair,
which was certainly an event pro-
vocative of action if any is forth-
coming. Japanese editorial opinion-
has universally backed this govern-
, ment decision, and likewise opposes
any military operations not'necessary
for the protection of its nationals.
For the United States, there should
be no hesitation in refusing the policy
of intervention. It has no conces-
sions or spheres of influence in China,
and in accord with its previous rela-
tions with China wishes none. Mili-
tary and naval action in excess of
that needed for the protection and re-
moval of its citizens would be ex-
pensive and foolhardy. An American
official of long experience in China is
reported to have termed intervention
suicidal unless the powers are pre-
pared to bring a force of 500,000 men
to China for a probable occupation of
10 years . America, now regarded as
friendly by the Chinese, would come
to the unenvied position occupied by
the British, and would gain little
commercial or diplomatic advantage
not available by a policy of peace and
comity.
Excessive pressure by foreign pow-
ers would likely have the dangerous
effect of making China more radical.
P One of the most important aspects of
I the Chinese situation at the present
tne is the struggle between 'General

Kai-shek and the communists whom
he is trying to drive out of the Can-,
tonese party. If the powers inter-
vene, they will play directly into the
hands of the radicals who will thus.
gain additional grounds for anti-for-
eign agitation similar to that follow-1
ing the Nanking bombardment. If
there is no outside interfere ne, it is
believed that the conservative and
merchant class can soon gain control
of the party and endeavor to establish
a stable government.
As the Cantonese control is prefer-
red to a Russianized Chin'a, then, the
world powers would do well to limit
their military efforts except as they.
are needed to insure the immediate
safety of their nationals.
COLLEGE INFLUENCE
The great industries of the nation,}
recognizing that in the colleges is to i
be found the cream of the youth of1

PROFDED OLL
OASED RLL Music and Drama
AMUSE
THEM SELES L
Senator Jim Reed is coming to the TONIGHT: Harry Lauder, in a pro-
Gridiron Banquet. Remember, Jim, grai of song and comedy at 8:15
no filibustering? f't.1n fha Whitnov thp;Ai.

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FRITAY, APRTL 1. 192
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* * *
Reed will be right in his element at
this "razz fest." Being here in Mich-
igan, the center of all that is Repub-
lican and good, the Democratic Sen-
ator from Missouri will have plenty of
subject matter for his sarcasm.r
* * A
ROLLS FEARLESSLY GxOES ON
IN ITS EXPOSE OF FACULTY
Rumors that ROLLS was suppressed
yesterday because of Its expose of the
Faculty club are false. .Nothing mi-
portant interfered with pblication;
it was the Music and Drama columni
that happewred to have its whole staff
blowing off adjectives at once.
Article Two
Professors practice in the Faculty
Men's club house for the entertaip-
ment they put on in class, according
to an investigation made yesterday by
ROLLS. One night a month the club
gathers to watch one of its members
go through his tricks.
# * #
For instance at their meeting to-
night they are to have a little skit by
a prominent member of thg faculty.
Since he is an inveterate extension
division speaker, he ought to be en-
tertaining.
* * #

I, '. sf l JZit 1nV riukteU l t lte
TON IGIT : Comedy Club presents
"The Trumpet .Shall Sound", by
Thornton Wilder, at 8:30 o'clock in
the Mimes theater.
* . *

1
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DOWN THE DIAGONAL
"I'm proud to state," said the
Cynical Senior yesterday, "that
I have attended the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts
for four years without learning
anythingtabout literature, sci-
ence or the arts."

"THE TlRUMlPET SHALL SOUTND" I
A review, by Paul J. Kern.
It is three months since "the writer"
last contributed'to this column; and
that isbecause it took three months
to explain the last review. Having
become very pacific in tendency since
then, however, and likewise having
developed somewhat of a respect for
facts, I can't help but admit that the
"The Trumpet Shall Sound" by the
Comedy club is a very good show, and
that the acting therein is very good I
acting.
Making no pretensions as to my
knowledge of dramatics as an art or
science or whatever it is, the tirades
of the professional reviewers against
stage mechanics and such things (10
not annoy one in the least. If the play
is not a good one, I am sorry to mis-
lead the gentle reader, but I liked it1
anyway.
ywTo get more definite, there were
some very good pieces of acting in
the performance. Particularly note-
worthy were the interpretations of
Sarah Budie by Dorothy Williams and
Old Gaylord by Samuel Bonnell.
Thurston Thieme, playing a part for
which he is admirably adapted, was
likewise excellent, and sophomores
such as he presage well for the future
of campus dramatics.
William Bishop, playing the part of
Horace Dabney, did a very fine piece
of work. It is regrettable that after
the brilliant sophomoric debut that
this actor made last year he is not
seen in more productions now. Pau-
line Jacobs was exceptio'nally good
as Flora Storey, and Alice Vosper as
Miss DelValle, and, as a matter of
fact, one could go through the entire
cast, apply superlatives all the way,
and make no mistakes at all.
Well,' ryspace is almost up, and a
whole lot remains unsaid. It might
well be added that it was an immense
relief to me, at least, to see honest to
goodness girls playing female parts
after the rather indifferent efforts of
some of-the members of Mimes.
The funny little platform about
threefeet above the stage upon which
the play was given was rather bother-
some at times, and disappointing also,
because no one fell off. The programs
were pretty, and that is all there is
to say. To summarize: "The Trumpet
Shall Sound" is a most excellent show
all around.
- * * *
TEfEj STUDENTS' RECITAL
The pupils of Eunice Northrup, of
the voice faculty, and Edith B. Koon,
of the piano faculty of the School of
Music, will present a joint recital in
the School auditorium at 10:30 o'clock
tomorrow morning.
A1 r ,WHO ETS SLAPPED"
A review, by TVincent Wall..

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* * *1
GARG
The use of "awful nice,"
A crime, that he perpetrated,
Makes one think that the editor
Should be promptly incarcerated.
Nelly.
* * *
q(WAY'S DAILY BULLETIN
To All Students-
Good seats at football gaies guar-
anteed for next year.
} Harry Tillotson.
.Students-
Walk on the grass!
6 * * *
Why Proofreaders Go Mad
PROFESSOR hans Nachtsheim, of
the Institut fur vererbungsforschunt,
Landwirstschaftliche Hochschule, Ber-
lin, Germany, is in town according to
the D. O. B. He didn't :put all that on
the Union register.
* * S .
GUESS AT ANOTHER
1. At what date was the Honor
System introduced among the faculty?
1. )M.ilsguisted.
2. Is the campus going to the dogs
or are tle dogs going to the campus?
y 'Ababa Rococo.
3. If the governor of Michigan is
Green, the governor' of Illiois is
Small, what is the governor of New
Mexico? Wet Hay.
'4. What have the following in com-
mon: (1) Commencement; (2) Hal-
loween; (3) April 1.
* * *
Today is the first of the month
(lip amid fill out-
Dear Mr. (father's name):-
Enclosed find request for-
(salary for staying in the University
for the month of March). Please re-
mit..at your earliest convenience.
Signed-Your leach-
P.S.-Ten per cent discount for
prompt remission.
Wet Hay.
TIMOTIIY HAY ACCEDES.TO
URGINGS OF FRIENDS; WILL
ENTER THE POLITICAL RING
Only at the insistent urging of
friends, both of whom will be cam-
paign managers, have we decided to
enter campus politics. These campus
institutions pull so many funny boners
that we feel it will be an excellent

Company of International Artists
SPECIAL ORCHESTRA
Seats Now Orchestra, $.7.
Balcony-First Four Rows $2.20, Second Your RowA $1.65,
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Paints and Oils
Also Kitchen Ware, Glass, China and Dinner Ware-In fact
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4 UALITY.
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The formal explosion of the new
University theater has taken place,
with Play Production and Direction's
presentation of "le Who Gets Slap-
ped." The result is in itself eminent-
ly successful; the field is infinitely
more happy. But the achievement is
not so path breaking that there is not
opportunity for much improvement.
Although frankly amateur, the play
was probably the best that has ever
been given by the formerly much
caluminated Play Praduction classes,
and in comparison with some of their
offerings might be even considered
monumental. Moreover, several of
the cast were excellent. The role of
"He" in the hands of David Owen was
one of the best pieces of work the
season has seen. The rather back-
handed philosophy that "He" is called
iWon to spout on all occasions did not
become as top heavy as has seemed
almost traditional in the part, and at
all times the gestures of the accom-
plished actor were evident. Robert
Wetzel (graduated to Mimes' produc-
tions) returned to the scene of his
original glory with a colorless picture
of the Gentleman. It is not his best
characterization, but was well done
with th ,habitual suggestion of sup-
pressed emotion which seems to be
intrinsic. Leone Lee in the part of
Consuelo was the discovery of the
evening. As the naive and credulous
littleequestrienne of Papa Briquet's!
Circus, oshe played perfectly thel
nuances of the childish ignorance. Al-
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the nation, annually choose the new source of humor.
men in their organizations from the * * *
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graduates of higher educational in- are so .muany of th'em in need of en-
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