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March 22, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-22

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t

TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 192

__________________________________________________ U

r

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control o@f Student Publications.
Memers of Wester Confereace Editorial
AssoCieion.
The . ssociated. Press is exclusively en-
titled to he i W for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited e itthis paper and the local news pub-
lished the. ein.
Entered , at 'the. postoffie at Ann Arbon~,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription' by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
Offices Aim Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street
Phones : Ed'Iorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDI nNRIAIr STAFF
r Te phone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
w SMITH H. CADY. JR.
Editor;..... ..-._W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor..... . .. Irwin A. Olis
""JFrederick Shillito
News Editors............Philip C../Brooks
Womnen's Editor...... Marion Kubik
Sports Editor......... ...Wilton A. Simoson
Telegraph Editor..........Morris Zwerdring
Music and Drama...... .Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Iliitors
Charles Behymet. E s Merry
Carlton Champe Stlford N. Phelps
o Chamberlin Coi tland C. Smith\
ames Herald Cass A. Wilan
Assistant City itora
Carl Burger Henry Thurna
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters
MfarnnArrrln e Paly Yrn1
Margaret Arthur Sally Knox
Joa~n %.snpbeik kRtchara K s vink.
Jessie Church G. Thomas icKean
Chester C rlark Kenneth Pat ck
Margaret Clarke MarysPtolemy
Blanchard W. Cleland M~'urris tQu1ifl
Clarence Edelson James Sheehan
William 'Emerv Sylvia Stone

p

Robo E. Finch
Robert Gessner
Margaret Gross
Elaine Gruber
Coleman J Glencer
Farvey Gunderson
Stewart Hooker
Morton B. Icove
Milton Kirshbaun.

Mary Louise Taylor
William Thurnau
Mvarian Welles
Thaddeus Wasielewski
Sherwood Winslow
Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milford Vanik

their gains and in taking over the
Shanghai government, for some time,
the Southerners will probably be just
as anxious to continue their north-
ward advances as they were after the
capture of the cities further south.
Moreover, unless the Pekin troops are
organized much better than recently,
the Cantonese will very likely be suc-
cessful.
As it concerns the affairs of for-1
eigners in China, the fall of Shang-
hai is also important. The immenli-
ate problem, of course, is the protec-
tion of the nationals located in the
foreign settlements. The easy sur-
render of the city was quite fortunate
in this regard. With more than 20,-
000 troops of different world powers
present, and with a promise of co-
operation by the commanding Can-
tonese general, the situation should
be handled successfully.
PRECEDENT
Graduating classes in the future
will do well to regard as a precedent
the recent action of the senior literary
class in making several class offices
appointive by the advisory committee
instead of the customary election.
The change this year, though purely
accidental--when an election was
made impossible due to the fact that
only a few members of the class at-
tended the recent meeting, is worthy
of becoming a permanent syst'em.
The offices of alumni secretary,
historian, poet, orator, and prophet,
are of .sufficient importance in them-
selves to be removed from the possi-
b: ity of political influence. Popular-
ity ( student should not be a factor
in the selection of such officers. The
advisory committee, appointed by the
class president, is, without question,
the best qualified body to choose these
five officers.
A STRONG BID
In a desperate attempt to regain
first rank in the divorce granting
business, Nevada, and Reno in par-
ticular, has just made a strong bid
for future trade by reducing the res-
idence requirement from six to three
months. The reason. is that Mexico
and Paris have been making heavy
inroads in Reno's pet business. But
no doubt this may be attributed to the
fact that the divorce seekers tire of
Reno after the fourth or fifth trip.
It probably would be quite shocking
to some of those individuals comment-
in upuon "The Crime of Getting
Caught" if the opinion were expressed
that a crime Is a crime whether ob-
served or not.
President Coolidge's hand may get
injured from too much handshaking
but his paw never gets too tired from
from too much talking.
Now that the spring elections are
not far off, smoking establishments
are laying in extra quantities of
cigars.
What has become of the man who
pr dicted the latest spring since the
,adinistration of James K. Polk?
CAMPUS OPINION !
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants must be published with every
communication

I"

* * *

BUSINESS STAFF
Telepjone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
- PAUL W. ARNOLD
Contracts ......... ....William C. Pusch
Copywritisg..........Thomas . Sunderland
Local Advertising. .. .Ge~oge11. Annabe, Jr.
Foreign Advertising ......Laurence Van Tuyl
Circulation...............T. Kenneth Haven
Publication..............John H. Bobrink
-Acounts............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
Beatrice Greenberg George Ahn, Jr.
Selma Jensen Florence Cooper
I'larion L. Reeding A. M. Hinkley
Marion Kerr 1. L. Hulse
Nance Solomon R. A. Meyer
Ralph L. Miller I larvey Talcott
/ ohn Russwinkle Harold Utley
Douglas Fuller Ray Wachter
Virle C. Witham Esther Booze
J. Martin Frissel
Night Editor -STANFOIIV N. PHELPS
TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1927
THE HONOR SYSTEM
A few years ago the honor system
in colleges and universities was uni-
versally applauded, praised, and ad-
vocated by faculty and students alike
'as a distin4 advance i educatioial
method. 'lre adoption of the honor
system jvas reported to be the panacea
for the ills of the educational system,
a curative 'which would at once re-
store the ancient close association be-
tween faculty and student.
As a result the system was adopted
in many institutions of higher learn-
ing, under alt kinds of conditions, in
all sections. of the country, and by
homogenous and hetergoenous student
bodies. In many cases- the system
proved distinctly successful, in a few
others it was abandoned after brief
trials which were/unfair in that the
system was not modified to meet lo-
cal conditions or that deep seated
prejudices were too strong to be over-
come in the experimental period.
At the present time there is conse-
quently some. discredit cast upon the
honor system due to these several
'failures. This is unfortunate. Wher-
ever the system has been fairly put
on ial and ,where faculty and stu-
dents have co-operated to make it
work, the honor system has proved
distinctly successful, practical, and
workable, a definite improvement in
college and university administration.
More specifically, the honor system in
our own engineering college works
admirably.
Beginning with this issue The Daily
will publish' a report on the honor
system written by Prof. A. D. Moore,
of the engineering college, national
president of Tau Beta Pi. Professor
Moore's report will give an unbiased
account of the honor system as it
functions tcday in the colleges and
Universities of the country. The
Daily favor the honor system and it
is in the furtherance of the honor
system that this report of an author-
ity is published.
SHANGHAI FALLS

SPECIAL
TEST FOR
REV. JUMP
The boys in the architectural col-
lege are going to put out a year book
containing the best specimens ofI
architecture. It will not include many
University buildings.
* * *
In regard this trick of Mozumdar,
the strong man to appear at the box-
ing show, where a man jumps off a
ladder onto him as he is suspended
between two chairs: it is a rule that
no hob-nail boot wearers may apply!
for the job.

Music and Drama

THIS GRID AFFAIR - 1
Chief of Police O'Brien will attend
the Gridiron Banquet, according to
the committee. Also the theater
managers. We boys will have to gety
a table together and have a little tea
party of our own that night, if thec
Chief will leave the tear gas at home.t
w s *
COOLIDGE INVITEDt
Washington, March 21.-President,
Coolidge admitted tonight through hisI
spokesman that he had received an
invitation to the Gridiron banquet at
Ann Arbor. The spokesman said that
if Cal,wouldn't go, he would.
The local committee says they will
not acept any substitute for Coolidge.
Especially, when this spokesman will
want to talk. " We just wanted
Coolidge to decorate one of the tables
anyway," they said.
* * *
GUESS AT ANOTHER
This intelligence test was compiled
especially for Rev. Jump of the Con-
gregational church. He passed the
Free Press question 100 per cent and
so we think he ought to pass into
Rolls' class.t
* s* *
TODAY'S QUESTIONS
1. What have the following 'in'
common: (1) movies; (2) collection;
(3)Doxology?"
2. What is Spring?
3. Has the Gridiron Banquet any
connection with football?
4. On what (late was instruction
first begun in the School of Educa-
tion.
5. Is this statement right or wrong:
Gargoye is a humor magazine.
.* * *
(Note: As a special favor to Rev.
Jump we are answerjig our own
questions today i order that he mayy
chek up on his score iimmediately.)
* * *
TODAY'S ANSWERS1
1. The Congregational church.
2. Rain, snow, sleet, hail, wind,
breeze, sunshine.1
3. Yes. Football is the major sport
in college; the Gridiron banquet is
second.
4. Never.
5. Half right and half wrong. It
is a magazine, but......
* * *
WHAT CHEAP THUGS
Among the acknowledgements in
the program for the Junior Girls' Play
was this: "Flashlihts used by the
thugs from Kresge's." -
* * w
HELPING THE HANDBOOK
We see where they are getting
ready to get out next yar's Fresh-
man Handbook. Always been willing
to help along these journalistic en-
terprises, we submit herewith an art-
icle which might add to the effective-
ness of that Lighthouse on the Shoals
of the Freshman Year.
* * *
IT'S TOO BAD)
You'i'e in college now, freshmen,
and you might as well realize it. The
rest of thi book will tell you all
about the ideal college life. We'll let
you in on a few of the secrets of the
real thing.
* * *
First of all, don't sign up for the
Gargoyle or Chimes. Wait until you've
actually seen the junk they put out.
* * * -
Don't let any polilican convince you
that there are some wonderful oppor-
tunities in campus politics. There are
--great opportunities to do nothing.

', * * * i
Listen to everything your freshman
advisor tells you. It's often real
funny. And attend as many as pog-
sible of these freshman advisory
groups. Sometimes they have, good
i eats.
* * *
You're 'n college now, and you
can't help it. The best thing to do is
to grin and pay the bills.

TON611T: The Mimes present "To
the Ladies!" by George Kaufman and
Marc Connelly in their theater at 8:30
o'clock.
MI. HARRY LAUDER, COMEDIAN I
For something like the fifth con-
secutive season, Mr. Harry Lauder is
conducting a farewell tour of Amer-
ica. Mr. Lauder, probably ranking
with Elsie Janis and Will Rogers as
one of the three greatest.one-person
acts in big time variety is booked for
the Whitney theater on Friday, April
1, for an evening performance only.
Everaeager to bring cheer thee
American public, especially if there's
money in it, he is doing his usual
song and comedy business with the
wise chatter concerning his thrifty
countrymen on the side. He has just
returned from India, China, and the
Straights Settlements and is playing
the vaudeville houses of the east and
middle west. The Scotch "burr," tne
kilties and the trick cane are still his
stock and trade-just as Mr. Rogers
uses his chewing gum and larit-
and the effect is much the same: a
patter of wise-cracks and occasional
renditions of the old favorites that he
has popularized during his career.
THE YPSILANTI PLAYERS
Tie lpt production of the season!
of the Ypsilanti Players from the
week of March 21 (beginning last
night) until the week of April 4.
Tickets will be good for the same day
of the week as before.
THE N MAL CONCERT SERIES
Madame Sigrid Onegin, contralto,
will present a concert tonight in
Ypsilanti in Pease auditorium at 8
o'clock. ; ladame Onegin is ltey of
the Metropolitan Opera Company andl
is now in the more lucrative concert
field. The program includes operaticv
arias and folk sngs of Sweden, Ger-
many and France.
Madame is returned but recentl
from abroad and is singing several
programs in the west and middle
west. She will appear in Detroit in a
short time, following the most suc-
cessful activities of the Chicago (.ivic
in the field of grand opera in their re
cent performances of 'Tosca," "The
Jewels of the Madonna," "Aida" and
"The Resurrection."
A.:*A*
THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review, by Morton B. Icove.
One entered Hill auditorium Sun-
day aftenoon for the tenth concert
of the Faculty Concert Series op-
pressed by the dreariness of the day.
One left Hill auditorium, having heard
a program of Brahms and Franck at
thei- somberest ,with this feeling un-
alle'iated.
Franck's Quintet in F Minor for
string! quintet and piano, the last
number to be played, was by far the
most interesting. The first move-
ment, Molto moderato-Allegro, begin-
ning rather feebly, developed into a
pleasing intermingling of two themes.
A religious spirit dominated the mooi
of this as well as the succeedin;
movenents. The second movement
afforded Albert Lockwood, at the
pianoaa chance to consummate the
themes that were first presented by
the, first violin and then carried on
by the string quartet. The music was
soft, and' lolling and for a moment
one' felt "the temptation to close his
eyes and dream of a Ganeden where
proh biiti laws are unknown and life
is relatively unencumbered. If one
did allow himself such a pleasure, the
dream was short-lived as the fire and

spiritof the third movement quicklyj
brought him to a realization of his4
earthliness. Pauline Kaiser, on the
viola, ,cquitted herself admirably,
playing with a feeling and sympathyI
that would be a compliment to any
artist.
In general the interpretation of this
number -s'lowed an admirable feeling
for balance and nuances of beauty.
The composition as .a whole was a bit
long but made Ap for that in its ex-
ceptional lyrical quality After the
conert ope could well realize the
veracity of those critics who hold this
piece as the finest of all Franck's
chamber compositions.
The rendition of the first number
on the program, Brahm's Horn Trio
in E flat, also lyrical in spirit, was
disappointing. The trio composed of
I Maud. Okkelberg, pianist; Samuel P.
Lockwood, violinist; and Perry Mason,
on the horn, seemed to lack the en-
semble spirit. True, the piece does
not allow of a varied display of abil-
ity, such=as it is, it failed to inspire

j

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Iroday-Wednesday
PAULINE STARK
"Honesty The Best Policy'
Thursday,
"TIIE BOY FRIEND"
TJiis "Ad' and 10c
RAE W

7

DANCE AT GRANGER'S
WEDNESDAY
8-10
It takes no more time to enjoy a Wednes-
day night dance at Granger's than ti does to
see a show. You will enjoy the peppy music
of Jack Scott's Wolverines who put lots of
life in these two hours of good time.
GRANGER'S ACADEMY
DANCING

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PAT H S
ON T HE
CAMPS

WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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CORNWELL COAL - COKE
Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke

r
L ,1

FUTURE MICHIGANIC RESOURCES
To The Editor:
Every now and then articles appear,
in The Daily and in The Times-News*
about the expansion of the state of
Michigan, and its future policy. This
is especially true in frequent articlest
featuring the great automobile ex-
pansion of the state. However, at no
time within my three years of residence;
at #gin Arbor do I remember having
read of any discussions on Michigan's,
future natural resources.
It so happens that in the last two
years, at least, our state has come
forth mightily in the production of
petroleum, from a very minute pro-
ducer to a consistently increasing pro-
ducer. This should be of interest,
especially, because of the fact that
our increased production has come
from an exceptionally near area, Sagi-
naw. Since August 1925, when the
first well was drilled, one hundred
and twenty-five wells have produced
oil. The production is gradually on
the increase, several new wells being
sunk every week. Considering the
fact that Michigan heretofore has
been a rather insignificant producer
of this most important resource, it
naturally is important to, watch care-I
fully this Saginaw oil province. Wells
in this area have an initial production
varying from ten to a hundred barrels,
and the production may be increased
by artificial appliances.
More than that, the oil is of an ex-
ceptionally high grade, containing

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of study in Jewish Family Case
Work, Child Care, Community
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Several scholarships and fellow-
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fied students.
Fr information, address
The "Dir'ector
The Training School for
Jewish Social Work
210 W. 91st St., New York City.

This business has been growing ever
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OFFICE, CORN WELL BLOCK
Phones,,Office: 4551-4552 Yard Office: 5152
-

Ii _ _ - -

The entrance of the Cantonesej
troops into the native section of
Shanghai unquestionably marks aI
high point in their victorious advances

U

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