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March 22, 1927 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-22

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 124 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1927 EIGHT PAGES

PflICE FIVE CENTS

PLAYERS TO PRESENT
15 PERFORMANCES FOR
LEAGUE BUILDINGFUNBDI

ROBERT HENDERSON AND OTHER
MICHIGAN GRADUATES
IN COiXIPAN'1Y'
TO GIVE MODERN PLAYS
Due To Their Success Of Last Summer
The Actors Will. Remain Here
For Another Series
The Rockford players, professional
stock company, will give 15 perfor-
mances early in May in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall for the benefit of the Wo-
men's league building fund, it was an-
nounced yesterday. by the Alumnae
council of the University. Robert Hen-
derson, '26, actor manager of the
company, will return with them and'
in the company are several graduates
of the University who were prominent
campus dramatics while here in
school.
The players have completed 30 1
weeks in Rockford, Illinois, and have
been proclaimed by critics to be
among the six finest stack companies'
in the country. Theyswill return next
.season to the Illinois .town for an even
more ambitious program, according to
Henderson.
The company will come here Tues-
day, May 3, and play every night ex-
cept Sundays through Tuesday, May
17, as wvell as two Saturday matinees.
The players vill receive no remunera-
tion, except expenses, and all proceeds
of the performances will be turned
over to the League building fund.
In addition to Henderson the com-j
pany includes Reynolds Evans, lead-
in; man and for the last five years
one of 'the first actors. in Walter
Hampden's repertory company, Amy
Loomis, '22, as leading lady, Betty
Horine, '25, Camille Masline, '26A,
Dale Shafer, '26, Frances Bavier from
the original New York production of
Elliot Nugent's "The Poor Nut," and
Franklin Wait from the New York run
of "Howdy King."
The plays to be given here will in-
chide 'their five outstanding successes
in Rockford, each one being given
three times though not successively.
All of the plays are modern and list
the outstanding successes of recent
theatrical seasons. "The Firebrand,"
\ Joseph Schildkraut's success with its
parody of Benvenuto Cellini and his
dashing times will be the first. "The
Last of Mrs. Cheyney," which was
given its first stock production in this
country by the Rockford players be-
fore Ina Claire and Roland Young had
finished the road tour with the orig-
inal cast, will be the second. "The
Green Goddess," a melodrama by
George Arliss, "The Intimate Strang-
ers," a comedy by Booth Tarkington
that was presented recently by Billie
Burke and Alfred Lunt, and "Pigs," a
comedy by John Golden complete the 1
repertoire.
All of the plays will be given in,
Sarah Casweil Angell hall, which has
recently been redecorated.
The Rockford company will also re-
main in the city for another series of 1
summer plays in thesame hall for the
benefit of the Women's league fund,
following their success last summer.
The entire cast, with some possible
additions from caipus talent. will re-
main for the summer, and will be he
only professional theatrical company
engaged by an educational institution.
GREEN ACCEPTS'
INVITATION FOR
GRIDIRON DINNER!
Gov. Fred W. Green, '98L, will be a
guest at the fifth annual Gridiron
Knights' banquet, to take place April
5 at the Union, unless some unex-
pected engagement should prevent his
coming, according to a telegram re-
ceived from Lansing yesterday by
Wilton Simpson, '27, general chair-
man of the affair.
Governor Green, the message stat-
ed, will be present at, the banquet,
though pressed with various other en-
gagements and trips, unless some ur-
gent State business demands that he

remain in East Lansing at that time.
"Other guests of the annual 'razzfest'
sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi, na-
tional journalistic fraternity will be
announced later," stated Simpson.
SENATE CANCELS
UNION ELECTIONS
Election of three of its members
to the board of directors of the Union
was postponed by the University Sen-
,e. at it third regular meeting, yes-

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Results Of Nationial Survey On Honor
System Explained By Prof. A. D. Moore
Editor's Note: ' au Beta Pi, engineer- Igether indicate very definitely the
ing honor society, is working through the
medium of 5o chapters to complete a sur need for such a survey, and it is fur-
vey of the Honor System situation in so thermore evident that the findings,
of the principal engineering colleges of the
country. Prof. A. D. Moore of the En- and the conclusion to be drawn from
gineering college, University of Michigan, the findings, should not be withheld
who,'as president of Tau Beta Pj, is con- from those who may have an interest
ducting the survey, is the author of this Iinthm
series of articles. inthem.
First Installment: Reports have been received cover-
11 ing the engineering colleges of the, 33
In 1925 the writer proposed to the following institutions: Alabama uni-
national Tau Beta Pi convention that versity, Arkansas university, Cali-
t would be a good thing for the so- fornia university, California Technical
(Institute, Colorado university, Yale'
iety to interest itself in the promul- unsterstt,,CGeorgia Technrsalyolle
university, Georgia Technical college, ;
,ation of student honor, and in par- Armour institute, Purdue university,
icular, to investigate the Honor sys- Iowa State college, Kentucky univer-
em situation in the chartered colleges sity, Maine university, John Hopkins
>f the country. Since then a survey university, Worcester Polytechnical
has been in progress; and at the pres- institute, Michigan State college, Mich-
nt writing 33 chapters have respond-! igan College of Mines, Michigan uni-
d to a questionnaire sent out last fall. versity, Minnesota university, Missouri
In some cases only the question- university, Montana State college, Ste-!
faire has been filled out and return- vens institute, North Carolina State
d; but in many instances the student college, Case School' of Applied
naking the report has added a letter. Science, Cincinnati university, Ohio
the information, discussioi and com- State university, Lehigh university,
dents contained in these letters have Pennsylvania State college, Lafayette1
>een of- great interest and usefulness. college, Texas university, Virginia
Apparently, this is the first Honor university, Washington university, and
ystem survey of a national scope ever West Virginia university.
nade. The facts it has brought to- (Continued on Page Three)

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ARCIET E[TMMSWL HSNIANNUAL BALL DESIGNINEW COMEDY TONIGHT

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Winning Scheme In Class Competition
Is "Elves Garden Party"; Plan
i Picked From Group Of Twelve
BITTINGERGETS PRIZE

Livingstone And Lewis To Take Leads.
Play Is Three Act Farce Comedy
By Kaufman And Connelly
TICKETS NOW ON SALE.

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"Elves Garden Revel" was the win- "To the Ladies," a farce comedy by I
ning design submitted by R. T. Bit- George Kaufman and Marc Connelly#
tinger, '27A, for the annual architects will open at 8:30 o'clock tonight int
May party compeition. This design the Mimes theater. Charles Living-j
was chosen by the architectural so- stone, '28L, who has played a leading'
ciety, and a faculty committee con- part in all of the Mimes productions
sisting of Prof. Albert J. J. Rouseau, this semester, will again take the leadl
Prof. W. C. Titcomb, Prof. Ernest and William E. Lewis, '29, leading1
Wilby, and Prof. Wells I. Bennett, "lady" of the Union opera, will have1
from a group of 12 schemes. Bittinger the principal female role.I
will be awarded a set of architectural The play itself is a three act farce'
books and a ticket to the party. Hon- comedy by the authors of the "Butter
arable mention was given Wolfang and Egg Man." Settings which will be
Qoetze, '30A, Dole Thompson, '27A, used in the production have all beenc
and A. F. Plard, Jr., '28A. IImade in the Mimes theater workshop
Elves and gnomes playing in'a fairy l and though not as extensive as thosej
garden, grossly exaggerated in scale, for some of the others used this year
with huge flower pots, and sundry all of the available equipment of the1
spring flowers will cover the walls. Mimes theater, including special light-
Huge beetles and spiders will lurk in ing effects, will be used in the play.
the tall grass. A golden spider web Besides Livingstone and Lewis,
will float over the floor; deep blue sky leading parts will be taken by Leslie
with twinkling stars will be seen Stewart, '27Ed., a new man to campus
through the complicated geometrical dramatics, and Lyman Crane ,'29, who
maze of the spider web. played the part of Dr. Hallmeier in
. The orchestra will play on a huge "R. U. R." Stewart will take a femi-
mushroom, with smaller mushrooms nine part.
for seats. An old tree stump will The entire cast will number 14, and
house the chapprons and the recep- officers of Mimes believe that great,
tion committee. Instead of sitting on credit is due the company for its
the floor, or on sawdust piles, as has ability to stage the show with only a
been done previously, the guests this week of rehearsals. The short period
year will sit upon garden snakes. of rehearsing was made necessary by.
This year's lights will be clusters of the late arrival of the manuscripts and
bittersweet berries and fruits. a great deal of intensive work was
An effect of tiny. people dancing in necessary. /
a gigantic garden i8 the aim of Bit- More than 150 of the seats for to-,
tinger in presenting this scheme. This night have been reserved by Ann Ar-
will be done by an exaggeration in bor High school teachers, and the salej
the scale of the flowers and elves, otherwise has been large also, accord-
which will dwarf the dancers. The ( ing to officers of Mimes,. who antici-
colors will be harmonious, and con- pate -sell-outs for each of the five per-
sist mainly of yellow and green. formances.
There will be an exhibition of the Tickets are priced at 75 cents and
best designs submitted in the com- I may be reserved by telephone at the1
petition, including that of Bittinger's. Union or purchased at the box office
Arrangements for the exhibition have of the Mimes theater. The play will
not yet been settled; however, it will be given every night this week.
be given in the near future, accord-I
ing to Willianr Preston, '28A, pres-
ident of the architectural society. T H PALL F ALS
TO PASS SENATE
COIF ELECTIONS I LANSING, March 21-The capital
ARE ANNOUNCED punishment bill, which has been the
Imost stubborn handicap to the dis-l
Elections to Coif, senior honorary !position of state legislation, finallyl
society of the Law school, were an- has been delegated to the scrap heap.
nounced yesterday when a list of ie The Senate judiciary committee last
)ifneeti. members who received this week refused to support the Arm,
honor was made public. strong-Palmer electric chair bill. A pe-
The men elected are as follows: tition bearing the signature of 16 mem-
Robert W. Conder, Howard L. Wah- bers was presented requesting the re-
renbrock, William B. Giles, Sidney L.Ilease of the measure, but the commit-f
Robins , Arthur Wood, Frederick J. tee still refused to act.
Schumann, Edgar H. Ailes, James E. Indications point toward a discon-'
Duffy, Arthur L. 'larding, Edgar C. tinuance of further attempts being
Howbert, Richard W. Lenske, Ben- made to force the issue. As soon as
jamin Namir, Edward K. Senison, the bitterness engendered by the sup-i
Glenn L. Barney, Roy Weiss, Carl L. porters of the death penalty in their
Whilcburch and Albert M. Stern. disappointment of the committee's
action has subsided, it is believed that
RAPIER PUBLISHES the assemblage will settle down to
consider the opposite branch meas-
CURRET , NMBERures.
Further reports relative to the con-
"The Rapier, an Intercollegiate Re- struction of the new prison at Jack-
view," has recently published its third son are expected from Gov. Green this
issue, which is being placed on sale week. The Governor submitted a spe-
in the State street stores. The maga- cial message a few days ago recom-
zine is a bi-monthly publication and mening part of the project to beI

MUSSOLINI DEMNS
ARMAMENT EQAL TO
EUROPEANCOUNTRIES
GENERAL MARINIS' DECLARATION
FEATURES FIRST DAY OF
LEAGUE OF NATIONS
SEEKS PARWITH FRANCE:
EnglNis Delegate Proposes Measuring
Tonnage Of Ships In Relation
To Their Categories4
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, March 21-Italy never
will accept armaments inferior to
those of any other country in Conti-
nental Europe said General Marinis,'
Italian delegate to the League of Na-
tions preparatory commission on dis-
armament, which began its session
here today in search for a formulaI
for a general disarmament treaty.
General Marinis' declaration makes
it clear that Premier Mussolini will1
insist on keeping the Italian arma-;
ments on a level with those of France. i
His pronouncement was the most
striking feature of the first day's de-i
liberations, coming as it did at a time
when tension is reported between
Italy and Jugo-Slavia which is report-
ed friendly to France. The first day
also brought the presentation by Vis-1
count Cecil of England of a complete
draft of a treaty of armament reduc-
fion. Paul Boncour of France also an- I
nounced that later he would present a.
French draft which vould differ fromI
the British plan in a notable essential.;
The draft introduced by Lord Cecil
provides for carrying out naval limi-
tations by measuring tonnage by cate-
gories of ships, as favored by tl!
American experts, instead of fixing
the total tonnage of all warships, as
advocated by the French and Italians.
Ingeniously avoiding dragging in the
council of the Leaue as a supervisory
body, it stipulates that Germany, Great
Britain, the United States, Italy,
France and Japan, "or the countriesI
represented in the council" may de- I
cide upon measures to safeguard the
peace of nations in case a signatory
should violate the provisions of the
disarmament treaty.
General Marinis in his declaration
said Italy would be wiling to acoept
drastic imitation of armament if suli
limitations were fairly proportional.
CLASSES IN RIOT
AT JOHN HOPKINS
(By Associated Press)
ANNAPOLIS, Md., March 21.-Ap-
peals were made to Governor Ritchie
tonight to call out the militia to stop
a riot at the National Guard armory
here between sophomores and fresh-
men of Johns Hopkins university,
Baltimore. The governor declined to
take the drastic action until other
means had failed, and at 10 o'clock,
two hours after the class battle had
its inception every available fire en-_
gine in the city was pumping streams
of water on milling sophomores out-
side the armory, within which the
freshmen were attempting to hold
their annual class dinner.
More than 30 students, it was esti-
mated by police and officers of the two
student classes, were hurt, four seri-
ously. Most of those injured, to es-
cape arrest, evaded police and hos-
pitals. Three were taken to Annapo-
lis emergency hospital for treatment.
They were: John Grayson Pattengill,
of Powsons, Md., possible fracture of
the skull by a blow from a police-
man's stick. Gladstone Bladenkoff,
Baltimore, slashed behind the ear by
a partoman's stick.
Erwin A. Gordon, Baltimore, injuries
to head and neck suffered in a fall

down a stairway. Baldwin Street of
Baltimore suffered an injury to his
arm but broke away from persons whoj
took him to a drug store "or tre, twE nt.
The Annapolis armory, after two
hours of fighting, was almost wr ci-
ed.
Nearly every window in the struc~t
ture had been broken and the outer
walls were pitted by bullets fired over
the heads of the rioters by Annapolis!
police in their initial attempt to stop
the fight. The revolvers had no effect, I
and after emptying their guns, the po-
lice jumped into the fray with their
sticks.
YOUNG DISCUSSES
REFORESTRATION
"Conservation and Reconstruction"
would be a more appropriate title for
the present State Conservation depart-
ment, said Leigh J. Young, former

Gabler, '28, Elected
Leader By Champion
Michigan Puck Team
Cornelius Gabler, '28, star defense
man for two years, was elected to
captain the 1927-1928 Michigan hockey
team last night at a banquet cele-
brating the sharing of the Conference
honors with Minnesota in the season
just closed.
In giving the first speech of the eve-
ning, Coach Elton E. Wieman, assist-
ant director of intercollegiate ath-
letics paid tribute to the champion-j
ship puck team which brought thej
eighth Big Ten championship to Mich-j
igan in tpe last two years. He went
further to laud the men for their up-
hill fight which carried them to a tie
with Minnesota when after losing two
of their first three Conference games
the team won five straight contests,
all of them by one goal. Coach Wie-
man also remarked of the great
growth of minor sports at Michigan
and said that Michigan is now knownj
equally well in this field as in that ofj
major sport competition. He also an-
nounced that gold watch charms in the1
form of pucks with cross sticks wouldj
be given to the team.
Dr. Joseph E. Barss. Varsity coach
for five years, lauded the team as the
best ever to represent Michigan. "Any
team that can win five games inI
eight days, all by a single goal, an.d
three of them in overtime periods
must be rated a great team," the
coach stated. This is Coach Barss' last
year at Michigan and in addition to
his absence next year's team will be
without the services of five of this
season's nine letter men, and two,
AMA winners. Besides Steve Jones, re-;
tiring captain, Hooper, Larson, Sibil-
sky, and Comb are the letter men who
are seniors. Two 'of the AMA men,
Gomberg and Denton will also be lost.
As a token of appreciation of his
services to hockey, the team presented
a cigarette case to Coach Barss.

Relation Of Oxygen To The Treatment
Of Pituemonia Is Dealt With By
litedical Society Speaker

PHI IA SIGMA Will,!

ISHANGHAI ISStE'N FSRE
FIGTIN AN fMEROUS RIOTS1
FOREIGN SEgTIONIS I.NVADED
British Arn'ored Cars And Soldiers Are
Fired Upon W~hile Shells Land In
International Settlement
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
MOSCOW, Barcth 21.-Soviet Russia rejoiced today over the fall oil
Shanghai. Government wireless stations flashed to every corner of the
Soviet union the news that the "world citadel of lpiperialism" had captivated
to the nationalists. Demonstrations were organized by factory workers and
government employes to celebrate the event.
Moscow newspapers published extra editions telling of the capture of
China's greatest port. Groups of people gathered on the street corners to
discuss the momentous news, which the Bolsheviks regard as meaning the
definite triumph of the Chinese revolution.
SHANGHAI, March 21.-The native city of Shanghai, China's
greatest port and most important trade city, which fell into the hands
of the Nationalists this morning, was seething tonight with bitter street
fighting and turbulent riots.
Sitting on the leg of the boiling cauldron and guarding the
37,000 inhabitants of the international settlement, were 15,oo foreign
protective forces, including 1,500 United States marines, backed by
the big guns of the large international fleet in the Whangtoo river

ENDS LECTURE SERIES

ji 111 L I i llI i LI U11I
National Frosh Scholastic Fraternitys
To hold Annual Organization
Banquet At Union Tonight j
LITTLE WILL SPEAK
Forty-eight freshmen from the lit-
erary, engineering, pharmacy, and
architectural colleges will be initiated
into Phi Eta Sigma, national fresh-!
man scholastic fraternity for men at
the annual banquet of the organiza-
tion tonight at the Union. .
President Clarence Cook Little will
deliver the principal address of the
banquet. Dean John R. Effinger of
the literary college, and Dean George
W. Patterson of the engineering col-
lege will also speak briefly. J. A.
Bursley, dean of students, wil act asf
toastmaster. All are honorary mem-
bers of. the organization.
All freshmen with a scolastic aver-
age equal to half "A" and half "B"'
with a minimum of 11 hours work,
i carried either for the first semester of
their first year or the entire year en- I
I titles them to membership in the fra-
ternity. Advanced hours credit and
credit transfers, however, are disre-
garded in making the selections for
memberships. The fraternity was
founded by Thomas Arkle Clark, dean
of men of the University of Illinois.
Initiation ceremonies will begin at;
4:30 o'clock and the banquet -wiil take I
place at 6:15 o'clock. k
RADIO FREQUENCY
WAVESIS NATURE;
OF STUDENT TALKI
Assisted by a model illustrating the

Respiration with its various dis-
orders, and the relation of oxygen
to the treatment of pneumonia cases'
in particular, formed the basis of a
talk last night in Natural Science
auditorium by Dr. Carl A. L. Buiger,
of the Rockefeller Institute for med-
ical research.
Dr. Buiger's lecture was the fourth
and last of a series which Alpha
Omega Alpha, honorary medical so-
ciety, have sponsored throughout the
year, in an attempt to interest those
who are outside the field of medicine
and at the same time enlighten those
in the faculty and student body of the
Medical school. The speake;'s have
always been men who are prominent
in some one field of endeavor, and
who have a special message.
Dr. Buiger's topic was "Disorders
of Respiration: Clinical and Experi-
mental Studies," and the talk consist-
ed for the most part of delineation of
various experimens with oxygen and
their ultimate effect on the treatment
of disease. He spoke at length con-
cerning the beginnings of respiratory
study, from the old beliefs which held
the heart to be the center of animal
heat, to the developments of The 17th
century, when James Boyle-founder
of Boyle's law-first saw the analogy
between breathing and the burning
of a candle. First attempts at artifi-
cial respiration were described, and
Dr. Buiger detailed the work of Johnj
Mayow of Oxford and of Joseph
Priestley, and in conclusion lauded
Lavoisier for putting the various dis-
coveries together for the most prac-
tical good.
Details were given regarding the
trip made by several modern doctors
and scientists to Peru, where a labor-
atory was set up in the tops of the
Andes. 16,000 feet above sea level, for
the purpose of study of oxygen :.ecre-

Several times today the foreign set-
tlement felt reverberations of the
chaos reigning in the native city, but
tonight it was very quiet with its
residents obeying the warning to re-
main indoors.
One of the most serious of the day's
incidents occurred tonight when a
band of Chinese .soldiers, assumably
attached to the retreating northern
army, brokp through the barrier to
the north of the international settle-
me t and began looting. Two British
armored cars sped to the scene in
respone to calls from the police.
Lieutenant Newman, Corporal Ains-
lee, and two British soldiers were
wounded, although not seriously, by
machine gun fire which was directed
at the first car. The second car towed
the leading one away under heavy
fire, at the sime time returning the
fusilade.
Americans Patrol Mill Districts
Soon after the vanguard of the Can-
tont-se army had entered the native
city this morning, the municipal coun-
cil declared a state of emergency and
landing parties of all nationalities
represented in the Shanghai naval
concentration, including 1500 Marines,
disembarked. The Americans are
patrolling the northern and western
mill districts where trouble is likely
to develop because of the general
strike. The marines were in full
equipment including metal helmets
and machine guns.
The situation created by the retreat
of the northern group and the advance
of the southerners was one of the
greatest gravity for the foreign pop-
ulation and its defenders. With a gen-
eral strike effective and the streets
filled with truculent natives, the po-
sition of the international settlement
was fraught with danger.
Sniping and fighting between Brit-
ish and Chinese troops-possibly
northerns-resulted in, the death of
two British bunjabi soldiers and the
wounding of ten other soldiers and
police. There were no reports tonight
that Americans had been involved in
the fightin "
Situation Is Chaotic
Although the international settle-
ment was ,uiet tonight after a day
of 'turbulence, the situation in the
native city was chaotic. The advance
guards of the Nationalists, consisting
of plain clothes forces, who invaded
the city this morning, were fought by
the retreating Cantonese and the
White Russians which created a reign
of terror which continued tonight.
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
SHANGHAI ,March 21.-E vacn -
ation of all foreign women and
children still remaining in Nank-
ing began at) daylight today be-
cause of the close approach of
fighting between the Nationalists
and northern forces and the
prospect of disturbances.
LONDON, March 21.-An American
detachment of volunteers in Shanghai
prevented 500 postal employees from
mraching through the interatina
settlement today to the Cahpei native
district to participate in the fighting
there . s. cn r3;nnth totha ynAn

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properties of high frequency in the tion. Here various tests and observa-
electric flow of wires, Robert R. tions were made upon the iatlver and
Swain, grad., spoke on "Radio Frequ- upon each other. Afterwa ds thO results
ency Measurements" before a meet- were tabulated and clinical applica-
ing of the student branch of the Ame- tion was made in regard to pneumonia
rican Institute of Electrical Engineers symptoms.
yesterday afternoon in Natural Science Dr. Buiger described the apparatus
auditorium. which is now used in the laboratories
Swain showed how the wave length where he is associated, in particular
of an electric wave might be meas- I special oxygen chambers for the
ured by the use of an ordinary yard- treatment of pneumonic patients, the
stick. The process as the lecturer ex- access to which is made through a
n. p +tiest.avsn ,+,-.,.;form of lock so -as to prevent the

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pianea I,ISLo nave an naca or
showing that the transmission line is
responding to that wave; the distance
between the closed or short circuited
end and the indicator is measured by
simple linear measurement and the
wave length computed by use of the
formula. Because the velocity of the
wave on the wire and the velocity of
the wave in free space are the same,l
t;h ms .-,nrs ePnzt0; Nin airme nro-

passage of air from the outside.
In conclusion the speaker stated
that the studies and results of the
oxygen experiments were not being
put forward as another specifically
curative measure, but instead as an
aid until such time as the patient is
more able to fight for his own condi-
tion. The lecture was accompanied
by lantern slides throughout, showing

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