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March 16, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-16

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MnACH 1, 192

I ---am III
k

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Ainociation. '
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Eitered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
Iiaster (,eneral.
subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Thusiness 21214.
EDTOAL STAFF'
Telephine 4I25F,
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY. JR.
Editor................W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor... ............Irwin A. Oliana
News Editors............t d e.rik Shillito
Women's'Editor........ ....Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............ Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Edi'or...........Morris Zwer ing
Music and Drama.........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Caton C mhape St nferd N. Phelpe
jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
James Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters
Marion Anderson Pao Kern
Margaret Arthur Milton Kirshbaum
Jean C--behll Sally Knox
Jessie Church. Richard Kurvink.
tacter L~.. Clark G. ThomasMcef
' r K th Patick an
,Blanchard W. Cleland Mary Ptolemy
t.v.IX sc 4cisoia '"t Morils 4.uin
William Emery James Sheehan
Alfred Let Pester Nelson 3. Smith, Jr.
Robert E. Finch Sj is Stone
Robert Gessner Mary Louise Taylor
Margaret Gross William Thurnau
Mate Gruber liiltord Vanik
Coleman . Glencer Herbert E. Vedder
Harvey .Gunderson Marian Welles
Stewart ooker Thaddeus Wasielewski
Morton B. Icove Sherwood Winslow

was the unanimous decision of the
Supreme court in upholding the
Fourteenth Amendment.
THE RIGHT MIETHOD)
Continuing his policy of making
non-political appointments to diplo- l
matic posts, President Coolidge has
granted three more ministerial posts
to men long trained in the foreign
service.
These selections bring , to a totg l of
15 the *diplomatic career appoint-
ments which President Coolidge hys
made as compared with 10 politic 1
choice . They have very evidently
been made in accord with the spirit
of the Rogers act of 1924, which 'pro-
vided among the various improve-
ment* in the consular and diplomatic
service that the Secretary of State
give the President from time to time
the names of members of the service
who have demonstrated their fitness
for promotion to the grade of min-
ister.
The President's hearty response to
this suggestion should be very satis-
fying to the men seeking to make the
diplomatic service their life work, as
it should be satisfactory to the nation
which will thus be well represented
,abroad. Likewise, it should be quite
satisfying to the President by increas-
ing the public esteem for his admin-
istrative abilities, and by enabling
him to avoid the political emnity
which might come from many candi-
dates after the political appointment
of a few.

TO~sE~ OLL
We are pleased to announce that
The Daily editorial side is to play'
the business boys in a game of base-,
ball in the near future. It used to be
a tradition years ago, but the business
side lost so often that they refusedj
to continue it.
* * a
Wisconsin is to debate here Friday j
night on some question about legis-,
lative control of courses offered in1
colleges. The resolution as stated is1
long enough, but the original one wast
worse yet. It ran like this:
"Resolved, That legislative pre-
scription, disapproval or prohibition;
of special doctrines, theories, or data
on the contents of courses offered in1
Educational institutions are contrary,
to public welfare."
e * * *
It would be rather difficult to keep '
a subject like that in mind so that you
would know when the debaters got off
the subject.
* * *

SMusic and Drama

?i
_
i_
_

THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ Re-
cital in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: "Eight 'til Eight," the

G R A H A O
GRAHATS T
For Your Convenience--Two Stores Completely Stocked
At Both Ends of the Diagonal
:d1111I1111111111i 11E11111111 I I1-- 1111111111110 11111111111111111111111111fll11111111111.11111ii1111111111111111111ll ii 111111111111111111 t

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising..............William C. Pusch
Advertising............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising............ eorge H. Anable, Jr.
Advertsng...........Laurence J. Van Tuyl
Circulation.............T. Kenneth Haven
Puiblication............. ...John H. Bobrink
ccount.......... .Fracis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Abu Jr. Esther Booze
D. M. Brown Hilda Binzer ~
Ylorence Cooper Marion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hulse Selma M. Jansen
R. A. Meyer Marion Kerr
William F. SpenceMarion L. Reading
Harvey Talcott Harriet C. Smith
Harold Utley Nance Solomon
Ray Wachter Florence Widmaier
J. B. Wood
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1927
Night Editor-STANFORD N. PHELPS
TIME TO ACT
After futilely waiting for Congress
to devise some constructive action in
regard to the Great Lakes-St. Law-
rence waterway, Secretary Hoover has
suggested that Canada and the United
States establish a "joint governmental
body in the nature of a St. Lawrence
corporation or authority" which would
carry through the project.
This propsal has been wisely ad-
vanced by a man who has thoroughly
studied the construction of inland
waterways. During the last six years,
the creation of a waterway from the
Great Lakes to the Atlantic, which
would be suitable for ocean traffic,
has been investigated and reported on
by-more than a half dozen competent
committees. It has been almost uni-
versally acknowledged by these bodies
that the St. Lawrence route is a desir-
able one, and that it is superior to the
rival ruote through New York state.
In view of the advantages which
the canal would bring particularly to
the vast area of the Middle West, it
s certainly time that a suggestion
such as that made by Mr. Hoover be
followed.
ATTENTION SMITH AND VARE
The arguments of Smith and Vare
for admission to the United States
Senate have received another severe
blow with the decision of the Su-
preme court regarding federal author-
ity over party -rimaries. The decision,
rendered in a case concerning the
right of a Texas Negro to participate
in a Democratic primary, states clear-
ly that federal authority exists over
the primaries since the primaries are
part of the general election and there-
fore subject to congressional control.
Attorneys for Smith and Vare have
contended that Congress has no con-
trol over the primaries, and still
maintain that .the decision - has not
altered Athe soundness of their posi-
tion. Yet, for If that they wdill h/e
to dig up further arguments to get
their clients admitted to the Senate.
The decis ' may have far reaching
effects in o or matters than (1 Vare
and Smith controversy. It may be
the beginning of a congressional juris-
diction and control over primaries
for the nomination of all senators and
rpnrsentatives. Most important,

HAND-TO-iWOUrH BUYING
The buyers strike of 1920 brought
into being a new economic condition,
"Hand-to-mouth buying" or buying
for immediate requirements. It is a
question whether this new order is a
benefit or a menace to business. Is
this method of buying the manifesta-
tion of a recent development towards
healthy conservation which will more
evenly distribute the sales of the man-
ufacturer, or does it force the produ-
cer to cut down his production in or-
der to play safe, since he has no
long time contracts to insure his re-
serve? There is little doubt that the
new system is beneficial to the mid-
dleman and retailers, but it is debat-
able whether it forces all the risk
of business upon the manufacturer or
not.
The general concensus of opinion is
that the increase in efficiency of the
railroads makes it possible to buy on
shorter notice without any indefinite-
ness as to the time of delivery. It is
only natural that retailers, middlemen,
and jobbers should be content with
hand to mouth buying since it exten-
sively cuts down the amount of work-
ing capital necessary in their occu-,
pation. There is still, however, a great
deal of argument among the manu-
facturers as to the good of short time
buying.
From the standpoint of the manu-
facturer buying for immediate re-
quirements it should also be consider-
ed an asset. In this age competition
is growing stronger, and it is growing
more necessary, therefore, to please
the consumer. If the producers give
the consumers the kind of buying they
wish, consumption will increase, ben-
efitting the producer. Further the
manufacturer will not need, in most
cases, to put as much capital into
his production as before, because in
this age of machinery the element of
time necessary for production is prac-
tically a negligible quantity.
Taking the situation as a whole, it
is scientifically correct and a logical
improvement over the past condition
of long' commitment buying, where a
manufacturer with bundles of con-
tracts, at the decline of the business
cycle, would be unquestionably ruin-1
ed.
FRENCH FORCES
Claiming as its purpose the reduc-
tion of the regular army from aout
700,000 to 400,000 by making every
French citizen, male and female, sub-
ject to military service in time of war,
the Chamber of Deputies has just
passed a new reorganization measure.
Just how far the women of France af-
fected by the new measure will be
called upon to serve their country and
whether or not they will be actually
called upon to bear arms, remains to
be determnied. Several amendments
have been suggested for a decision on
the matter.
One of the questions the Charnbe-r
of Deputies had to decide was what
to do with themselves in time of war.
Durig 'the past wal- ninmeru mem-
ers, were given leay.e of abseng but
were permitted to make speeches be-
fore that body while not on military
duty. The deputies decided that mem-
bers should -either "be in service or
in the cliambe and not botlh it the
same time. However, they did deter-
mine that their members should be
exempt from military service during
hostilities.j
Nnthl under th nw law nr the

DOWN THE DIAGONAL '
"Some enterprising merchant,"
remarked the Jolly Junior yes-
terday, "might set up a stand to
sell stench bombs." sa
* * *
GUESS AT ANOTHER
Dear Tim-You cannot fail to view
with alarm that a newspaper in a
neighboring city has been setting
itself up as the intellectual arbiter
of the state. If intelligence tests are
to be conducted, Toasted Rolls is the
proper medium to be used. I sug-
gest the following as a series of ques-
tions especially adapted to the su- I
perior intellect of university folk: I
1. What is the architectural style
of the Lawyers' Club? of the Museum?'
of the Poly Sci building?
2. Who won the Hobbs-Eddy-Reed
debate?
3. Who donated the William L.
Clements Library of American His-_
tory? j
4. What have the following in com-
mon: (1) Toasted Rolls; (2) Harry
Tillotson; (3) Chief of Police, Ann
Arbor?
5. How many deans are there in
the University?
Si. W. Rock.

NOTICE TO BOMBERS
Rolls has conducted an extensive
survey of places on this campus
where the activities of the bombers,
might actually be conducive to thel
general welfare. We now submit our
list to the latest exponents of this
particular phase of chemical ware-
fare:
The School of Music.
Philosophy lectures
The R. O. T. C. headquarters
Class-rooms on these spring days
The atheltic association offices
Student council meetings
Simon de Mounteiiiort.

twenty-third anual Junor GWrS7 lay,
in ihe Whitney theater at 8:15 o'clock.
"EIGHT 'TIL EIGHT"
A review,by Prof. 0. J. Campbell.
"Eight till Eight" is a good show,
both in the stage sense of the word
and in being lavish, entertainment for
the eye. Marian Welles and her as-
sistant costume designers evidently
have a fine sense for color. Variety,
swift change and startling contrast
in colors make the evening an adven-
ture in some futuristic kalaidoscope
or wherever one can hope ot be so
happily surprised and dazzled. Be-
sides, the girls really do make better
looking girls than the men of Mimes.
It would be too much to expect the
entire cast to be beauties, but the
standard is high.
The next most striking feature is
the spirit-at once full of verve and
sincere charm-which animates this
play more completely than it has any
of its predecessors which I have seen.
We at Michigan should congratulate
ourselves that the Opera and the
Junior Girls' Play do thewsame sort
of thing in such (different ways. The
former is a model of professional
competence; the latter is a perfect
expression of the amateur spirit in a
college activity. "Eight till Eight"
showed last night some of the spon-
taneity compouned of youth and first-
night excitement which professional
casts simply cannot retain. Phyllis
Loughton as director has caught this
precious quality i'n her actors and
moulded it into art. Too great praise
cannot be given to her skill, critical
keenness, and technical knowledge of
the stage. It is reflected in every
movement of the evening. Such gifts
as hers are combined in an under-
graduate about once in fifty years.
That the Junior director of this play
possesses them Is- perhaps the prin-
cipal reason for the excellence of
"Eight till tight" from Eight till
Eleven.
Esther Merrick has written a really
amusing collegiate book. The cen-
tral event is local history. The humor
is that which lies latent in the ab-
surdities of ourselves and does not
demand farce or extravagance. The
story moved forward so easily and
naturally that we did not once hear
the- grinding of the wheels.
The main parts were well taken.
Marjorie Chavenelle, Lois Porter, and
Josephine Mitts as Daisy, Connie and
Helen accomplished the difficult task
of impersonating themselves with
great competece. Connie and Helen
incidentally did a spirited song and
dance with astonishing grace and ef-
fectiveness. Some of the men looked
their parts too well to be funny until
the first soft tones-how dulcet they
did sound-issued from their lips. I
thought Nellie Hoover as Henry the
best man, and Addison Pelletier as the
Lone Kid was superlatively good.
Professor Bobbs, who has miraculous-
ly caught the imagination of the naive
Daisy, though well impersonated, is
only a stage type. We professors are
certainly more ridiculous than we are
made to appear in student plays.
College girls by definition are good
dancers and they danced through this
play. Every five minutes or so there
I was a new chorus before us in some
original evolution or animated sweep
of light and color. The blue-stock-
ing chorus and the aritst waltz de-
serve particular mention. The three
Big Butter and Egg Men aroused the
most laughter and danced expertly.
Marian Van Tuyl's specialty scarf
dance was performed with great skill
I and charm.
The music, written largely by Mar-
garet Cole, is excellently adapted to

the lyrics and all on a high level.
Certain of the songs, particularly "My
True Love is False" and "Eight till
Eight" are distinctive and cling to
the memory. They were hits and will
remain so.
In short we had a very pleasant
evening and prophesy the same for
you.
* * *
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, will present the following pro-
gram this afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in
Hill auditorium:
Allegro Agitato (Sonata II).....
....... Rheinberger
Hora Mystica................Bossi
Liebestraum ...................Liszt
Allegro Vivace (Symphony V)....
.......................... W idor
Lamentation .............. Guilmant
msh Wi~ ~, T 1 F Rn1

MAKE
ON T HE
-
PARTY PROGRAMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
INVITATIONSj
STATIONERY
FOLDERS
NEWSLETTERS
PLACARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
CALLING CARDS
ETC., ETC.

GRANG ER'S
Dancing Tonight
8.10
A congenial crowd
A smooth floor
A peppy band, and
A wonderful time at
-GRANGER'S ACADEMY

. e

Our product
by men and

is preferred
women wnho knov-

j - - - -_r___
215 S. Main St. (off Liberty)
Phone 3231
For Service and Qpality, None Better
---- x

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I E
READ THE WANT ADS

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Thi'rs&Por etter impress ions
PRINTERS
0 cer Moe's Sport Shop
711 N. University Ave.
Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

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OSCAR

* * *
ANNOUNCES
CAN1I)l#ACY FOR
1928 HOP CHAIRMAN

Oscar, wonder horse, '29E, has an-
nounced his intention of running for
chairman of the J-Hop committee
next year. "I know nothing about J-
Hops but I am sure I could get the
'favors for the affair at least," he is
quoted as saying.
Oscar intends to make his candidacy
chiefly on his record as a dishonest
politican. He points out that he cheat-
ed his class out of favors for the
Frosh Frolic, bought second hand
favors for the Soph Prom, and is con-
fident that he will be able to abscond
with the favors for next year's J-Hop.
"That seems to be all that is re-
quired of a J-Hop committee chair-
man," he coyly added.
Kernel.
SIGNS OF SPRING
* *-*
NNIO M11SP, LITTLE DRAMMER
A review, by Count Asparagus.
Rushing in to fill the breach left
by the absence of the first string or-
ganist, an unknown substitute createdI
what is believed to be a new record

-- -~-- -- ~>--~ I U U 11 I

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