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January 30, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-01-30

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1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1927

go WON -, in 11111111111,40

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it, or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub- I
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
. naster General.
Subsciption by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4 . .
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building,,May-
a ard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Husiness 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor............. ....W. Calvin Patterson
City' Editor............Irwin A. Olian
Newy Editor.......... ..-Frederick Shillito
News Editors-.--- { ,Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor......... .... Marion Kubik
Sports Editor........... .Wilton A. Simson
Telegraph Editor........... .Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. all, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behyme Ellis Merry
Carlton Chamnpe Stanford N. Pelp
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
James Herald Cssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burgers henry Thurnau
Joseph BrunswickI
Reporters
Marion Anderson Miles Kimball
Alex Bochnowski Milton Kirshbaum
Jean Campbell Richard Kurvink.
Cheser E. Clark G. Thomas MKean
Claece Edelor' Kenneth Patrick
Earl W. De La VergneMorris Quinn
William Emerv James Sheehan
Alfred Le Foster Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Robert E. Finch Sylvia Stone
Robert Gessner William Thurnau
Elaine Gruber M~ilord Vanik
Coleman J. Glencer Herert E.kVedder
Harvey aJ. Gudersoln arian Welles
Stewart ooker Thaddeus Wasielewki
Morton B. Icove Sherwood Winslow
raul Kern
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising............. Thomas Sunderlad
Advertising...........Gorge H. Annale, Jr.
Advertising............Laurence J. Van Tuyl
Circulation...............T. Kenneth Haven
Publication.................John I. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr. Kay Wachter
Melvin H. Baer J. B. Wood
D. M. Brown .Esther Booze
Florence Cooper Hilda Binzer
Daniel Finley Mrion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hlulse Selma M. Janson
R. A. Meyer Marion Kerr
Harvey Rosenblum Maron L.Reading
William F. Spencer Harriet C. Smith
Harvey Talcott Nance Solomon
Harold Utley Florence Wimaer
SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1927
Night Editor-STANFORD N. PHELPS
"YELLOW" JOURNALISM
A perfect example of the depths to
which "yellow" journalism can de-
scend in catering to the lowest emo-
tions of the reader, utterly regardless
of the facts of the matter, was con-
tained in the edition of the Detroit
Times of Friday afternoon, which car-
reid a banner across the front page
reading "U. of M. Suicide Laid To
Jazz." This head was pure fiction,
written to sell the paper on the
newstands, despite the fact that such
action is contrary to all the ethics ol
decent journalism, needlessly harmed
the reputation of the University, and
did not have an iota of fact to back
it up.
Even the story which the Detroit
Times printed. did not begin to make
such a statement; in fact, it opened
with a question-students are wonder-
ing why this man took his life. And
then the headline writer answered the

question in his banner-a mistake of
which an high school editor would
not be guilty. The first lesson for a'
head writer is that the facts of the
story must be presented briefly and
concisely, yet accurately, in the head.
The man who wrote "U. of M. Sui-
cide Laid to Jazz" has yet to learn
this exceedingly elemental principle.
The investigation has shown that
the man was exceedingly quiet, had
few friends, rarely ever "dated," stu-
died industriously and was maintain-
ing a very high scholastic average.
Practically his only form of amuse-
ment was the moving picture. And
those were the characteristics of the
man whose death the Detroit Times
had the effrontery to lay to "jazz."
While such actions on the part of a
newspaper are tolerated by the peo-
ple who make them financially profit-
able, American journalism will never
reach the plane of decency which it
should, in justice, maintain.
A MISUSED GIFT
Refinement and intellectual enlight-
enment should comprise a large part}
of the benefits to be dericed from a
university education. A college grad-
uate should be able to c'omprehend
and to contribute to any yeasonably
difficult conversation or reading. This
ability to appreciate a cultural situa-
tion is not necessarily the product of
liing- finr veaors in a colleg~e town; it

gave to the Union $20,000 to decorate
and furnish a library room in memory
of her husband, an alumnus of this
University. Pendleton Memorial li-
brary, she intended, was to make GOOD
easier for students the acquisition of (7 R I)E
this culture and refinement. The room GlR1A IE) &
was to be a haven for him who would Since it is the custom to hand in
enter, pick up from the easily acces- postal cards for any courses for
sible cases some book, paper, or mag- which you care to learn the marks,
azine which might strike his fancy, we have prepared two poems to paste
and drop into a comfortable upholster- the cards. Results are 'aranteed

1.
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music
AR's'

ed chair for a few minutes or hours
of uninterrupted restful contact witht
the works of the world's intellectual l
masters.
He who leaves this library, the
donor intended, should carry with him
added refinement and the understand-
ing of the thoughts and labors of
masters of all times, and not with a,
batch of notes for the next day's
rhetoric class ,several hours of rest-
ful sleep, or a volume from a valuable
set of books. Investigation of the1
library at almost any time will reveal
the truth of the note-taking and sleep-
ing, and a glimpse at the room's cases
will prove the presence on the campus
of a few such morons who commit the
heinous act of theft.
Had the University officials failed to
lprovide sufficient study halls and ref-
erence rooms, undoubtedly a woman
of Mrs. Pendleton's ideals would have

V1L C cl Z. U~LJZlC UL UltLC .
TO A WOND ERFUL PROFESSOR
Now is the time of year
When we all begin to feart
Those tests of knowledge true t
And marks handed out by you.*
(Signed)....................
1T0 MY BIlGIT STUDE-NT
I: am sorry the day is here j
When only the best may cheer.
My only advice to you today r
Is that your mark stands as an. . .,.
(Signed) .....................
* * *

DRAMA
ITOMORROW NIGHT: Fritz Kreis-
ler will present the fifth uum ber of
Ilse Choral series i ull auditorium
It 9 o'clock.
j~ * *sI
THE 1REISLER PROGRAM
The following program will be pre-
sented by Fritz Kreisler, violinist, to-
morrow night in Hill auditorium:
Kreutzer Sonata .......... Beethoven
Adagio-Sostenuto-Presto.
Adante con Variazioni.
Presto.
Adagio and Fugue, G minor Bach
(For violin alone)
La Folia (Theme and Variations)

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GRvAHAJTIS
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For Your Convenience--Two Stores Completely Stocked
a ~G RA HAN__S
At Both Ends of the Diagonal
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SKILLED REPAIRING

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"CLIPPY COA TS" NEXT
Now that Clippy has a sundae ntam-
ed after her over at Miss Betsy Ross'
shop, perhaps other stores will 'take
up the idea. Calling some of these
dog-skin coats "Clippy Coats" wouild
be fine.

It is 110W time to make sure that your
Fountain Pen is ready for Exams. We will
charge you nothing for looking it over, or better yet, buy a
The pen that won't balk or run dry in the middle of an exam.
Holds enough ink for ten exams. Six to twelve times as much
ink as other pens.

!
E

I

made arrangements to supply such a
need. On the contrary, students can
find little evidence of library inade-
quacies, except when a search is made
for some place to leisurely and com-
fortably pass the time to advantage
by mere reading. Thus, the Pendleton
Memorial library, although it is very
well patronized at present, neither
satisfies fully the wish of its donor
nor an existing need.
A library in the club at Harvard, in
an attempt to maintain the ideal cul-
tural library, has all members check!
wraps, books and brief cases outside,
and releases books and magazines
only upon the presentation of call
slips. Ungentlemanly persons arej
thus prevented from abusing the
previleges of others in the enjoyment'
of the room.
A definite change in attitude is
needed for the Union library, that
those who use it may know its real
purpose, and co-operate for its attain-
ment. "Don't" may often appear more
bother than they are worth; but a few
regulations against packing the room
not only with hats and coats but also
with text and notebooks, for which
the Union maintains a check-room
and attendant, would make the insti-
tution more unique and useful.
MONEY-BACK EDUCATION
Finding their own interests have!
been served, and urged by no altru-
istic motives whatsoever, several Illi-
nois utility companies have adopted
a policy of paying half the tuition
costs of employees enrolled in ac-
credited institutions of learning. Hun-;
dreds of employees have taken advan-
tage of the plan and further exten-;
sions are proposed.j
Technical and cultural training alike I
have been found to be worth dollars
and cents to the corporations as well
as the workers themselves. Such co-
operation for mutual gain, formerly
rare in industry, is becoming more
and more common. The "half fare" I
educational plan should enjoy further
growth.

i

But they mu
extent of gettin
ual Clippy fur.

st not carry it to the
ag a coat made of act-
, * ,

Rider's Pen Shop
315 State Street

90 YEARS OLD IN ARCII
Let's celebrate the University's
nineticth anniversary," urged
the Jolly Junior yesterday, "by
burning down that 110-year-old
Economics building."

W N

REAL SERVICE

Fritz Kreisler

......r....

Variations

................... Tartinij

I

ei

* * *

Andante Cantabile ..... Tschaikowsky
Lotusland.......Cyril Acott-Kreisler
En Bateau ..................Debussy
SFrasquita Serenade ... Lehar-Ereisler
FDansC Espagnol0e . .......

k

OUR SUGGESTION for a design forI
the Architectics Mav Partv would beF

DANGER AHEAD
That the indecision and the result-
ing defiance by the city of Chicago in
regard to the "water steal" is soon to
bring dangerous complications be-1
comes more and more evident as time
goes by and the government still de-
clines to take any definite stand on
the question. First came the open
rebellion from ,Chicago,\then came the
protest from Canada, and now comes
the necessity of arrangement with
many foreign nations because of the
effect of diversion on the water power
rights of nations with rights in bound-
ary waters.
It becomes more and more evident
that the government must soon make
some absolute decision in this case
that will mark the end of the litiga-
tion and trouble that has resulted.
Chicago may or may not be within
her rights under law and under the
existing circumstances. But the big
thing'is that our government should
not be "'hood-winked" by the city of
Chicago and accept upon her shoul-
ders the damage and ill-feeling re-
sulting from the diversion. For her
to be placed in that position is to
make her the foil for the city of Chi-
cago. And that city is too small a
part of our nation to allow her to take
this liberty.
SAFETY
According to the report just issued
by the Ministry of Transport in Eng-
land the number of deaths resulting

61 : t t.ll v' zG z ray i Io v u a 1, 1s zit eya:a yu u . . . ... . . . . .
the Clippy Stadium, with the sur-. ......Manuel de Falla-Kreisler
rounding park as a background. At i Carl Lamson, accompanist
one end of the room you could have * *
an effigy of the designer hanging. I THE MIES
Comedy Club haviNg completed their
GOOD BYE and good luck. This iallowe'en party in the Mimes thea-
may be our last issue. It all dependshl
on te prfessrs.ter that house will be devoted entire-
on the professors. ly to activities of the Mimes during
the next two weeks. Beginning Tues-
ADD TOUGH BREAKS: To haveg
AAday night, February 15, "The Man of
your worst exam on your birthday. Destiny"'and "Annajanska, The Bol- i
* * * shevik Empress" will be presented by
HELPFUL HINTS the Mimes for four performances, in-
Just a few suggestions for prepara- cluding Wednesday, Thursday and Fi-
tion for the finals: day nights.
If you have studied all during the The plays chosen for the iMnes pre-
year as you should have, you won't sentation are both by Shaw, which has
have to do anything more than look come to mean something in campus
over your notes and then go to a show dramatics. Both are in rehearsal now,
the night before. Therefore, cram all and the complete casts will be an-
night. nounced the day of the first perfor-
* * * mance. "The Man of Destiny" is a
Psychologists tell us that the best satire on the great man of history:
1way to study is.... but what's the use, Napoleon, done in his most grandiose
just cram all night. fashion, and coated with the custo-
* * * mary paradoxes of the Shaw theater;
with his usual impolite suggestion of
T~he ideal way to study is to start
7 he idal ay o sudyis o sartEnglish themes dominant in the back-j
two or three days ahead of the finalsgEnli t
and then take a good long sleep the "t Blhvk Em-
night before. The only trouble with p en".anRevoltioary kom
p ass, a Revolutionary Ronanceletf
thit theory is the first half of it. (in the words of the master) is an x-
tremely short play which will be used
Start in a week ahead to outline the as a curtain-raiser. Shaw himself re-
subject. After covering chapter one, marks: "The modern variety theater
go to the Maj. Then the next night demands for its 'turns' little plays
begin on chapter two, and go to the called sketches, to last twenty minutes
Arc after about ten minutes of it. or so, and to enable some favorite
And so forth, until the night beofre performer to make a brief but dazzl-
the exam. Then go to the Wuerth. ing appearance on some barely pas-
* * * sable dramatIic pretext. . . . Not
Where's That Cutter Ride that we should set down the art of
It begins to look as if the Kentucky the variety theater as something to
Riding boys and Mullisons have the be condescended to, or our own art
weather man br'ibed. They both very as elephantine. We should rather
generously offered to give us a real crave indulgence as u ..-.novices
fast ride in a cutter, and then right fresh from the awful legitimacy of
aethe highbrow theater." And with this
away the weather changed.
* * * as his excuse Shaw turned his pen
towards the nost fertile and popular
Every time we get all set to take a of the fields which he has used for
ride, along comes a rain storm, or a his satire. His only really great in-
heat wave and we have to go to the novation was in that he shortened the
show. action. In fact, the only compliment
he claims to have received is that it
Does anyone know if we will have is the only one of his plays that was
any more winter this winter? not too long. o he immediately made
it a page or two longer, according to
TIME OUT FOR MUSIC his own precept; Embrace your re-
Just as we write these lines, there proaches; they are often glorious in
comes the sound of a dog fight out in disguise!
the alley. Either that or some cats The Mimes are also presenting the
reciting one of those Aesopes fables J-Hop performance of "Front Page
of the movies. Stuff" in the Whitney theater on Sat-
* * * urday afternoon, February 12. The
After stuffing cotton batting in our show, which is a little musty at pros-
ears we went over to the window and ent will be refurbished by a dress re-
opened it. We were imistaken, and we hersal some time or other, and the
hereby apologize to the dogs and cats. swan song will be given providing the
It was just the School of Music tak- leading lady will shave her mustache.
ing a final exam in Voice Training.-
* * * "AFF THAT OFF"
Apparently the whole gang flunked Don Muilaly's comedy success "Laff
terribly. That Off" will be presented by Earl
* * * Carroll on Monday and Tuesday, Feb-
When the class in Bass-Drum ruay 7 and 8, in the Whitney thea-
banging comes up for its bluebook, we ter for two performances.
are leaving to take up quarters in a And speaking of trick props, there
boiler factory. are enough in this show to make the
* * * whole stage crew leave town. To be-
We hope when they get this new gin with there is a radiator, with a

PLEASE
ON THE
CAMPUS

r 1
W V fhcre lA : .ou wau tt o go is:
a Pa~i -Ito .ln- ri-Rrne-Vcnile? 't::
.aTo the 'raii,,o liiil jovao s el al :s? ,..
.I Dowvn the F hioc? To Switzerland
> "1 o Scandinmivia ? TI -IlLmtd?
M: Notoring is n .giitnd and Scotlanid?
: Moderate in cost. Operated by a
r companj (or estuhlishcd remitation i
C~ane G32' ates Student Tours atre idleal fort "
younogpup~(yle Who want to trn'. 40:
agrcc aoly yet very ecouonticaiIy.
:Z. For bowJlets & raes ($485 to $1265) -
TOURS-225 Fifth Ave.,N.Y. :
Mrs. Robt. C. Angell
M2OS81)ay Phone 8782 .
A... .... ... . AA~t .. tAAAA a tI. A'+4L t t.... :
+p l9

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NEWSLETTERS
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ETC., ETC.

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215 S. Main St. (off Liberty)
Phone 3231
For Service and Quality, None Better

ESTA1L.ISHED 181
M O UO FY-

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MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET
NEW YORK
-Our representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER
DETRIOT
on the following days
during the coming season
February14, 15, 16 -
March 21, 22, 23'
April 25, 26, 27
May 26, 27, 28
Send for BROOKS'S Miscellany
BOSTON PALM BEACH N E W POR

W E give you a solid
foundation in all com-
mercial branches, that will
put you in a commanding

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