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March 10, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-10

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ESTABLISHED
I 1890

it I

Li ti

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

0

VOL. XXXVII. No. 114

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARDOR. MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE -FIVE CENTS

- .

JAPANESE REFUGEES
STRUGGLE TO BRING
ORDER FROM CHAOS
EARTIIQUAKE KNOWN TO HAVE
TAKEN TOLL OF MORE
TI'AN 2,000 LIVES
50,000 ARE HOMELESS
Towns Of Miyau And Mineyama Are
ilt Hardest: Earth Fissures
Make Relief Difficult
(y Associated Press)j
TOKIO, March 9-Thousands of re-
fagees In central Japan, shivering,
hungry, and in sore need of medical
aid, tonight were struggling to bring
order out of the chaos created Mon-
day night by the earthquake which
already is known to have taken a toll I
of more than 2,000 lives.
Home Offiee Reports
The home office this afternoon stat-
ed that its latest advices showed that
2,275 persons were killed and 3,441
injured. Information received by To-
kio newspapers, however, indicated
that the dead in the entire earth-
quake region would number more
than 3,000 while one newspaper es-
timated that the total would amount
to 5,000 with from 50,000 to 75,000
homeless.
Mineyama is understood to have
been hit the hardest, and one unoffi-
cial estimate is that fully 2,500 per-
sons lost their lives there, either kill-
ed by falling building material or
caught in the ensuing fire.
High Estimates Givenf
The T'okio Asahi Shmbun (a news-
paper) estimates the dead in the en-
tire earthquake region at more than
3,000 while the Tokio Nichi Nichi
Shimbun gives 5,000, with from 50,000
to 75,000 homeless.
An Asahi correpondent says the
town of Amino, of 4,000 population,
was nearly destroyed, with the num-]
her of dead, and injured inestimable.
More than 200 were killed and 500 in-
jured in the collapse and burning of
a theater. Troops were digging the
bodies from the ruins. The refugees,
many of them injured, presented a
pitiful spectacle, their misery accen-
tuated by the snow and cold and their
terror continuing owing to constant
earth rumblings.-
The snow, together with the fis-
sures opened in the earth by the con-
vulsions, have greatly retarded at-
tempts to get relief to the sufferers
by automobiles, and food is being car-
ried by coolies. Physicians have ar-
rived at Iwataki and Yamada and are
treating the injured in a constant
stream.
Scenes are Described
Harrowing scenes are described by
a correspondent for the Asahi who
visited the ruins of Mineyama. Many
of the survivors, he says, are wander-
ing about aimlessly, seemingly made
temporarily insane by their exper-~
ience. One boy was found sitting by a
roadside clasping the bones of his
father, recovered from the ashes of
their home.
Numerous cracks were opened in
the earth throughout the affected dis-
trict, ail in some places fissures are
three feet across. Roads were also
blocked by landslides and avalanches.
It is estimated that three weeks will
be required to repair the railways.
The province of Tangd is not econ-
omically important. Its main indus-
trial production is crepe silk, which is
made entirely for Japanese consump-
tion. Commercial and industrial cen-
ters like Osaka, Kobe, Kyoto and Na-
goya experienced a severe shock, but

official investigation show that the
damage in these place's was insignifi-
cant and that) business activities are
proceeding as ausual.
After Shocks Severe
A number of the after shocks felt
in the Tango district yesterday were
severe enough to shake down crumb-
ling walls. The telephone and tele-
graph lines are still badly crippled.
It is reported that a tidal wave,
which followed the earthquake, se-
verely damaged Yamada and other
fishing villages on the coast.
FOREIGN STUDENTS
PRESENT PROGRAM
Michigan's 11th annual Internation-
al Night was held last. night in Hill
auditorium under the auspices of the
Cosmopolitan club.
A review of International
Night will be found in the Music
and Drama column on page four.
Students and actors from 11 nations

FROW'Mf FROLIC TICKETS I
TO BE ON ,SALE TODAYI

I I

Tickets for the annual Frosh
Frolic to be held Friday eve-
ning, March 18, in the Union
ballroom, will be on gener'al sale
today at the main desk in the
Union as well as in the lobby
of Angell hall, from 2 to 5
o'clock. The ticket sale has been
brisk and will continue during
the week until the 250 limit has
been reached. They are priced
"at $5.00 per couple.

iI

WILL LEAVE TODAY
ON SPEAKING TOUR
Fielding H. Yostj
COACH YOST TO TAKE'
SHORT SPEAKING TRIP
Will Address Alumni Club And Civic
Coups As Well As Ofieite
At Collegiate Relays
WILL TALK IN DETROIT
Fielding I3. Yost, director of inter-
collegiate athletics, will leave today
for a three week speaking trip through
the southern section of the country
and will return to speak in Michigan
before leaving for an eastern tour.
Besides addressing alumni clubs and
civic groups Coach Yost will officiate
at two collegiate relays and address
a college convocation.
Tonight he will address the Detroit
Athletic club in Detroit. At this gath-
ering there will be the athletes and
athletic officials of all the Detroit
high schools, in addition to the mem-
bers of. the athletic club and bus-
iness men interested in sports.
Coach Yost will not speak again
until March 21, when he travels to
New Orleans. However, he will not
be in Ann Arbor during the inter-
vening time. In New Orleans he will
speak to a gathering of isouthern
alumni. On March 25 Coach Yost wil
be an honorary official at the Texas
Relays, which is the classic track
event of the Southwest. On the day
following he will again act in the ca-
pacity of official at the Rice Relays
in Houston, Texas. Rice College has
held relays for numerous years and
the 1927 relay is planned to surpass
previous meets in the number of con-
testants participating. In the evening
after the relay Coach Yost will ad-
dress the Michigan alumni at Hous-
Iton.
Coach Yost will then travel north
to speak in Tulsa, Okla. on March
28 before a gathering of alumni and
college athletic coaches.
These addresses will complete his
southern itinerary and he is expected
to be back in Ann Arbor April 1. On
that evening he will address the De-
troit Yacht Club, which is holding a
Michigan night for the Detroit stu-
dents and alumni.
Coach Yost will then speak in sev-
eral Michigan towns, first at Alma
to a group of high school students
and members of the Alma civic clubs,
and then at the Kiwanis district con-
vention at Kalamazoo. These talks
will be given on the fifth and sixth
of April, respectively.
Following his Kalamazoo address,
Coach Yost will leave for his eastern
trip. He will attenda Michiganealum-
ni rally at Washington, D. C., to
be held on April 9. Syracuse Uni-
versity is holding a convocation on
April 26 at which Coach Yost will be
the principle speaker. On that same
evening he will address the alumni
of Schenectady, N. Y.
This will complete Coach Yost's
speaking tours through the South and
East. His general subject for discus-
sion is the administrative problems of
athletics, however, the majority of his
talks will be on sportsmanship and
the "athletic attitude."

GROUP MAY FORM
NEW STUDY CLUB
IOrganization of a student Mathe-
matics club is the purpose of a meet-
ing; to be held tonight at 7:30 in room
3201 Angell hall, at which time Prof.
James W. Glover, chairman of the

TESTIMONY IN SENATE
CONTEMPT CASE MAY
BE PRESENTED TWICE
MAY BE GIVEN ONCE BEFORE
JURY AND ONCE WITh
IT EXCLUDED)
JUSTICE RITZTO DECIDE'
Teslimony On Pertinency of Question
Sinclair Refused to Answer
Will Begin Today
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, March 9- Testi-
mony in the Senate contempt case
against Harry F. Sinclair may be
taken twice in the District of Colum-
bia Supreme Court, once with the
jury excluded and again with the jury
present.
After listening to all day argument
on the question of whether the pert-
inency of the questions which the mil-
lionaire oil. operator refused to an-
swer in the Teapot Dome inquiry is
one of law or of fact, Justice Ritz an-
nounced late today that he would be-
gin taking testimony as to pertinency
tomorrow.
The jurors, who are under the prac-
tice here in a misdemeanor case, are
not locked up, would be given a ,hoi-
day while the defense and the gov-
ernment present large sections of the
voluminous record written by the
Senate oil committee.
After considering this evidence,
Justice Ritz will decide whether it
shall go to the jury. If he holds that
the question of pertinency is one for
himself and not the jury to determine,
the evidence under the present rul-
ings will be withheld from the jur-
ors.
In that event the only facts the
jury would have to determine would
be, whether Sinclair was summoned
by the Senate committee, whether he
appeared, whether the questions set
out in the contempt indicment were
asked him, and wheher he refused to
answer them.
Before the lawyers got into their
hours of argument, the government
formally rested its case without call-
ing any additional witnesses, and
George T. Hoover, chief counsel for
the defense, made his opening state-
ment to the jury.
HOPKINS TO TELL
I OF HIS DISCOVERY
B. S. Hopkins, professor of Inor-
ganic Chemistry at the University of
Illinois, will describe his discovery of
Ilinium in a public lecture at 4:15
today in the Chemistry ampitheater,
room 165.
Dr. Hopkins and his coworkers
after several years of work on the'
rare earths, finally identified the ele-
ment number 61 in the periodic table.
The presence of Illinium, which is re-
lated to Radium, was determined by
certain lines in the x-ray spectrum
known to belong to this element, and
by certain new bands in the absorp-
tion spectrum. This element was
named Illinium in honor of the Uni-
versity of Illinois where the work
was done.
Dr. Hopkins has specialized in
work on the rare earths and is the
author of a book entitled "The Chem-
istry of the Rarer Elements.
DRIVE CONTINUES
SHANGHAI, March 9.-The drive of
the Cantonese for the city of Foochow
and the attendant threat on Shanghai
today were overshadowed momentarily
by the possibility of strained relations
between the Peking government and
Moscow growing out of the arrest of
Mlle. Borodin.

SHARES PRAISES
SOF CLOSE' RIVALS

REILEASE OF RUSSIANS
FROM CHINESE PRISON
DEMANDED BY SOVIET
REPRTI S OF O rERS CALLING
FOR EXECUTION OF THE
COURIER: l)ENIE)D

PRESIDENT CI TES
RIOT COMPLAINTS!

S

t

THREE TAKEN AS SPIES
trained Relations Between Peking'
And Moscow Feared When MlIle.,
Borodin Is Arrested

LITTLE TO DRAW UR.
RESOLUTION COVERING
PREVENTION OF ROTS
ACT IESULTS FRO F MEETING
OF UNIVERTSITY AND CITY
OFFICIALS YESTEtDAY
THEATERSCRITICISED
Managers Scored For Attitude Toward
Students And For Indierence
To Police And University
Resolutions aimed to prevent recur-
rence of Monday night's theater riot
will be drafted this morning by Pres-
dent Clarence Cook Little as the re-
suilt of a conference held yesterday at
the City hall, which was attended by
the three Ann Arbor police commis-
Aioners, Mayor Campbell, Joseph AE.
Bursley, dean of students, and Pres-
ident Little. The meeting was called
to discuss the present student "riot-
ing" situation.
The management of the Majestic

Capt. Edw-ard Chambers
The following telegram from thel
Purdue basketball coach and mem-i
bers of his team was received by Thei
Daily last night:I
To Coach E. J. Mather and Captain
Chambers of the Michigan basket-t
ball team:
We are taking this opportunity toF
congratulate you on winning the Con-<
ference basketball championship and
on your clean sportsmanlike playing
in both games with us, which alsoI
characterized the play of the Mich-
igan team throughout the season. The
1927 basketball team is a champion
in every respect and well deserves the{
title.
Coach Ward Lambert and the Purdue
Basketball Team.
NO FUNDS AVAILABLE~
FR RE'E[D ICOMMITTE11:
Headquarters State That Substantial1
Sum Remains For Pennsylvania
Ballot Investlgation
KEYES REFUSES NOUCHER
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, March 9.-The Reed
campaign funds committee hit an-
other snag today when it found the
Senate's tax drawer . tightly locked
against it.
Proposing to proceed with the im-
pounding of baliot boxes in the last
Pennsylvania election, despite failure
of the Senate to act on the resolution
continuing its life during the recess,
the committee learned today that no
funds were avtailable.
.Senator Keyes, Republican, New
Hampshire, chairman of the commit-
tee on audits and control, declined to
sign a voucher permitting further use
of the $55,000 authorized for the com-
mittee. At the committee's head-i
quarters, however, it was stated "a
substantial sum" of the appropria-
tions had not been expended.
Opponents of the bill to continue the
life of the Reed committee took the,
position that the committee is dead7
and it is assumed on this ground that
Senator Keyes refused to act when
David S. Berry, Senate seargeant at
arms, had been given the order of theI
committee directing the impounding of
ballot boxes in the counties of Dela-
ware, Lackawanna, Hillsdale, and Lu-
cerne, asked for funds.
PRINCETON.-At the conclusion of
of a five-day discussion of evolution,I
Dr. Henry Fairfield finally admitted
that it is a subject that is impossible,
to explain.

(By Associated Press)
MOSCOW, March 9- The Soviet
government today renewed its de-
mand on Peking that Mlle. Borodin,
wife of Michael Borodin advisor to
the Cantonese and the three Soviet
couriers arrested Saturday on the So-
viet vessel Pamiat Lenina be re-
leased immediately.
Demand Sent To Mission
The demand was sent to the Chi-?
nese mission in Moscow and was a re-
inforcement of a previous note on the
matter sent to the Peking authorities.
Soviet officials said they recognized
that Chang-Tso-Lin, Manchurian war
lord, who was reported to have order-
ed the execution of the three couriers
as spies, was operating entirely in-
dependently of the existing govern--
ment at Peking and that consequent-
ly there would be some difficulty in
securing the prisoners' release. They
said, however,thatbno matter would'
be neglected to obtain the freedom
of those held.
Government officials said that they
could not believe that Chang-Tso-Lin
would go so far as to order the exe-
cution of the couriers and added that
they were entirely without confirma-
tion of such a report.
Cites Duty of Soviet
It was pointed out that whether
Russian citizens were associated or
not with the Soviet government, the,
Soviet duty was to protect them from
arrest in foreign lands where it was!
their right, with other foreigners, to
move about freely while pursuing
their peaceful vocations. ,
Dispatches from Peking tonight
said that the Soviet embassy in Pe-
king had sent\ a note of protest to'
the Chinese officers there and that the
authorities had telegraphed General
Chang-Tsung Chang, the Shantungese
commander whose troops arrested the
Russians, to send them the facts sur-
rounding the seizure of the Pamiat
L enina.
Execution Order Reported
Chinese sources reported today that
General Chang Tsung Chang had or-
dered the execution of the three cour-
iers and that the executions had been
carried out. Reports that Chang-Tso-
lin had ordered the execution of the
three Russians were denied at the
headquarters of the Ankouchun or Al-
lied Northern armies, where it was
said that Chang Tsung Chang had
full power tp deal with the prison-
ers without asking permission of
Chang-Tso-Lin.
Dispatches from Shanghai said that
the Russians had been arrested after
a quantity of propaganda material
had been found in their baggage
designed to assist the Cantonese who
are now fighting with the northern-
ers. Military plans also were claimed
to have been found. The arrests were
made by white Russians attached to
Chang Tsung Chang's army.
Deny Official Connection
Mlle. Borodin who only recently
was in Shanghai, is the wife of the
Cantonese advisor, whom the Soviet
authorities have denied was offi-
cially connected with the Soviet gov-
ernment. All reports so far have in-
dicated that she was not in the exe-
cution orders which were said to have
been given.

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Clarence Cook Little

CANADA TO PROTEST

and Arcade theaters was crticised at
the meeting for their attitude toward
the students and their indifference
to police and University requests.
Minister In Washington Will Attemypt jPresident Little declared that students
To Settle Issue Of Chicago were so angry with the two theaters
Water Diversion that they had requested him to open
Hill auditorium for the purpose of
SAY LEVELSARE LOWER holding movie shows there until some
agreement could be reached with the
(ysa PsButterfield interests. He intimated
(By Associated Press) that he was not opposed to this plan,
OTTAWA, Ont., March 9-While Meeting T1'o Be Called
Public Works department officialsrde- "The attitude of the theater owners
d cared that diversion of water fromI must be changed before the student'
the Great Lakes by Chicago has "ad- attitude will change," the President
versely affected Canadian harbors and
channels," 0. D Skelton, under-see- declared. An attempt to remedy the
retary of state for external affairs, de- situation will be made at a cqnference
clared that "satisfactory settlement which will be held between University
of this issue would be one of the du-- officials and the Butterfield manage-
ofi thse Cu mionisoter at ment.
Wshigthe'nadan minist a President Little also cited numer-
In a communication to the House ous criticisms which have been pour-
of Commons, Mr. Skelton leclared ing into his office regarding the
"The Government of Canada has means which the police used in quell-
taken every opportunity of commun- ing the mob Monday night. \ It was
icating to the Government of the Unit- charged that officers had fired tear
ed States its views as to the injury gas cartridges directly at students,
done to the levels of the Great Lakes with the result that one man was
and the St. Lawrence River and to burned about the eyes and will prob-
various Canadian interests by the Chi- ably be permanently scarred. Police
cago diversion." Commissioner Joseph Arnet stated in
The statement said that the level reply that the officers were made the
of Lake Huron has been lowered .6 targets of' eggs, stones and harsh
feet, Erie.4 feet and Ontario .4 feet. language and had probaly retaliated
The cost of restoring depths and in a manner exceeding their instruc-
structures of the department, owing tions.
to the reduction of lake surface, said Police Chief O'Brien told the meet-
the department officials has been es- ing that his men had been instructed
timated in 1924 as $2,515,031,. to fire their cartridges into the ground
The Department of Railways and in front of the mob, but in the excite-
Canals issued a statement saying that ment may have neglected to do so.
the St. Lawrence River has been low- As a further means of preventing
ered .4 feet at Prescott, Ont., and .3 future disturbances it was suggested
feet at Lake St. Louis. Montreal har- that all pep meetings hereafter be
bor has been lowered .37 feet. 0ffi- called in the afternoon, Suggestions
cials estimated that, on the opening were also made that the Student coun-
of the new Welland Ship Canal, the [cil be called on the occasion of such
lowering of the Lake Erie level will disturbances to assist in restoring or-
be increased to .7 feet. der by other means than force.
The joint engineering board of. Can- Tear Gas lefended
ada and the United States reported The use of tear gas in dispersing
recently that the water levels of the crowd was defended by Chief
Lakes Michigan, Huron and Erie can O'Brien and Commissioner Arnet as
be restored by compensating works the most humane method possible un-
in the St. Clair and Niagara Rivers! der the circumstances.
at a cost of $3,400,000. The board also Gerald H. Hoag, manager of th Ma-
said that the effect of the authorized jestic, declared yesterday afternoon
diversion on the levels of the St. Law-that as far as he was concerned, he
k rence River at and below Montreal w 'wiling togie fr sscor d
I can be restored by dredging and ac- dents in Hilll auditorium following
I cessory work, at an estimated cost of g
$4,608,000. the winning of Conference champion
slims oron therspecal ccasons

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CABOT WILL TALK
ON MEDICAL CODE

ships or on other special occasions,
provided the Butterfield management
would authorize such action.He sug-
gested the plan of preparing for the
performance in advance with the un-
derstanding that the show would he

Oratorical Association, When Founded About 38 Years Ago,
Had Definite Aim Of Arousing Student Interest In, Debating

Editor's Note: This is the twelfth of alt
series of articles by Daily staff members on the campus in forensic work. Local
various campus institutions and organizations, s in extemporaneous and ora-
published in an effort to make clear their tcot tSd
functions and their particular features of in- torical speeches were inaugurated.
terest to prospective participants. Exteporaneos contest arheld
A 89,Tho both semesters for students eligible
About 38 years ago, in 1889, homas for activities, but who have not yet
C. Trueblood, professor emeritus of taken part in public speaking compe-
public speaking, felt the need for an tition. The University Oratorical Con-
administrative forensic society upon I test, The Atkinson Contest, The Black
the campus with the purpose of New Testament Contest, and the Na-
stimulating intercollegiate debates. tional Intercollegiate Contest on the
Constitution compose the oratorical
And thus was founded the Oratori- events sponsored by this organization.
cal Association with its prime aim The University Oratorical Contest, the

Horace Mann, Wendell Phillips, Henry
Ward Beecher, Winston Spencer
Churchlil, and Presidents Harrison,
McKinley, Cleveland, and Wilson.
SIHowever, this association was dis-
continued in 1912 and the Oratorical
- Association deemed it advisable to
continue to supply the campus withl
! lectures.
In the short period that the Asso-
ciation has been bringing lectures to
the campus many prominent men have
;appeared in An 'Arbor. Amon the
list are Tagore, the famous Indian
poet, and Senator Borah. A consider-
able number of explorers have ap-
peared in Hill auditorium under the
+ auspices of the Association. The Eg-
yptian explorer Weigel, in the
opinion of Prof. R. D. T. -Hollister,

Dean Hugh Cabot of the Medical i free provided ri chigan won, thus of-
School will deliver his annual ad- fering a special inducement to the
dress before all those interested in 1 students. He explained that a free
taking up medicine as a profession at.1 show last Monday night was impos-
4:10 o'clock today in Natural Science ! sible, as the performance must be ar-
auditorium. This will be made at the rIed in adv ance ut by
request of Dean John Effinger of the the Butterfield officials.
literary college. The condition ofHenryBlakely '27;
The address will deal with the re- wh njured b y taegas bomb
quirements for a successful career wonwasnred byte ga vbom
in the field of medicine, and in i sity hosptal last night as unchanged.
Dean Cabot will set forth the various Dr. Albert; C. Kerlikowski, chief resi-
obligations which are encountered in;; dent physician, said that hospital
the profession, as well as its better authysieve sat the ste
known features. The purpose of the w ibe peaenty tie ut
talk will be to encourage all those will be permanently disfigured, but
who are best fitted for being physi- his eyesight will be unimpaired.
clans, and to discourage all those who The one student who was arrested
have illusions concerning such a ca- following the disturbances was re-
reer. The subject has been announc- leased yesterday after being asked to
ed as "Medicine as a Profession." I report to headquarters on the charge
- ;of resisting an officer. There will be
INDIANA DEFEATS prosecution, according to Chief
INDINA EFEAS :O'Brien.
OHIO STATE, 36-31 The formal resolution prepared by
s____President Little and signed by Dean
(By Associated Press) Bursley a'nd Police Commissioners
COLUMBUS, March 9. - Indiana Devine, Arnet and Kyer, will be given
COUBS ac .- Idan I T mD~lV n,, f ;, t~~nxrnnri

i
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of encouraging the interest of the stu-
dent body in debates with neighboring
colleges.
Informal shows were presented by
the Association for the raising of

senior trials for which will be held
this afternoon, leads to the Northern
Oratorical League Contests. The At-
kinsoz Contest is based on the gene-
ral topic of Christ's ideals for the

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