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March 09, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-09

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PAGE FOUL

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

.WEDNESDAY, MARCI 9, 1927

Published eaey morning except Monday
during the Suiverysity yyear by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.1
Members, of Western Conference Editorial
Association. '-
Asoito :*The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
creditedein "-this paper and the local news pub-
lished thereain _
Entered at th. postoffic at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices:eAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY. JR.
Editor .............W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor .............. .Irwin A. Olia
News Editors ........... 1 kIlip c BShi to
Women's Editor..............Marion Kubik
Sports Editor...........Wilton A. Simson
Telegraph Editor..........Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Sta nrd N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
ame Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswick -
Reporter.
Marion Anderson Miles Kimball
Alex Bochnowski Milton Kirshbaum
jean Campbell Richard Kurvink.
Chester E.Clark G. Thomas MeKean
Clarence Edelson Kenneth Patrick
Earl W. De La VergneMorris Quinn
William Emer James Sheehan
Alfred Les roster Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Robert E. Finch Sylvia Stone
Robert Gessner William Thurnau
Elaine Gruber Milford Vanik
Coleman . Glencer Herbert C. Vedder
Harvey 3 Gunderson Marian Welles
Stewart Hooker Thaddeus Wasielewski
Morton B. Icove Sherwood Winslow
ParJ Kern
BVSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD'
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising ........... George i11. Annable, Jr.
rdvertising...........Laurence J. Van Tuyl
Circulation...............T. Kenneth Haven
Publication................Jon H. Bobrink
Aounts................Francis A. ,Norquist
Assistants
George A ray Wachter
MelvinH.1 ABea J B. Wood
D. M. BrQ1 Esther Booze
Florence Coer, Hilda Biner
Daniel Filey Mrrion A. Daiel
Beatrice Greenberg
E. L Hu e Selma M. Jansn
R. AMey Marion Kerr
Harvey Ro blum Marion L. Reading
WiiamT pteancer Harriet C. Smith
Harvey 4Egqitt Nance Solomon
Harold UtIy Florence Widmaler
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1927
Night Ediol -COURTLAND C. SMITH
INDISCREET
Michigan students have again been
regrettably involved in a movie rush
and a subsequent encounter with the
officers of the law. Rather than the
students, ;however, the members of
the local .police force located in the
vicinity of the Arcade theater were
the chief offenders in the disturbance.,
In driving the students and towns-
people from the sidewalks for a block
from the theater, and in chasing them
off the adjacent parts of the campus,
the officers showed considerable in-
discretion and obviously exceeded
their rigts..Their use of night sticks
and tear gas bombs was carried
much farther than was neecessary.
On two occasbns, at least, the glass
cartridges were fired at such close
range and in such a manner that the
faces of students were cut by the
fragments. If employed at all, these
bombs shouljd be used for spreading
the gas rather than as dangerous
projectiles.
It was learned from' the desk
seargent at the police station that

the men had orders only to protect
the theater property and to accost
only those who interfered with the:
business of the theater. If they had,
followed only these instructions, the
crowd would have dispersed much
earlier, and there would have been
no injuries..
The students, of course, were not
entirely blameless for the affair. The
"hoodlum" action of a certain class
on the caipus, which has been ex-
hibited upon previous occasions, was
the fundamental reason for the pres-
ence of the officers. It was the same
spirit which moved some students toj
make the latest rush and which was
responsible for its unfortunate re-
sults.
This, however, does not excuse the
unwarranted action of the police.
Their excessive use of weapons and
their indiscretion should be severely
condemned.
FOR UNIVERSITY NEEDS
To carry on the multifold activities
of the University, the State legislature,
will be asked for appropriations with-
in the, near future, in somewhat theI
same manner that an executive sub-
mits a budget to the board of direc-
tors of a business corporation. These
funds will be utilized to meet currentI
expenses and to widen the Univer-
itv's n1readv wideshere off rvice.

six-tenths of a mill for current opera-
tion and general support, should be
removed. At the present time the
University can receive more than this
sum for current expenses only through
special legislation. The removal of
the limit of $3,700,000 will avoid the
necessity of special appropriations
for this purpose. On the present
equalized value of the State, the mill
tax' proceeds would go from $3,700,-
000 to approximately $4,620,000 an-
nually.
Subject to revision, there will be
nine items taken care of under the
proposed appropriation of $4,925,000.
The first item is $600,000 which will
be used to pay for two stories being
added to the nurses' home, and for
hospital accommodations for certain
special patients now being taKen care
of in Kalamazoo. The second item
of $350,000 will pay for the land on
which the Women's league building
will be constructed. These two are
now past obligations. Next will come
a request for $500,000 to purchase land
for the two proposed dormitories for
women. With this sum will go a fur-
ther request for $750,000 which will
meet one-half the expense of building
the dormitories, the first in the Uni-
versity's future system. .
The fifth item on the list, $1,100,000,
will.provide for additions to the Uni-
versity high school for elemental
school studies. Sixth will come $75,-
000 for the proposed biological sta-
tion on Burt lake. The seventh item
will provide $450,000 for the Observa-
tory at Portage lake. Eighth on the
list is the sum of $200,000 to meet
capital expenses, due to repairs on
the steam and electric lines, a new
boiler in the power house, and the
like. Ninth and last on the appropria-
tions schedule will be the sum of
$900,000 to be used in constructing
the south wing of Angell hall, where
University offices would be tempor-
arily housed. University records now
kept in Old University hall are in no
wise protected fully against fire.
These would be removed to the new
fireproof building.
It is to be hoped that the legis-
lature, will be able to provide for the
University's needs as suggested. The
State legislature has set the standard
for many states in the generous man-
ner in which it has appropriated funds
in the past for University needs. As
far as it is able, it is unlikely that
the legislature will fail to meet the
- I suggested budget. Certainly it has
been most generous in the past.
FOR BRITISH POLICY
Dispatch of the British cruiser, Co-
lombo, to Nicaragua with the ac-
companying statement by the For-
eign Secretary has been regarded in
s England . as a highly significant de-
velopment in British foreign policy.
For some some, Britian . has re-
garded America's elastic interpreta-
tion of the Monroe Doctrine as
rather alarming in view of its
possession of British Honduras in
Central America and British Guiana
in South America. Particular atten-
tion has been given to the statement
by the White House spokesman that
"other governments hesitate to send
forces to Latin Amerca because of our
position on the Monroe Doctrine."
In the recent action taken with at
least the tacit approval of the United
States, then, there has been seen a
restriction on the implications of this
creed. Sir Austen Chamberlain, in
explaining that the cruiser was sent
to Nicaragua merely as a base of
refuge for British citizens, made the

f distinction between that form of pro-
tection and intervention. It was stated
that the vessel would remain only as
long as was necessary for that pur-
pose and that no landing would be
made.
Consideration of this development
as a precedent for British action may
well be welcomed in this country.
With England's right to protect her
citizens in this manner recognized,
her right as well as any possible de-
sire to interfere would be made more
remote, and the strength of Amer-
ica's position on the Monroe Doctrine
will be correspondingly increased.
HUNGARY, ROU1IANIA
At times the League of Nations ac-
complishes something so worthwhile
that it must seriously disconcert the
enemies of that body. When a war is
averted or a dispute settled that in-
volves the welfare of millions of peo-
ple, even those most radical antag-
onists of world brotherhood, and co-
operation must admit that something
has been accomplished.
The present arbitration between!
Hungary and Roumania before the
League tribunal is significant for
these things and many more. It is
signicant because it is the first time
that a German has presided, Foreign
Minister "Stresemann. It is signifi-
cant also because it is peaceful arbi-
tration of a dispute between two na-

T-
POLICE
All)
GENTLE:IEN
LATE BULLETIN
Students were leaving town for
Chicago by the hundreds late last
night. They were going back where
you can walk the streets without
serious interference from the police
force.
SHOT BY SHOT ACCOUNT OF
OF THE RUNNING GUN BATTLE
(The following dispatches were re-
ceived by radio to ROLLS Monday
night, direct from our own privatej
armoured car.)I
Thirty students bravely attemptedj
to get up nerve enough to "rush" the!
Arcade theater after arriving on
campus from the basketball game
where Michigan won the undisputed
championship in basketball for the
first time in history.
It was quite a little tea-party until
the police started shooting off
blanks, over at the Maj. where the
crowd rushed next. Then, like thatI
old Boston tea-party, this turned into
a war.

Music and Drama

THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ
Recital in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The International Night
program in Hill auditorium at 8
, ;Un

i'
r
w
14

dd'

A

GA"AHAAFS
-- BOOKS - BOOKS
EARLY ARRIVALS OF SPRING FICTION
NOW ON DISPLAY
GtAHAeI.S
At Both Ends of the Diagonal

PEACEFUL MONDAY NIGHT
IN DEAR ANN ARBOR TOWN

%'WM TN' slu
wo'r m'O
I~E~f
This exclusive photograph was tak-t
en from our armoured car Monday
night. The policeman is on the right.t
* * *
NOTICE a
ROLLS will donate the fund col-
lected for a stadium bond way bask
there in the fare-tear gas era to the
subsidy of those who can prove that!
they bought eggs Monday night to
fight the gas with. As long as the
fund lasts.
* * *
"We waited until we saw the
whites of their eyes," said Wet Hay.
in a hurried interview on the scene
of carnage, "and they should have
waited until they saw the whites of
our eggs."
* * *
After the blank was shot off by a4
cop, who opened the Maj. door long
enough to do it, the crowd began to
throw eggs. One restaurant reported
sales totaling three dozen.
During the historic Siege of the
Maj. it was noted that cops were
smoking in the lobby. Of course, po-
lice have special privileges, but we1
have our doubts as to whether they
can break state fire laws. Maybe the
fact that they had the doors locked
cancels the other violation of the law.
We didn't get that far in algebra to
find out.
* * *

TONIGHT: The Mimes present'
"It. U. R." in the )limes theater at
8:30 o'clock. * * *
A review, by Philip C. Brooks.
The Mimes have chosen a vehicle
for their current performance which
certainly carries with it a world of
interest in speculation-meditation of
an almost inconceivably imaginative
sort. The strange workings of the
mind that produced "R.U.R." produced
a novelty which is not only pleasing
but well worthwhile as a philosophical
study and satire on modern industrial-
ism.
What a remarkable pastime Capek
has suggested in wondering what
would be the result of the abolition of
human labor, the wiping out of value
and the money which expresses it!
How pertinent is this suggestion in
our times! Surely the most astute
economist, the most academic his-
torian, the scholar in any field, would
find an appeal in this creation.
In selecting this play, the Mimes set
about a task of unusual difficulty.
For the fascinating thought of "R. U.
R." is expressed in melodrama--not
brief spasms of it, but a whole ex-
tended scene and more. To present it
without the lack of- smoothness which
would detract from one's interest in
the play itself, is indeed a credit to
the players.
The man who had the duty of car-
rying the ultra-melodrama, and who
maintained the excellent interpreta-
tion of character throughout, Charles
Livingstone, is to be highly congrat-
ulated on his work. There is a simi-
larity between his part in this and
that of "The Last Warning," but it is
obvious that his work here, in keep-
ing with the play itself, is on a much
higher plane. The meticulous book-
keeper, Roy Curtis, as well as William
Ramsay, Francis Kleutgen, and Theo-
dore Skinner, also deserve commen-
dation.
It is unfortunate that the Mimes
is not, apparently, able to pick a more
convincing looking lady, and one who
cannot show a better feminine char-
acter. There are available men who
could give a better appearance to the
lead in this play, and while Lewis'
acting was passable, it is far from
unsurpassable. Richard Woellhaf,
who hardly had an opportunity to do
much acting in "R.U.R.", has made
much more appealing performances as
a lady.

U

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Corona Portable
at Riders Pen Shop
Easy Terms

I

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FIRST, SECOND.CABIN.TOURISTS THIRD ESPECIALLY
Phone 6412 or write 601 E Huron Street
E. G. K EBLERI Steamship Agent. ANN ARBOR

-----------------------------------------------------------

II

Have You a Date Tonight?
If so, of course' you will want to come to
Granger's and dance from eight to ten. Music
by Jack Scott's Wolverines-just as for the week-
end dances.
You will have a big time, and since the dance
only lasts two hours, it will not interfere with
your school work.
GRANGER'S ACADEMY
Dancing Wednesday, Friday, Saturday.

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III

I

.

IN THE BATTLE ZONE

"Well, Harvard and the De-
troit high school boys ain't got
nothing on us, now," remarked j
the Jolly Junior Monday night.
L
* * *
Police at a late hour last night
seemed undetermined as to whether
they had arrested anyone or not. Ac-
cording to the Times News, one stu-
dent was arrested on a charge ofsre-
sisting officers but police denied
that they had made any arrests.
Clippy Stadium at last proved its
usefulness. Not only did it serve as
a grandstand for the comedy in front
of the Arc, but it later became a re-
treat for students. Police raided Clip-
py Stadium more times than students
even tried to rush the theaters.
ROLLS will post a notice tomorrow
prohibiting officers from trespassing
on the Stadium property.
Graduate students were especially
hard hit in the riot. One was ar-
rested and one or two graduates were
injured. It seems as if the students
were the only ones that got off easily.
Some expressed the opinion that
they would rather be shot in the leg
by real bullets than get gun-powder
wounds and glass in the cheek.
While police ran up one side of the
street chasing everybody in front of
them with tear gas and fists, the
crowd crossed over to the other and
went back again. Then the cops
would have to make a rush back
again. It was one of these sheep
chase goats affairs.
One policeman was shot by his
own tear-gas in the State street run-
ning gun battle. He went into Cal-
kins-Fletcher drug for first aid just!
after one of the student victims came
in.
A c n ~^n ofu ^f lip ie^ i o n n n af L c '^^

31ASQUES' ELECTIONS
The following tryouts have been
elected to Masques' women's dramatic
society: Vivian Bullock, Elizabeth
Corn, Elizabeth De Vol, Lorta Erding,
Doris Foster, Nellie Hoover, Anne
Elizabeth Jacobs, Pauline Jacobs,
Katherine Kelley, Marjorie Lewis,
Ruth Long, Lorinda McAndrew, Eliza-
beth McCurdy.
* * *
THE STUDENTS' RECITAL
On. Thursday evening, March 10, at
S o'clock, a recital will be given in
the School of Music auditorium by
Virginia Tice, pianist; Helen Hays,
violinist; R. Newton Detzer, baritone;
Cecelia Fine, pianist; Dorothy Wilson,I
soprano; and Mary Alice Case, violin-
ist. * *
THE ORGAN RECITAL PROGRAM
Palmer Christian will present the fol-
lowing numbers in the regular Twi-
light Organ Recital program this aft-
ernoon. at 4:15 o'clock in hill audi-
torium:
Prelude and Fugue in E minor.. Bach
Concerto in D .........Vivaldi-Bach
Largo
Allegro
Prelude....................Schmitt
Choral and Improvisation on
"Indulci Jubilee".......Karg-Elert
Angel Scene from "Hansel and
Gretel"............. Humperdinck
The Fountain from "A Chinese
Garden" ..............DeLamarter
Traumerei..................Strauss
Passacaglia and Finale on
BACH............Georg Schumann
Mr. Christian has recently returned
from a concert tour which has in-
cluded cities in the west and middle-
west, as well as a recital before the
National Music Teachers' Convention
in Dallas, Texas. He will resume the
Organ Recitals on Wednesday after-
noon until further notice.

"And Michigan Rules the West"
Again the team has triumphed and another
Conference championship has been won. For
over twenty years we have watched the pres-

tige

and glory of Michigan advance to the

envied position it now commands. And

we

take pride in the fact that during these years
we have had the pleasure of serving the
students of Michigan.
Phone 4219
~UNDRy Co-

E

They ought to use laughing gas."
As we go to press rumors are afloat
that the theaters were to be closed
last night after 8:30. If so, we hope
the boys all have sense enough to

I 13, siege of the stores on Mate street

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