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March 06, 1927 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-06

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ESTABLISHED

Jr

gilt

att

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XX2VII. No. 111

TEN PAGES

ANN ARDOR. MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 1927

TEN PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ERI

ES

SSURED,

OF

TITLE

6RAPPLERS
DE EATED
BIG TEN TI

ARE
FOR
T L.E

ILLINOIS TEAM IS VICTORIOUS
OVER WOLVERINES BY
SINGLE MATCH.
ALL BOUTSARE CLOSE
Baker, Just Out Of Iospitai, Loses To
Opponcht In First Setback
Of Conference Career l
(Special to The Daily)I
CHAMPAIGN, March 5.-Michigan's
initial bid for a Conference wrestling
title fell three points short of its
mark when the strong Illinois team
successfully defended its Big Ten title
and increased its string of consecutive
championships to four by defeating
the Wolverines here yesterday after-
noon in one of the most closely con-
tested meets ever held in the Illini
gymnasium, 12 to 9.
Thacker, Illini 115 pounder, unex-
pectedly defeated Baker, Michigan
veteran, in the first bout of the meet
to give his team a three point marin.
Baker was forced to wrestle the final
bout of his Varsity career under a
serious handicap, as he was confined
to the hospital for the greater part of
the week with a hip injury.
The Wolverine star left the hospital
shortly before the team boarded the
train for Champaign and gamely took
the mat against Thacker. The handi-
cap proved too great, however, and
Baker suffered the first defeat of his
Conference career by losing to the
unbeaten Illini wrestler by a decision.
Soloiona Defeats 7esher
Coach irehn's team lost its three
point advantage when Solomon, Wol-
verine 125 pounder, decisively out
fought Hesmer to gain a decision with
an advantage of fiVe minutes. Hes-
meti, rated as one of the leading 125
pounders in the western section of
the Big Ten, proved no match for the!
clever Michigan grappler, who won
his fourth consecutive Big Ten vic-
tory of the season.
The invaders went into the scoring
lead when Watson, light weight star
gained a decision oyer Minot in over-
time periods with an Advantage of a
minute and a half. The men wrestled
defensively in the regular 10 minute
period, each seeking to find an open-
ing, but in the overtime periods the
Michigan wrestler succeeded in gain- I
ing a sufficient advantage to win a
decision.
By defeating Gunlock, Illinois 145
pounder, Sauer gained his team's
third straight victory and increased
Michigan's lead to 6 points. Sauer
too strong for his opponent, although
Gunlock held a decided advantage in
size and gained the decision with a
margin of nerly three minutes.
I)onahoe Is Defeated
Another Michigan veteran met an
uiiexpected defeat when Captain Don-
ahoe, Big Ten 158 pound title hold-
er, lost his first Conference match to
Geis, 1926 captain of the Illini, who
sustained his first Conference defeat
at the hands of Beers of Iowa last
Saturday. Going into the fifth match.
of the meet a slight favorite over the
veteran Ges, Donahoe lost by a de-
cision, when the Illinois 158 pounder
gained a time advantage of nearly 5
minutes.
Ritz Defeats Wolverine
The 175 pound bout proved to be
one of the feature performances of
the meet and went into overtime per-
iods before Ritz managed to gain a
decision over Rich, Wolverine veteran.
With the outcome of the meet at stake
the men wrestled cautiously for the
regular 10 minute period, neither
gaining an advantage. In the overtime
periods, however, Ritz managed to go
behind the Michigan man to gain a
three minute advantage.
With the score tied at nine all. Cap-
tain Shively, Illini veteran, and Pres-
cott, Wolverine heavyweight, took the
nat in the final bout of the meet. The
all-American football star, proved too
experienced for the Michigan entrant
and won the deciding three points of

the meet by gaining a decision.
Shively's advantage was eight
minutes.

RADIO COMMISSION
AIDED BY HOOVER
(By Associated Press)
WASH INGTON, March 5-Regula-
ti()n for radio under the federal com-
mission was brought closer to ac-
tuality today, when Preisdent Cool-
idge gave recess appointment to the
two members needed to ' complete
such a board, and Secretary Hoover
invited all five of the new commis-
sioners to come to Washington.
While Congress enacted a law to set
up a commission of five with power
to control radio broadcasting, appro-
priations to sustain it failed in the
filibuster jam that locked the closing
hours of the session.
Orestes H. Caldwell, of New York,
and Henry A. Bellows of Minnesota,
two of the five men named to the
committion, failed to obtain Senate
confirmation before adjournment, but
received today recess appointment
from the President. The lack of funds,
Commerce department officials said,
would greatly hamper the commis-
sion, but Secretary Hoover indicated
that he would do his best to help it
out.
MM FODWILL TALK
UPON ARCHITECTURE~
Noted Architectural Critic Will GIV
Four Lectures This Week AboutI
Modern ,fyscrapers
IS AUTHOR OF BOOKS
Lewis Mumford, one of the most
widely known critics in the field of
architecture, will give a series of
three lectures under the auspices of
the architectural college beginning to-
morrow afternioon' at 4:15 o'clock in
the West gallery of Alumni Memorial
Hall.
Tomorrow, Mr. Mumford will give
one of three lectures: "The Sky-
scraper", "The City: Past, Present
and Future in America" or "The Ro-
mantic and-Utilitarian Movements in
American Architecture."
Mr. Mumford has written on social
problems and architecture. His first
book, "Story of Utopias," was follow-
ed by "Sticks and Stones," a treatise
on architecture which brought its au-
thor into considerable prominence in
the field of art. Mr. Mumford has also
written a number of articles called
"The Golden Age," which deals with
the subject of architecture, and which
appeared in the New Republic.
Mumford criticizes the mechanical
elements of modern life. He sponsors
the garden city movement, consider-
ing the present day tendencies of
American cities to be machine-like.
Mr. Mumford will give a lecture:
"The City of the Future," at the
School of Religion on Wednesday, as
well as the three lectures given in
the College of Architecture. These
lectures will be open to the public.
ADVANCE SALE IS
LARGE FOR CAPEK
PLA Y PRODUCTION
"R. U. R.," a play by Karel Capek,
will open tomorrow night in the
Mimes theater with the largest ad-
vance seat sale in the history of the
organization. Yesterday only a few
tickets remained, and sell-outs for all
of the performances are anticipated
by officers of Mimes.
The play itself, which is a fantasy
using for its characters automatons,
1 is one of the most difficult ever at-
tempted by Mimes, according to crit-
ics, and the presentation here will be
the first made by amateurs and one of
the first given outside of New York.
It will be given every night this week,
beginning tomorrow and ending Sat-
urday, and more than 40 students are

used in the cast.
The production has necessitated the
installation of more electrical equip-
ment than is used in the opera. .A
large number of the effects of the'
production depend upon the electrical
equipment for their execution. A
thunder sheet has been installed to
produce the effect of explosions in the
nearby mills, cannons, rifles, a wind
machine, the first ever used in the
Mimes theater, and a large number
of revolvers have all been secured
for the presentation.
The play itself, revolves around a
small gro'ip of human beings left on
tha Faor+h whn ennetrnct a numbeof

SCOTT NEAR/Nf WILL
SPEAK ON CARIBBEAN
'DOLLAR DIPLOMACY'I

HURDLE RULINGS
ARE LESS SEVERE
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, March 5----Tlme gunl
jumping si):inter and tile tripping
timber topper will he dealt with less
severely henceforth by the Intercol-
legiate A. A. A. A. under rule changes
adopted at the annual neeting of the

DETROIT HIGH

SCHOOL

WINS SWIMMING MEE"T

FORMER
AND

COLLEGE PROFESSOR
NOTED ECONOMIST
IS SOCIALIST

a;

association todlay.
Increasing the weight of its hurdles' TII)DEN ITCH OF CHICAGO'

I

AND SCORES 13 POINTS

CHICAGO IS DEFEATED;

THOMAS TO TALK ALSO
Director Of The League For Industrial
Democracy Will Discuss Various
Phases Of Capitalism
Scott Nearing, noted economist and
socialist leader, will lecture on "Dol-
lar Diplomacy in the Caribbean" at
4:15 o'clock tomorrow in the Natural
Science auditorium. The lecture, which
is being given under the auspices of
the Round Table club, is one of a
series of talks the socialist, formerly
a college professor and now an in-
dependent lecturer, is giving through-
out the country under the League
for Industrial Democracy.
Mr. Nearing first gained' fame as
an economics teacher in the Wharton
School of Business at the University
of Pennsylvania. Later the economist
ias a member of the faculty of the
Rand School of Social Science, and
Columbia University, New York. He
has taken an important part in the de-
velopment of the present day sociol-
ogy and economics, and although de-
voting most of his time to lecturing;

from 16 to 24 pound(s, thmo association
abolished a rule calling for the dis-
qualification of athletes who kick4
over three or more of the barriers in
their flight. In the future, hurdlers
will be able to flaten out every stand-
ard in the route without fear of pun-
ishment.'
Officials contend that faulty hurd-
ling is in itself suffiient penalty, ha-
ing a tendency to throw the contend-
ents out of stride. By the same reason-
ing the association voted to abolish
the one yard penalty for one false
hurdle start.
ALUMNI SECRETARIES
MAKE REUNION PAN
Consider Organization Of Classes For
Purpose Of Cooperation With
Central Association
OFFICERS ARE ELECTED
In answer to a call issued by Presi,
!dr1.Lf Vl., i -n Cnn k T 7Lit, 7 lJi

I LAND F ARK A E
TIED FOR SECOND

.nsca .betisnwo tef- ent Carence ao tk re, caarumn
ontsocial shubjets, inow on the fa- secretaries, representing approximate-
culty of the New School for Social Iy
Research of New York. 'ly 27,00;0 graduates of the University, I
. I e--f . n c 1- iTT- , yx al- uuy ui-mnrn'n''

Much of the socialist's time of late
has been devoted to writing, and Mr.
Nearing is the author of many books
on economics and sociology, one of
which, "Dollar Diplomacy" is partic-1
ularly revel nt to the subject which
he will discuss tomorrow afternoon.
Following his appearance here, Mr.
Nearing will deliver a series of four.
lectures in Detroit sponsored by the
Worker's Educational association. To-
day he is appearing before the De-
troit Open Forum, in Cass Technicall
high school, discussing "Dollar Di-!
plomacy in Mexico and Nicaragua."j
Thomas To Speak Tuesday
Norman Thomas, director of the
League for Industrial Democracy, will
give the second of the two lecture
series, appearing at 4:15 Tusday in
Natural Science auditorium, to dis-
cuss "Industrial Democracy". The
league, of which Mr, Thomas is the
director, has membership in all parts
of the country, and has its headquar-
ters in New York.
Branches of the League for Indus-
trial Democracy have been establish-
ed in 100 schools and colleges in this
country. Included in the membershp
of the organization are socialists,
communists, liberal capitalists , and
others. With the combined member-
ship of students and social workers
in the business world, the league is
one of the largest bodies of its kind
in the country.
Will Address Sociology Classes
Mr. Thomas has been invited to ad-
dress University,.classes in economics
and sociology, and will devote all of
Wedneday to student lectures. Like
Mr. Nearing, Mr. Thomas is the au-
thor of various books on economics
and sociology, and just recently edit-
ed "Newer Defenses of Capitalism."
Other books edited by the league head
are well known for his views on so-
cial aspects.
In Order to defray expenses, the
Round Table club will charge a nom-
Iinal admission fee of 25 cents for both
lectures.
DRIVE BEGINS TO
OBTAIN MICHIGAN
QUOTA FOR CAMPS
The campaign to enroll Michigan's
quota for the Citizens' Military Train-
ing corps at Camp Custer and Fort
Brady is now in progress. A pan-
state drjve of 60 days is being made
for the enlarged quota of 1878 for this
year. Heretofore Michigan has never
obtained its full quota, of students for
the training camps.
Every Michigan young man between
the ages of 17 and 24, of good moral
and physical character, will be given
an opportunity to enlist. Those who
qualify will be given 30 days' train-
iny with nn avnpnaP for railroad fare.

Imet at the Union yesterday morning
to discuss plans for an organization
of classes to co-operate with tie!
Alumni association.
During the morning session, the|
meeting was addressed by Mason P.
Rumney, '08E, Detroit, who is past-l
president of the association; Wilfred
Shaw, '04, editor of the "Alumnus"
and general secretary of the associa-
tion; T. Hawley Tapping, '16L, field
secretary; and by E. J. Ottaway, '94,
Port Huron, who outlined plans for a
10 year program which is to culmi-
nate in a general reunion of all classes
in 1937, at the time of the centennial f
I celebration of the founding of the Uni-
versity.
President Clarence Cook Little ad-
dressed the secretaries at their lunch-
eon in the Union, outlining the needs
of the University. Several members 1
of the faculty discussed specific
phases of this need. In the afternoon
session plans were further outlined
for a closer bond between the classes
and the Alumni association and of-
ficers were elected.. Gordon Kings-
bury, '11, Detroit, was elected chair-
man of the executive council; Dr. G.
Carl Huber, '87M, Ann Arbor, vice-
chairman; Joseph H. Primeau, '10L'
Detroit, secretary - treasurer. The
other members of the council are Lee
A. White, '10, Detroit; Miss Dorothy
Roehm, '15, Detroit; T. Hawley Tap~-
ping, '16L, Ann Arbor; and Wilfred
Shaw, '04, Ann Arbor.
SHIP BURNS BUT
40 ARE RESCUED
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, March 5.-A new story
of heroism was added to the annals
of the sea in the rescue of the crew
of 40 from the fire-swept Spanish
freighter Cabo Hatteras, 150 miles off
New York.
The Cabo Torres, sister ship of the
doomed vessel, emerged unheralded
from the blackness of the night to
range itself alongside the burning ship
when the nearest aid was believed
miles away.
How Capt. Zalvidea and his crew
} were picked up from thmeir storml-toss-
ed lifeboats after they had abandon-
ed their ship was tersely told in a
tjradio message.
rhe Cabo Torres stood by the burn-
ing ship through the night in hope of
salvaging her today.
: "

FIVE RECORDS BROKEN
Northwester Medley Team Lowers
Old mark In Exceptional
' Performance Of (lay
Capturing live firsts, and placing in
every other event, Northwestern High
school of Detroit completely domi-
nated the third annual Michigan In-
terscholastic swimming meet held
yesterday afternoon in the Union pool.
The team from Detroit compiled
45 1-2 points during the afternoon,
and were never pressed either by
Tilden Tech, of Chicago, or Highland
Park, which were tied for second place
with 17 points.
Five Michigan Interscholastic rec-
ords were broken, and Northwestern
was the cause of three of the new
marks. Record times were establish-
ed in the 100 yard breast stroke, the
50 yard free style, 100 yard back
stroke, 100 yard free style, and the
medley relay.
Lane Tech of Chicago was fourth
and Oak Park fifth, but neither team
at any time figured in the running.
The 200 yard relay was won by
Northwestern without any trouble.
The team had everything their own
way in the preliminaries and repeat-,
ed their victory in the finals in the
fast time of 1:48 2-5.
Breaks Breast Stroke Record
The first record of the afternoon to
be broken was the 100 yard breasti
stroke. Abbott of Morton, Chicago,I
trailed Wunsch of Northern until the
final lap, when he unloosed a burst of
speed to finish in front in the remark-
able time of 1:15 3-5, breaking the'old
record by four and one-fifth seconds.
In the 50 yard free style prelimin-
aries Craig of Northwestern swam-'the
distance in 25 2-5 seconds, thus estab-
lishing a new record ,for the event.
In the finals Craig was again the
winner, but failed to equal his time
of the morning.
The feature race of the afternoon,
the 200 yard free style, Durr of North-
western barely beat out Ericsson of.
Tilden by a scant few inches, and was
declared the winner in 2:361-5. Col-
bath of Lane was third and Klin-
worth of Highland Park fourth.
The fancy diving contest brought
together the best collection of prep
divers ever seen in the Union pool.
The event was won by Colbath of
Lane with a score of 87.65. points.
Oxley of Northwestern was second,
Hackett of the same school third, and
Wilkie of Highland Park fourth. 1
The spectators were treated to
many exceptional dives by all per-
formers, and especially by Colbath,
who is'a younger brother of Wally
Colbath, the diver of the Northwest-
ern university swimming squad.
The third record breaking swim of
the meet was the ,100 yard back stroke,
won by Tucker of Oak Park. He
swam the distance in 1:08 4-5, break-
ing the former record by two full
(seconds. Close behind him was Boldt
of Northwestern, and Carruthers and
Meigs of Highland Park.
Craig Wins Free Style Event
Craig also broke the 100 yard free
style mark in the preliminaries, low-
ering the old record of 59 3-5 seconds
to 58 3-5 seconds. In the finals he
{ again failed to equal his mark of the
morning, but won the event 'in 59 2-5
seconds, only a few yards ahead of
his teammate, Walker. Stapleton of
Tilden was third, and Snyder of
Northwestern was fourth.
In the final event on the program
the Northwestern medley squad com-
pleted the record breaking perform-
ances of the day by lowering the old
mark of 2:41 3-5 by three and three-
fifths seconds.
j IICHIGAN DEFEATS BADGERS
IN EXCITING HOCKEY GA ME

Benny Oosterbaan
Michigan forward, who scored 13
points in the game with the Maroons
last ,night at Chicago, and took the
lead in Individual scoring honors,
making his total 110 points, three
points ahead of Hunt, Ohio State

IARR.IGAN MAKES EIGHT POINTS
TO TIE Z[IERMAN, CHICAGO,
FOR SECON)D IIONORS
SHOW STRONG ATTACK
Wolverine Offensive Combination Has
Same Deadly Precision That
Featured Purdue Game
(By Smith 1. Cady, Jr.)
CHICAGO, March 5 -Michigan as-
sured itself of at least a tie for the
Western Conference basketball cham-
pionship by riding rough shod over
the University of Chicago five here
tonight, winning by a score of 34 to 15
before a capacity crowd in Bartlett
gymlnas iumi.#
By defeating the Maroons, the Wol-
verines increased their string of vic-
tories to nine games, which gives
them a lead of one game over the In-
diana five, which has won eight
games' but has been defeated three
times. Purdue, the other contender
still reinaining in the race, has lost
only three games, and has won but
seven. Michigan's claim to an undis-
puted title can come about by the
defeat of Iowa in Ann Arbor Monday
or by Ohio defeating 11ndiana and
either Northwestern or Chicago de-
feating Purdue.
Close Guarding Features Game
In accordance with early predic-
tions, the game was featured by close
guarding. Michigan's defense was
practically air-tight, the Maroons be-
ing forced to resort to a long range
attack for their scores. In the first
half of the ganme, Chicago was held to
two baskets and one free throw, while
Michigan amassed a 15 point total.
Oosterbaan scored a total of 13
points, giving him high scoring hon-
ors of the game and also the lead in
the Big Ten scoring for the season.
The tall Wolverine forward displayed
his usual brilliant power by sinking
six baskets on rebounds off the back-
board. By making 13 points, Ooster-
baan increased his .total to 110,
which placed him first in the indivi-
dual standing, three points ahead of
hunt of Ohio State, who counted 16
points in the game with Iowa tonight.
Harrigan, the main cog in the Wol-
verine offense, scored three baskets
and two free throws, giving him a tie
for second scoring honors in the game
with Zimmerman of Chicago, who
sank four baskets from the floor.
These eight points place Harrigan
fourth in the Big Ten individual scor-
ing standing.
Have Strong Attack
Michigan displayed, an attack
against the Maroons which equalled
that shown in the Purdue game in
Ann Arbor Monday. The offensive
comi6ination centering its attacks
about Harrigan, worked smoothly,
especially taking the ball down under
the basket. When the Wolverines had
possession of the ball .near the goal,
Oosterbaan brought in his deadly
short shots which clinched the game.
The especially prepared defense of
the Chicago team might have proven
impregnable to the offense of other
Conference teams, but could not cope

star, who
game with

counted 16
Iowa.

points in the

BOARD PICKS FIRM TO
F[INISH STADIUM WORK
2llnneapolis Company I Selected For
Completion Of -tructure; Must
Be Done By Oct. 1
CHOICE PLEASES YOST
James Lock and Company, builders
of Minneapolis, Minn., was selected
to complete the work on Michigan's
new million dollar stadium by thel
Board in Control of Athletics at a
special meeting held yesterday after-
noon at the Union.
The contract to the Lock concern
calls for completion by Oct. 1, 1927.
The work of constructing the seating
I deck, concourse, tunnels, team rooms,
toilet facilities, and press strand,j
along with such minor features as
will complete the stadium for next
fall, will be done by the Lock com-
pany.
Numerous bids have been consider-
ed for the past week by a special coin-
mittee known as the building commit-
tee with the present selection the re-
sult of their survey. The successful
bidder has been prominently identi-
fied with many mid-western construc-
tion jobs. The University of Minne-
sota football stadium at Minneapolis
was built by the James Lock com-
pany.
Speaking for the building commit-
tee of the Board in Control of Ath-
letics, Fielding H. Yost, director of
intercollegiate athletics, expressed
himself as pleased with the selection
of this bidder and stated that he felt
certain that the project would be
ready for use on time for the opening
game with Ohio Wesleyan.
FACULTY TO PICK
CONTESTORATORS
Preliminaries for the University
Oratorical contest will start Tuesday,
when the two junior representatives
swill be chosen. The elimination of
the junior contestants will be held at
4 o'clock in room 3209 Angell hall.
The contest will be judged by mem-

I.
_I
_
I
1
_,
-)
f
1
i
f,
r
Y
a
y
.
5
f
t
L.
-

with Coach Mather's five.
Summaries:
MICHIGAN (31)
Oosterbaan, rf.........
Harrigan rf.............
McCoy, c .............. .
Chambers, rg..........
Petrie, lg..............
Martini, if.............
Rasnick, if............
Schroeder, rg. . ......

Truskowsky,'Ig
Totals .......
CHICAGO (15)
Gist, rf........
Farwell, if ......
Sackett, 1-......
Hoerger, rg ....
McDonough, Ig
Zimmerman, if

... ...,

FG FT
6 1
3 2
2 2
2 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
13 8
FG FT
1 0
0 0
1 0
0 2
0 1
4 0
6 3.

Pts.
13
8
6
7
0
0
0
0
0
34
Pts.
L
0
2
2
1
8
15

i

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Totals . .........

W.
MICHIGAN 9
Indiana..........8
Purdue ..........7
Wisconsin........7

L.
4

Pet.
.819
.728
.700
.637

Harvard Takes Meet
SFrom Stellar Field

II

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