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March 01, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-01

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Ir

Air
.A-Ah.,
Ar\m
%ww t

MEMBER
ASSOCIATE
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 106

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARB>OR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

WILL TAKE LEAD

I - - -Mmmm

D O H E N Y L O S ES B A T T LE[OCIL H S V E L A S
FOR CONFRMIO~lN O
OL RESRV LAE

CIRCUIT COURT DECISI ON
UPHELD BY SUPREME
COURT JUDGES

IS!

Michigan Technic, Established In 1882, [][ R
Ranks As Oldest Publication On Cam pusQVT
Editors Note: lis k the four th of a studlents and facult y memb~ers, mnet "T'nlE ,A'L'TA
series of articles by Daily staff members on TteodAcgA
various campus institutions and organiztoons, !from timie to time to d.IsCuss engineer- i
published in an effort to snake Fear their
fvrou ns and their particular features of in- ins problems and to listen to technical
terest t) prosepetive participants. papers treat which were a
Established in 1882, the Michigan by authorities. A report of these
Technic, official publication of the en- papers and of the transactions of the CJJARgLES R ENN EPA
gineering college, takes its place as society were recorded aid published WITH iMARGAIR
the oldest publication on the campus. annually in a bound booklet about six COI1P14ISE C0
Not a few of the first of these years by nine inches, called "Selected
were strenuously spent by the editors Papers Read Before the Engineering J3 FAhOUS PL
who were in charge of the magazine, Society." This was the beginning of
wondering what they could do to pre- the present day "Michigan Technic." "MI )II f4ded MiIlIrool
vent their infant publication from be- Three booklets, containing the re- t heret N 'Teai
coining defunct and it was only after ports of 10 papers, were published im
a long fight that the Technic was put the three succeeding years, after 1II; tro(
on a firm basis. I which followed a lapse of three years. «
In 1881, when the department of en-1 The next issue was in 1888, and it was "The Salutation," a
gineering was still a part of the Col- at this time that the name of "Technic" ban Kennedy will b
lege of Literature, Science, and the was assumed. It was not until 1903 in Hill auditorium by
Arts, a group called the Engineering that the name was changed to the on the annual Oratoric
society was formed. The group, which "Michigan Technic." lfs program. The comp
was composed of all the engineering (Contined on Page Eight) i -U_ _

GOVERNMENTIS VICTOR
Expenditure of $10,(W,(O4t Is Marked
By Fraud And Corruption In
JiUdeny Transactions
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28-Edward L.i
Doheny lost today in his fight to have
the court confirm the leases to the Elkj
Hill, California, naval oil reserve
awarded to him by Albert D. Fall as
Secretary of the Interior.
Upholding the finding of the Circuit
Court, the Supreme court in an unan-
imous decision, held that these leases

PRESENTI
TION' ON
PROGRAm
Y ANT) WIFE
1ET (-AGE
01IPANY
AYWRIGHT
k School of Arts
'r Technique
duced
play by Charles
e given tonight
,y the Kennedys
cal lectures ser-
any will include

J:~.:::~~::.::: *i~ ~~*~ - f I ________________________________________________________ _______________

PHYSICIST WILL TALK
r% ii muiir a~'~U3s r i4'tfu

IN PLAY TONIGHTW
CONFERENCE 1"TIE AS PURDUE
'IS DEFEATED BY 42P-2O SCORE

not only were illegal but were obtain-
ed by "fraud and corruption."
The victory was sweeping for the
government, confirming in every de-
tail the position taken by special coun-
rel appointed after a Senate commit-
tee had completed an investigation of
the naval oil reserve.
The opinion delivered by Justice
Hupler held that it was the establish-
ed policy of/Congress and of the gov-
ernment to maintain the reserved field
supply of the navy under ground un-
der the general leasing act of 1920 car-
ried no authority for leasing the naval
oil reserves.
The court sustained the Circuit
court in California in cancelling the
leases and contracts and referred Do-
heny to Congress for any relief he
may feel he is entitled to forthe ex-
penditure of more than $10,00,0,000 for
the erection of storage tanks at Pearl
Harbor,fuHawai, under his contract,
and for fuel oil ilaced in them, as well
as for improvement work upon the
reserve.
throughout the decision the court
referred by way of emphasis to the
fraud and corruption marking the
transactions, although a jury in the
District of Columbia Supreme court
last December held that there was
nothing criminal in the relations be-
tween Fall and Doheny.es
The ruling todayyof the court that
the leasing -act did not warrant the
leasing of naval oil reserve was taken
by court attendants as forecastig a
decisioi In the Harry F. Sinclair Tea-
pot Dome Naval Oil Reserve case, sus-
taining the circuit court in cancelling
the lease and contract.' The Sinclair
case, of which a review recently was
granted, was today advanced for hear-
ing on April 11 and it was freely pre-
dictedthat when that case reached the
court for decision, it will be disposed
of upon the authority of the Doheny
case, holding the lease and contarct
invalid.
World's Record Is
Shattered By Hahn
(By Associated Press)
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, N.
Y., Feb. 28.-Lloyd Hahn, sturdy Bos-
ton A. A. runner, shattered the
world's indoor 1000-yard record to-
night when he raced to victory over
the defending champion Ray Dodge,
if the Illinois A. C., in the title event
at this distance in the National A. A.
U. Indoor Track and Field champion-
ship.
His time was 2 minutes, 12 4-5 sec-
onds, 3-5 second faster than the for-
mer mark set by Joie Rae in 1919 at
Brooklyn and equalled by Hal Cut-
bill, the "flying parson" at Buffalo in
1922.
Hahn set a sizzling pace from the
crack of the gun and won "going
away" by 10 yards from Dodge, with
the rest of a field of 20 original start-
ers either forced out or strung far
in the rear.
Edsin Wide, famous Swedish dis-
tance runner, was unable to overcome
liberal handicaps conceded to a field
of 10 rivals in a 1500 meter exhibition
race and barely gained fifth place, 40
yards behind the winner, Brennan of
Fordham university, who had a 100-
yard margin at the start.
Wide's time was 4 minutes, 2 2-5
seconds, as compared with the world's
indoor record of 3 minutes and 56
seconds set by Paavo Nurmi here in
1925. Brennan's time was 3 minutes,
56 4-5 seconds.
Move To Seat Gould
In Senate Is Upheld

UN WAVEMLUMANUSI
- Professor Schoedinger Of Iniversity
Of Zurich To Lecture Here
On His Discoveries

!!
3I
E
r

Charles ann Xennedy, Mrs. KennedyI
(formerly Edith Wynne Mathison),
and Margaret Gage, a younger actress
vho has been trained by the Ken-
ncdys'
Mr. Kennedy ;s one of the better
Wknown of modern playwrights, having,
written, among others, "The Admiral,"
"Old Nobody," and "The Chastening."
Students Of Eleven Foreign tions j All of these plays contain small casts
To Participate in Annual Affair and are particularly adaptable to pres-
Of Cosmopolitan Club entation by repertory companies. The
Kennedys have been engaged in reper-

Charles annK ennedy;
Who will appear tonight in Hill au-
ditorium. Mr. Kennedy, with his wifeI
and Margaret Gage, will present one
of his plays, "The Salutation," taking
the lead himself.{
TO SPEAK HERE SOO
At Present Is Editor Of Magazine
Of Eugenics Namited
"The Nordic Race"

IFOMER -'^OOTBAl L STAR
iIAY BECOME POLICEMAN y
(1y Associated Press) I
l)ETROIT, Feb. 2S.-Thomas
1 Edwards, Michigan football star
in 1924 and 1925, and an all-I
American tackle, wants to join I
the Detroit police force. He tookI
the physical examination today.
If he is accepted, police of- E
ficials announce, he will be as-
signed to the physical training
1 school.
VARSITY CHEERLEADERI
ANNOUNCE'DAT GAME
Is Presented 11ith Offiefal flegaplhone
Between Halves Of Purdue Game
By Retiring Cheerleader
CHOSEN BY COMMITTEE
Paul W. Endriss, '28, was elected
Varsity cheerleader for the year 1927-

IS NOTED FOR RESEARCH KAUFFMAN IS CHAIRMAN ' tory for several years.
________Is Founder of School
----Though an Englishman Mr. Kennedy
Prof. Edwin C. Schroedinger, of the Michigan' traditional International has spent many years on the Amer-
physics department of the University night will be held tils year on March! ican stage and is one of the founders I
of Zurich, Switzerland, will address 9 in Hill auditorium. Students repre- and trustees of the Millbrook School
members of the physics department sentug 11 foreign nations will take of Liberal and Applied Arts at Mill-
upart in the program and the -numbers I brook, New York. He has introduced
upon "The New Wave Mechaices" on given will consist largely in represen- a new technique into the theater, and
March 9 and 10; his lectures will deal tations of the music and life of the his play "The Chastening"is one of the
with his recent discoveries in that countries represented, as in the past. better known of contemporary play-
- field. The committees in charge, which wrights. This play was given here two
The new theory evolved by Profes- were announced yesterday by Lester years ago when the company visited
sor Schroediger during his research P. Kauffman, '28,'general chairman of the city on one of the previous tours.
of past years will, according to mem- the event, and Prof. A. D. Moore and Mrs. Kennedy, who was formerly
bers of the staff of the department of Mrs. Moore, who will again direct the Edith Wynne Mathison, appeared here
1psysics who are engaged in similar re- production are: programs-Laurence for the first time several years ago
search and who are familidr with Pro-I J. Van Tuyl, '28E, and Cynthia Smith, with the original Ben Greet players
fessor Schoedingers work, be able to '27; publicity, Francis Line, '28; treas- in University hall. She, like her hus-
solve satisfactorily some of the prob- urer, Ellura IHarvey;. posters, Alexis 1 band, is English and started her dra-
lems of atomic structure. Professor Lapteff, '30A; eligibility, Donato Suyat, mniatic career in the field of musical
Schroedinger's work has been recog- '28E; speakers, Nur Malik, '27M. J1comedy. She created the title role in
nized as a valuable contribution to the The central figure of this year's "Everyman" and has toured the coun-
physical field according to reports. His presentation will be a pageant moving try several times in old English coin-
- new theory promises to be an import- by successive stages across the plat- edies and modern plays. Mrs. Kennedy
ant contribution to the theory of the form. The group from each nation will also played the title role in several
atom and the spectrum. It has been occupy the center of the stage as its motion picture productions, chiefly of
stated by authorities that in addition turn comes and then will move on un- an historical nature.
to being an illuminating insight into til all the nations have passed in slow Voice Considered Almost Perfect
the theory of the atom, the new theory review. A ceremonial scene will form Her voice and diction are considered
I offers a possibility of opening a new! the prelude, and an ensemble of all by critics to be among the most per-
1 outlook into this field. I nations provides the finale. Minerva1 feet on the stage. She will play the
Professor Schroedinger at present is Miller, '27, will take the role of the part of Francesca Di Ramini in the
making a lecture trip to foremost Cosmopolitan maid. More than 50 stu- production here tonight.
physical laboratories of the United dents will take part in the program. Margaret Gage, the third member
States, speaking on his own researches " _ _ _of the comany, is a young actress
sand work upon his discovery. C ;r who has ained considerable promin
Estrado And Staff nce for her work with the Kennedys.
i CHU RCHILL SA YS SCKiihooisg tradin tebythe Ke nnedty*n
ALLIES'METHODS Receive Jail Term s shooisatraduayteoKe enett
ALLIES' : NEOT d 0_yhas played with them since her grad-
WERE NOT WISE (Buation. She played the part of the
(By Associated bress A t Youth in "The Chastening" and will
LOS ANGEILES, Feb. 28.-After take the role of Beatrice Portinari in
(y Associated Press) having been denied a new trial, Gen. "The Salutation."
NEW YORK, Feb. 28.-The "battle I Enrictue Estrado, convicted of con-
of attrition" tactics of the Allies on piracy to violate the Neutrality act Senator Pat Harrison, Democrat,
the western front under the generalship in an attemtp to form an army to in-I Mississippi, will set the date for his
of Joffre and Foch wore out the Allies vade Mexico, was sentenced today in appearance here in the near futureI
more than the war of the Germans, Federal court to serve 21 months in according to officers of the Oratorical
charges Winston Churchill, chancellor' the Federal prison at Leavenworth, association. He will be the next speak-
of the exchequer in the Baldwin cabi- Kansas, and pay a $10;000 fine. er on the series and will come as soon
net, whose "The World Crisis-1916- Twelve members of Estrada's staff as his senatorial duties permit. Theo-
1918" is to be released tomorrow. were given prison terms of more than (1 - Roosevelt, Jr., willappear as the
Backing his criticism by, figures a year each and fined from $1,000 to last number on the series this year
"which do not appear to have at all $5,000. on March 29.
been appreciated even in the most Fifty-seven members of the army, Tickets for the performance of the
expert circles," he says that "on the; who had pleaded guilty were given Kennedys tonight are now on sale at
terms of 1915, 1916, and 1917 the Ger- six-month prison sentences with Slater's bookstore and are priced at
man man-power was sufficient to last promises of probation.-$1.00.
indefinitely. In fact in the three years
of the Allied offensive on the western! PASSAGE OF RULE Death
front the Germans actually gaimned to l ; yg e t e at 1 1
the extent of 1,739,000 men more than I FORCED BY D RYS M
their losses. aecomeost In_
"The result of every Allied offensive (By Associated Press) 1 *
was to leave us relatively weaker-- WASHINGTON, Feb. 2-Senate a A)1I1LL
and in some cases terribly weaker- Drys today cracked the whip for the
than the enemy. The aggregate re- first time this season forcing through (By Associated Press)
sult of all of them from 1915 to 1917: the debate limiting -cloture rule on LANSING, Feb. 28.--Unless public
(after deducting the losses on both the administration's prohibition reor opinion demands an open vote of the
sides in the German attack on Ver-aganization measure. et hc a u m
dun) was a French and British cas- Succeeding in this move just Senate on the capital punishment bill
ualty list of 4,123,000 compared to a! the Senate had three times in as many passed by the House last week and
German total of 2,166,000. The pro- days declined to invoke cloture, the' this demand is answered by members
cess of attrition was at work; but it Drys assured passage of the bill of the Senate, the bill may be side-
was on our own side that its which has been consistently demand- tracked in the Senate judiciary com-
ravages fell, and not on the German." ed by Assistant Secretary Andrews, mittee. A majority of the members of
t I General Joffre, in 1915, "the worst chief of the prohibition forces. It i this committee are reported to be
year of the Joffre regime," eclipsed would create bureaus of prohibition against -the bill.
all the "errors of the first shock and customs in the Treasury depart- For several weeks the report has
i year," by an "insensate obstinacy and ment. been current that this committee
lack of comprehension," says the The cloture vote on the -proposal would be the burial ground for the
writer, "when without any large num- was 55 to 27, or one more than the re- capita punisment bill. The attitude
erical superiority, without adequate , quired two-thirds majority and it of Senator George M. Condon, chair-
artillery or munitions, without any broke up the parliamentary tangle in rmnan of the committee, indicates this
novel mechacal method, without any which the Senate had become in- report may prove true unless the ad-
pretense of surprise or maneuver, i volved, definitely displacing as the covates of capital punishment display
without any reasonable hope of vie- unfinished business the Boulder Can- as much aggressiveness and do as
tory, he continued to throw the heroicI yon Dain bill against which a filibus- much lobbying as its enemies have
t but limited manhood of France at the ter has been waged. done in the Senate.
strongest entrenchments." Since the bill passed the House re-

HAS DONE RESEARCH 1928 yesterday afternoon by the com-
mittee composed of the captains and
e managers of the major sports teams,
Dr. Jon Alfred Mjoen, of the Wind~ and the retiring head cheerleader.
eren Laboratorium, Oslo, Norway, will The election of Endriss was an-
speal. on "Criminality and Genius as nounced between halves of the Michi-
Biological Problems" at 4:15 o'clock j gan-Purdue game last night by Rob-
ert Campbell, treasurer of the Univer-
Thursday, March 3, n Natural Science sity. William Warrick, '27, the retir-
auditorium. The lecture will not be ing cheerleader, presented Endriss
technical. with the official megaphone, after
Dr. Mjoen is widely known for his leading his last cheer. The new cheer-
research in eugenics. le is chairman leader will hold office until the last of
Esch im- the basketball season next year.
of the Consultative Eugenics commis- The system of election used yes-
sion of Norway and editor of "The terday was adopted by the Student
Nordic Race." He was a delegate of council during the fall of 1925. War-,
the Norwegian government to the See- rick was the first student chosen un
ond International Congress of Eugen- der the new system. For two previous
ics in New York city in 1921. At the der the ne ste. For w eious
presnt imehe s a embr, or or-years the head cheerleader was elect-,
present time he is a member, for Nor-d by campus ballot at the annual
way, of the International Federation spring elections, and prior to that time
of Eugenic Organizations. ! the office was filled by the selection
On Friday Dr. Mjoen will speak at
the amehourandplac onthe ub adle by a special committee of the
the same hour and place on the sub- council
jest "What Does the Minus-Individual At the present time Endriss is for-
Cost State and Society?" Dr. Mjoen mulating a new plan for organized
is reported to speak English fluently. cheering which will possibly bring
-____ about several innovations. The cheer-
COOLIDGE HOLDS ng squad will be larger next year
VITAL POSITION to handle the crowds in the new stad-
YITA ium, according to present plans.
OF NAVAL MIEET Endriss has issued a call for try-
outs for, the cheerleading squad for
(13v Associated Press)15 o'clock Thursday in room 304 of
WASHINGTON, Feb. 28. - With the Union. Sophomore students and
Great Britain and Japan definitely second semester freshmen are eligible.
committed to the desirability of fur- The junior assistants for next year
ther direct and immediate effort to will be chosen from the sophomore
h l ad tryouts of the past year.

0STERBA AN AN) IHARRIGAN
STAR AS THEY TOGETHER
MAKE 31 PONTS
SCORE AT HALF IS 21-9
Northiwestern Basketball Coach Makes
Favorable Comment On Michigan's
j Powerful Offensive Ability
With the Wolverines showing still
greater improvement in their defense,
and with "Spring-heels" Oosterbaan
and Frank Harrigan scoring 31 points
between them on a fast apd clever of
fense beneath the basket, Michigan
swept aside Purdue, its strongest rival,
with a 42-20 score last night in Yost
field house and advanced one step
nearer to the Conference basketball
title.
iMichigan Has Good Chance
Michigan now holds undisputed
leadership in the Big Ten standing
with eight victories and two defeats
on its record. The Wolverines have
yet to play Chicago and Iowa, meeting
the Maroons on their home floor Sat-
urday night, and Iowa here Monday.
The Wolverines have defeated both
teams this season, but. Chicago is al-
ways feared when playing on its home
floor, and Iowa is still given an out-
side chance to tie for the champion-
ship. To be certain of a tie for the
title, Michigan needs to win but one of
its two remaining games.
Michigan has never shown so great
aim attack under the basket as the one
in which Oosterbaan and Harrigan
featured last night. Long shots were
not in vogue as far as the Wolverines
were concerned for they had little
trouble in wvorking the ball through
the Purdue defense for short shots.
When one of the Wolverines failed
to complete a throw, Oosterbaan was
generally beneath the basket to try
his deadly short shots.
IKent Commends Team
Maurice Kent, basketball coach at.
Northwestern university, who scouted
the Purdue team last night, made the
following comment in regard to Mich-
igan's offense: "At the close of last
season, Michigan had the strongest of-
fense I have ever seen in the Con-
ference, but after tonight's game I am
inclined to believe that the Wolverines
are stronger this year. Undoubtedly
the Oosterbaan-Harrigan combination
beneath the basket is the greatest in
the Big Ten. Oosterbaan is certainly a
great player." -
After a short period at the begin-
ning of the game, Purdue found the
Michigan defense almost impregnable.
The Boilermakers found few opportun-
ities to shoot, and when they had pos-
session of the ball they were forced to
try to score from long range. Purdue's
passing attack was ineffective for the
most part, Chambers and McCoy fea-
turing in snatching the ball away from
the Purdue players when they started
for the basket. On the other hand,
Michigan had little trouble in getting
near the basket, bringing the ball nea
the goal on short passes and by tge
spectacular dribbling of Harrigan.
Close Game Expected
During the first five minutes of play
the game gave prorhise - of being.an
exceedingly close contest, but when
the Boilermakers reached the five
point mark, they seemed to strike a
lull and Michigan scored ten points
before the Boilermakers could break
into the scoringscolumn again. By the
end of the first half, Michigan had
amassed 21 points to 9 for Purdue.

CueC1a c a, av u. g p
France and Italy definitely opposed,
President Coolidge is in a position to
determine with reasonable accuracy
the chances of success with which a(
new attempt on his part to promote
a supplemental naval agreement may
be undertaken.
The British reply to the American
conference suggestion, regarded offi-
cially as a categorical acceptance, was
made public today without comment
from the White House or State de-'
partment. While it outlines certain-
I aspects of British naval policy that
must b~e considered, it leaves the ex-!
act means by which priicples of the
Washington naval treaty might be
extended open to future discussion.
It also cautions as to the necessity of
"capital adjustment" of the proposed
naval conference with the work of
Geneva preparatory commission.
Most officials believe that the mat-
ter now has passed into the realm of
informal diplomatic exchanges. Pos-
sibly these are already in progress
1 and will be continued between the
delegations of the naval powers when
they resume in Geneva, March 21,
the deliberations of the preparatory
commission.
FLEE TWEATHERS
ARCTIC STORMS

WISCONSIN LOSES I
TO ILLINOIS, 32-28
(By Associated Press)
URBANA, Feb. 28.-Illinois shatter-
ed Wisconsin's hopes for a first place
tonight turning back the Badgers, 32
to 28.
Wisconsin was leading at the half
14 tot 11 and the score was tied at 25
all with three minutes to go. Behr
sank a basket and Andrews ,made a
free throw good for the Badger's final
point, while Dormn and Lidsay sent
the ball through the hoop for Illinois
and McKay and Lindsay secured three
points more on free throws.
Hopchkoss' close guarding kept
Captain Dougherity, leader in the Big
Ten i-ace' for individual scoring hon-
ors, from making more than one field
goal.
Peace Movement Is
Begun In Nicaragua
(By Associated Press)
MANAGUA, Feb. 28.-A definite
movement for peace in Nicaragua was
launched here today with tacit ap-
proval of the American authorities
and assurances from President Diaz,
head of the conservative government,
that he will grant safe conduct

Summaries:
MICHIGAN (42)
Oosterbaan, rf .....
Harrigan, if........
McCoy, c.........
Chambers, rg......
Petrie, Ig.........
Truskowski, Ig.
Martin, rf.........
Total...........
PURI UF (20)
Wheeler, rf.......
Hodges, If........
Cummins, e.......
Wilson, rg........
Kemmer, Ig.......
Wilcox rg.
Stevensonif......
Cooper, If.........
Lyle, rf ...........
' Linkemer, rg......
Totals .............
Officials: Schomm
cree; Feezle, Wabash
( NO VAES T

FG
8
1
2
0
0
1
17
FG
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0

FT
1
4
0
1
2
0
0
FT
1
2
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

P
0
2
0
0
0
1
2
0
2
0
0
0
0

Pts.
17
14
2
5
2
0
2
Pts.
3-
4
8
0
0
3
a
0
0
0

!
s

(By Associated Press)
SEWARD, Alaska, Feb. 28.-Alas-
1 ka's halibut fishing fleet, the largest
i in the world, took up its work again
today after having survived one of
the worst storms in recent years-a
hurricane which sent the -270 small
craft scurrying for safety and threat-
ened for a time to swamp the lighter

through
Liberals.

the conservative lines

IT-

BIG TEN STANDI)NGS

to the
7
Pct.
.800

er, Chicago, ref-
h, umpire.
0 PLAY

7 6 11

Wte. 1.

MICHIGAN......8

2

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