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October 06, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

TF MIC - MCAN flATT VY

WIEDN'ESDAY. 0(4TORPR A- 024

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CARDS
AND BATTING WINS
Card Hurler Allows New York Slug-
gers Five Blows To Gain One
Game Advantage For Hornsby
MAKES CIRCUIT CLOUT
Jesse Haines, big right'shanded hur-
ler of the Cardinals, pitched and bat-
ted his team to a 4-0 victory over the
New York Yankees in the third game
of the World's series yesterday in St.
Louis to give St. Louis- an advantage
of two games to one.
After threatening in each of the
first three innings, the Cardinal at-
tack produced results in the fourth
fraine when three runs were pushed
ver as a result of two solid hits and
an error by Koenig. Lester Bell
opened with a single over second.
1Iafey sacrificed, Ruther to Lazzeri.
O'Farrell walked and Bell scored when
Thevenow forced O'Farrell at second,
after which Koenig made a wild throw
to first. Haines then put the game
on ice when he brought the crowd
to its feet with a home run into the
right field stands. Douthit lined to
Koenig to end the inning.
Again in the fifth inning, the Cards
scored, when Southworth singled past
Dugan. Hornsby then shot a single
to center, Southworth going to third
on the blow 4nd scoring a moment
later when Lazzeri threw out Jim Bot-
tomley at first. At this time Reuther
was sent to the showers and the vet-
eran, Bob Shawkey, went. to the hill.
Koenig threw out Bell at first while
Hornsby took third. Dugan ended the'
inning and also the scoring for the
day, when he made a beautiful one-
handed stop of Hafey's drive which
looked like a sure hit, and recovered
in time to throw him out at first.
Ruther Inieffective
Thereafter, the gHornsbys never
threatened, securing but one hit off
the offerings of Shawkey and Thomas,
the latter pitching the eighth inning
after Shawkey had retired for a pinch
hitter. Huggins' original choice for
mound duty, lefthanded "Dutch" Reu-
ther, was lacking in effectiveness, and
although he escaped unscathed up to
the fourth inning, he had a close call,
the Cards garnering a hit off him in
each of the first three innings.
Haines on the other hand was never
in danger, keeping the Yankee's five
hits scattered over as many innings.,
His fast ball was working in fine
shape, although he issued three bases
on balls.;

GAIN

SERIES

EDGE

OVER

YANKS;

SCORE, 4-0

I

VETERAN PITCHER, OUTFIELDER
TRADED TO LEAGUE CHAMPIONS
* ...*.

'WORK PROGRESSES.
ONGRIDSTADIUM
Work on the new University of
Michigan football stadium is going!
ahead as fast as weather conditions
will permit. Contractors hope to
finish the excavation some time before
the first of the year.
Conditions have been unfavorable'
and the 'many rains have held back
the work considerably. The clay soil!
of the stadium becomes practically
impassible for the trucks after a
heavy rain.
A crew of 200 men are now at work
and equipment is being rushed to aug-
ment the nine steam shovels, the sev-
eral pile drivers, and the belt evcava-,
for already being used.
About 200,000 yards of earth remain,
of which 25,000 have already been

INVERNESS GOLFERS OF TOLEDO
DEFEAT MICHIGAN TEAM,

22,

141

Eight golfers representing the In-
verness Country Club of Toledo, Ohio,
yesterday defeated eight student golf-
ers over the Barton Hills course by a
score of 22 to 14.
Harold Wdbber and F. Southard of
Toledo won all nine points in their
match with David Ward and John
Bergelin of Michigan. Ira Bailey and
Frank Webber halved the points in
their match with Fred Glover and Al
Vyse by winning four and one half
points.
Dr. Warner and F. Brundage won
three points while T. H. Goodspeed
and John Glover captured six. C.
Brundage and F. Duttweiler of Toledo
took five and one-half points and H.
taken out. The excavation is now
progressing at a rate of 2,000 yards a
day.

S. Rhodes and Hugo Krave won three
and one-half.
Pairings for thi all-campus tourna-
ment are as follows: Ward vs. Cole,
Harrison vs. Pfaffman, Bergelin vs.
J. Glover, Rhodes vs. Vyse, Hastings
vs. Branch, Lewis vs. Krave, F. Glover
ovs. Dolliver, Goodspeed vs. Brown.
McConnell and Hall, who also quali-
fied for memberships in the Ann Arbor
Golf Club tournament with scores of
160 for the 36 holes, lost a draw to
Brown who had the same score. The
first round must be played today or
tomorrow.
DETROIT-Officials of the National
Dairy exposition, which will open here
Wednesday, claim it will be the big-
gest of its kind in history.

ISPORTSMIAN'S PARK UTNABLE
TO ACCOlIODATE BALL FANS
(By Associated Press)
Thousands of persons who
traveled many miles to see the
Cardinals and the Yankees play
the third game of the world ser-
ies seemed doomed to disap-
pointment today. There was not
nearly enough room at Sports-
man's Park to care for the
crowds.
Eager fans stood in line
through the night in order to
procure bleacher seats. Many of
those arriving late without tick-
ets declared that they had "a
friend" who would get the prec-
ious pasteboards for them.
Patronze baly Advertisers.

41

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DISTINCTIVE
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The New York Giants decided at close of last season that Billy
Southworth's days as an outfieldet were about done as far as his value
to the Gotham team was concerned and allowed him-to depart to the St.
Louis Cardinals. The St. Louis Browns decided a year ago that Joe
Bush and a couple of young pitchers would be more valuable to that team
than Urban Shocker and allowed him to go to the Yankees. Close ob-
servers at the World series find these happy castoffs fighting for the win-
ner's and loser's end of the purse.

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Those Who Know Us Know the Qtality of Our Goods.

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Rain halts Play
Rain began to fall shortly after
noon while the Cardinals were at bat-
ting practice and there was doubt as
to whether the game would be played.
Those in the bleachers were soaked,
unless fortunate -enough to have um-
brellas or raincoats, and the box
holders rushed for the stands. After
the band had played "It Ain't Goin' to
Rain.No More," the heavens complied
and the sun came out as the tarpaulin
was dragged from the diamond.
Again in the first half of the fourth,
with the score still tied, at 0-0, a tor-
rent of rain fell, drenching the field,
but did not last long and play was
resumed after a short delay. Babe
Ruth was first to bat after the rain,
and the Bambino delivered with a
clean single, for which he received
neither boos or cheers. This was quite
different from his reception in New
York, where his every move was

-
By Wilton A. Simpson ,
After two days review of the funda-
mentals, Coaches Yost and Wieman
feel that the men on the football squad
have improved enough to hold a
scrimmage this afternoon. No defi-
nite time is set for the scrimmage,
but it undoubtedly be held late in the
afternoon, after Yost has sent the
squad through a long passing and
blocking drill.
The coaches placed considerable
stress upon co-ordination and
team play 'in yesterday's work-
out. Against the Oklahoma Aggies
the men looked 'fair enough in-
dividually, but lacked strength
when working as a team. Of
course, it is unreasonable to ex-
pect perfect team play when the
referee sounds 'like a traffic pol-
iceman, admitting substutes
every other play. In Saturday's
game Yost used six tackles, seven
guards and six ends.
Illinois and Ohio State each had

three scouts in the press box to watch
Michigan's style of play Saturday.
Michigan State had two and Minne-
sota sent one from Minneapolis. They
had little to say about the game, but
all thought that this man Molenda
was quite a man.
Harry Klpke scouted the Min.
nesota team last year and has
drawn the assigmnmet to watch
the Gophers play -Notre Dame
Saturday. nlnnesota overwhelmed
Tod Rockwell's North Dakota
eleven by a 51 to 0 score Satur.
day and the Irishmen from South
Bend ran from end of the field to
the other to aggregate 77 points.
Rockne's batting average will un-
doubtedly be reduced . when he
meets Dr. Spears at lĀ°inneapolis.
Life just won't be the same on the
campus this year. What with SatuT-
day classes, few automobiles, and no
Robert Henderson reviews--What will
we do?

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Wrt f rptp ( ottripiatp (glot4ps 4nv

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Adler Hand Tailored Clothes
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cheered by the Gothamites.
BOX SCORE'S
= New York
AB RE
Combs,cf......... 3 0 :
Koenig, ss ........4 0 4
Ruth, if ............ 3 0
Meusel, rf.......... 4 0 C
Gehrig, lb ......... 4 0
Lazzeri, 2b.........4 0 C
D~ugan,3,b......... 30:1
Severeid, c.......2 0 C
Ruether, p.........2 0 C
Bhawkey, p........ 0 0 C
xiPaschal ...........00C
Thomas, p..0 0
Totals ...........29 0 5
St. Louis
AB R H
)outhit ef,......... 3 00
Southworth, 2b .... 3 12
H{ornsby,2b........4 0
Bottomley lb....4 01
L. Bell, 3b .._...... 4 11
Hafey, if........... 3 01
OFarrell, c.........2 0
Thevenow, ss....... 3 10
Hlaines, p......3 12

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4 0
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9 0
4 5
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3 0
0 2
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0 0
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24 12

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$30

"THE MICHIGAN"
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on the campus. Come in to-
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will say the same thing.
Whether you are ready to
buy or not, come in, try the
Michigan on.
"The Michigan"
designed by Mr. Del Prete
Twenty-one years experi-
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clothes.
Why buy inferior quality
clothes for more money?
COLLEGIATE
MODEL
OVERCOATS
50 Inches Long
$141;25 to $650
Blues and Browns

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PO A E
0 1 0 0
2 2 0 '0
1 13 0 0
1 0 4 0
2 0 2 0

'11.
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ay'
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*L
$7M

I'lep-

Totals............29 4 8 27120
New York............000 000 000-0
St. Louis ............000 310 00x-4
xBated for Shawkey in eighth.
Summaries:

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THE DEFINITE CHARACTERISTICS WHICH

II _ I

11

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