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October 06, 1926 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-06

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ESTABLISHED
S1890

Sir i4au

Iaittj

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

s nr vv c-xrrr n.,, o -

I

VL. XXXVII. No. s

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.

- I ~ I

FRESHMAN SMOKER
IS SUCCESS VITH
OVE 000PRESENT
P~lESiI)ENT I T BTI'S ADVICE
FEATURES ASSEMtBLY
AT 'NION
FRIEDMAN GIVES TALK

Lester Johnsonu rges All Men To'
Out For Union Committee
Positions

Try

Starting things off for their class
with decded enthusiasm, more thar
600 members of the class of '30 last
night gathered in the assembly hall
of the Union for their annual recep-
tion and general "get-together." Vig-
ours cheering, an address of welcome
and advice by President Clarence Cook
Little, and talks by Ben Friedman,
'27, Varsity football captain, and Les-
ter F. Johnson, '27L, president of the
Union, were the main features on the
evenings' program.
President Little's address came as
the climax of the program. Empha-
sizing the multitude of opportunities
offered in a great university. Presi-
dent Little center his advice to the
freshmen on three main observations,
the chance to accept opportunities for
development of one's self, the value
of facing one's own problems, and the
necessity for cultivating a strong
loyalty for one's university.
"There is no value in any position,
whether of honor, in athletics, or in
any other form of activity," said
President Little, "except as it is an
opportunity, a bigger, finer chance,
given to improve and strengthen one's
character. It is only -as these oppor-
tunities are used conscientiously that
any appearance of value attaches it-
self to college life.",
In realizing this fact, President Lit-
tle said that "an intense study of
yourself, followed by an equally in-
tense spreading out along improved
lines of action" was of primary im-
portance.
"Don't, in all the numerous con-
fusion of university group contacts,
lose sight of the value of facing your
own problems for yourself," was his
advice.
Continuing, President 'Little em-
phasized the'importance of university
loyalty, and the importance of realiz-
ing, to the fullest possible extent,
every bit of university life. "Love of
your university, and its associations
will be the finest sentiment you will
ever have come into your life. As
you get further away from your col-
lege life you will realize that it is the
greatest love that any man can ever
feel, love and deep loyalty for his col-
lege."
William V. Jeffries, '27, acting chair-
man of the meeting, introduced Ben
Friedman, '27, Varsity football cap-
tain, as first speaker on the program.
Friedman, in speaking of Michigan's
"year-to-year spirit of- carrying on,"
stressed the conviction that every-
thing which this spirit represented
depnded on the incoming class and
their ability to concentrate their en-
ergy In ryi ng on this spirit.
Lester F. Johnson, '27L, president
of the Union, welcomed the freshmen
tO the Union, invited them to become
acquainted with all it had to offer as
an institution, and urged them to par-
ticipate in its varied and profitable
activities.
Entertainment for the occasion was
provided by Kenneth C. Midgley, '28L,
who's "Victors" xylophone number
got an enthusiastic reception from the
gathering.
Immediately following the program
of speeches, President Little person-
ally greeted members of the class, and
the meeting was concluded with cider
and donahnuts for refreshments.
Paul Buckley. '05, new general man-
ager of the Union. who was scheduled
to outline the policy of the Union for
the coming year, was unable to be
present.
PI BLIC SALE OF
M S. C, TICKETS
TO BEGIN TODAY
Public sale of ticlets for the Michi-
gan State college game will be begsi
today at 8 o'clock, according to Harry
Tillotson, business manager of the
Athletic association. Many excellent
seats remain, and advance applica-
tlrns point to a sell out in the next
few days.
"Wall climbers" have caused the
Athletic association no end of trouble
in the past football games, and to

avoid this difficulty in the future, Mr.
Tillotson has arranged to have a large
detail of state nolice to guard the

I3 LARGE PART OF OHIO0 STATE
TICKETS ARE ALREADY SOLD
More than 9,000 of the 15,000
tickets allotted to Michigan for
the 'Ohio State game have al
ready been disposed of, accord-
ing to a statement issued by
Harry Tillitson, business mana-
ger of the Athletic association.
Most of tile tickets disposed of
to date have been solo to alumni
Iand residents of the state, and.
while applications continue to
pour into the Athletic office in
greater volume every day, stu-
dent applications are just begin-
ning to arrive. Mr. Tillitson
stated that it was impossible to
obtain any more Ohio tickets.
Theer are less tickets left for
the Navy game than the Ohio
game. "More than 5,000 of the
7,500 Michigan tickets for the
Navy game have been disposed
of, and it was not until the last
few days that student applica-
tions began to arrive," Mr. Til-
litson stated.
Michigan's 7,500 tickets for the
Navy game are in one single
block which begins at the five
yard line and ends to the 50
yard line. Mr. Tillitson was not
positively certain that a new
supply of Navy tickets eould be
obtained.
FLOODS ISOLATE
ILLINOIS TOWNS1

More Than One Hundred Families
Made Homeless By Continuous
Rise of River Waters
LOWLANDS SUBMERGED
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 5.-Flood waters'
which rose today in Illinois while
they receded in adjacent states, cen-
tered their wrath tonight at Beards-
town, Illinois, which watched its last
path to the outside world slowly van-
ish under the rising tide of the Illi-
nois river.
With more than a hundred square
blocks submerged by water and more
than a hundred families homeless as'
the result of the bursting of levees
along the Illinois river and Lost creek,
the city was in a delemma of two ad-
vancing overflows, with water four
feet deep in some main streets and
residents living on the uper floors
of the structures.
At Peoria, Whitehall, Carrollton and
other central Illinois cities, levees
broke or threatened to give way today
and lowlands were submerged.
One hundred and fifty men patrol-
led the Hillview levee at Whitehall
with sandbags to plug recurring
breaks, and the Illinois river at Peoria,
rising a foot in a day, had driven resi-
dents from the water front and threa-
tened the dike.
In Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri,
where floods did harm Sunday and
Monday, the water was receding ex-
cept at the confluences of major
streams, although the Mississippi
river stood at flood state at Cape
Girardeau, Missouri, swelled by heavy
rains to the north, and inundated low-
lands.
Prelates Pay Visit
To Lincoln's Tomb
(By Associated Press)
URBANA, Ill., Oct. 5.-Passing in
the footsteps of thousands, the Lord
Bishop of London, the Rt. Hon. and
Rt. Rev. A. F. Winnington-Ingram,
D.D., today knelt in the tomb of
Abraham Lincoln at Springfield,
and departing was presented with a
souvenir, a stick of wood from Lin-
coln's log cabin home.
When he returns to England, he will
place it in Fulham Palace, seat of
London's bishop for 1300 years.
"It is such a wonderful remem-
brance of Lincoln and his great work,"
commented the Lord Bishop upon be-
ing presented with the small slab of
rough wood by Lincoln's shrine keep-
er. It had been mounted f0 special
presentation to the prelate.
"I deem it a great honor to be pre-
sented with this remembrance," he
said. "I have long been a student
and admirer of Lincoln."
STANDING COMMITTEES
SELECTED BY ALPHA NU
Alpha Nu literary society held its
second meeting of the year last night
it 7-30 o'clAok in its roAms in Ang1el

SALE OF GERMAN
BONDS INlU. 5. 15
EUROPEAN POLIC
FRANCE LOOKS FORWARD TO
READY CASH PLAN
WILL BRING
WILL RATIFY PACT
Stabilization Of Franc And Payment
Of The War Debt Would Result
From Success Of Plan
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, France, Oct. 5.-Flotation
of German railroad, industrial and
reparation bonds in the United States
has become a settled policy of the
principal continental allied countries
entitled to reparations.
The French goverment, which for-
merly was adverse to the scheme be-
cause of the large sacrifices it would
be Qbligated to make in order to ren-
der the securities attractive to Amer-
ican investors, now is earnestly in
favor of the scheme because of the
ready cash in dollars the flotation of
the bonds would make available for
use in Premier Poincare's stabiliza-
tion plan.
France, Italy and Belgium, who have
been especially interested in the pro--
ject, have had the matter up at Wash-
ington, it was authoritatively learned
today. They seek to persuade the
American government to allow Ameri-
can banks to interest themselves in
the project. It is understood the
French used the argument that float-
ing these bonds will make it easier
for France to stabilize the franc and
hence make the payment of war debt
less burdensome.
Premier Poincare, it was said, on
excellent authority, has given assur-
ance to Washington that ratification
of the Mellon-Berenger settlement of
French war debts to the United States
will be pushed in the hope of getting
favorable action on it before the end
of November.
The premier told M. Simon, chair-
'man of the finance committee of the
chamber of deputies, that the govern-
ment would ak parliament to ratify
the agreement with reservations
along the lines of his recent speech
at Bar-le-Duc.
The general opinion is that ratifica-
tion can be obtained under these con-
ditions while unqualified approval of
the Washington accord is impossible.
The government, it is understood, will
allow deputies to make reservations
in speeches, which, supported by an
official declaration, will go into the
French congressional record, but will
not be incorporated into the resolu-
tions of ratification.
Many deputies, including M. Frank-
lin-Bouillon, chairman of the foreign
relations committee, will fight to have
reservations added to the resolutions
of ratification. The issue probably
will turn on that question.
Premier Poincare is expected to
link ratification with the proposed
operations in German reparation
bonds, pointing out how stabilization
of the franc would be furthered by
immediate favorable action on the set-
tlement with the possibility that i
would be followed by the consent of
the American government that the
bonds be placed on the American
market.
ELBER T H. GARY
FINDS BUSINESS
CONDITIONS GOOD
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Oct. 5.-On the eve

of his 80th birthday anniversary which
he wil celebrate next Friday, Elbert
H. Gary, chairman of the U. S. Steel
corporation, today passed his eye over
the business horizon and found condi-
tions "very satisfactory."
Taking an even broader view, he
said he was becoming more and more
convinced that serious business slumps
weer no longer necessary, that the
majority of people desired prosperity
and would do their utmost to maintain
It, that the growing competition from
foreign trade would probably be
friendly and less injurious than that
originating in the United States, and
that the Ford plan of a five day week
for industrial workers was unecono-
mic.
"I shall require further proof," said
Mr. Gary, "believe I am satisfied thatI
any man . or any number of men can{
do as much work in five days of eight
hours each as could be secured in six
days of eight hours each."
In outlining his views on the busi-
ness situation, Mr. Gary explained he
wag wilineo naccen+ the. nredied-in

M. POINCAREI
Premier of France, who is endeav-
oring to achieve a settlement of the
American war debt before the end of
November.
'CHILEN MINISTER
Collier Declares He Knows Nothiig
Of Demuonstrations Hostile
To His Return
CLAIMS IMPARTIALITY
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Oct. 5.-William M. Col-
lier, American ambassador to Chile,
who expects to return to his post
about the end of the year, gave out a
statement tonight with reference to
the recent protests of some of the
Chilean people aganist his resuming
his ambassadorial functions at Santi-
ago.
"I know nothng about demonstra-
tions in any part of Chile," he said,,
"against my return there upon the
expiration of my present leave.
"The statement that I have ever
shown favoritism for Peru is absolute-
ly incorect. I have at all times ob-
served that strict impartiality which
was incumbent upon me as represen-
tative of the President of the United
States as arbitrator.
"My sincere friendship for Chile is
well known. My desire is to see her
establish relations of harmony with
the neighboring republics of South
America and I believe in the disinter-
ested friendship of the United States-
My relations with the Chilean govern-~
ment are excellent.1
"The Tacna-Arica question has
aroused bitter passion. I have always
believed, and still believe, that it will1
be amicably settled il a short time.
It is to the interest of both Peru and1
Chile that this be done, so that they
may develop their great resources1
without constant fear of war. The1
Chilean government ' has proclaimed
its desire for a settlement and its wil-1
lingness to make the great sacrifices.
I believe in the sincerity of that de-
claration, for it is in accordance with
the traditional Chilean diplomatic
policy.
"I do not believe Chile will abandon
its efforts to reach an enduring con-
ciliatory solution of this acute prob-
1em and insist upon one particular
experience seems to have shownthat
method, namely the plebiscite, whe
a plebiscitary campaign necessarily
engenders strong racial and national
hatred, and prevents, rather than pro-
motes, an harmonious settlement."
Athletic Directors
Of Big 3 Will Meet
Regarding Relationsj
CAMBRIDG E, Mass., Oct. 5.-Ath-
letic authorities of Harvard, Yale andI
Princeton will meet in New Haven to-
morrow to discuss matters of import-
ance regarding athletic relations
among the th'ree colleges, it became
known tonight. No announcement
was made concerning the addenda of
the conference.
William J. Bingham, director of ath-
letics at Harvard, will represent the
Crimson at the New Haven meeting.
Professors Middleton and Kennedy,
directors of athletics at Yale and1
Princeaon, respectively, will speak for
those two colleges.
It was believed here that athletic
heads would discuss recent reports
Ifni+ Tun r id ni.,nna i --v ", -+~

PREMIER HASTENS
DEET SETTLEMENT

NATIONAL STUDENT
CONGRESS TOMEET
HEREINDCEBE
COLLEGES WITH ENROLLMENT OF
MORE THAN W0 ARE
MEMBERS
MEIKLEJOHN TO SPEAK
Leland Returns From Cambridge Af-
ter Renewing University's
Invitation
After renewing the University's in-
vitation to the National Student Fed-
eration to hold its second annual con-
gress in Ann Arbor, Dec. 2-4, Robert
Leland, '27, junior representative of
the Student council, returned to this
city from Cambridge, Mass., yesterday
morning. The invitation was again
'heartily accepted by the executive
committee of the federation, which
held a special meeting at Cambridge
last Saturday for the purpose of ar-
ranging the details of the 'second con-
gress.
Every college and university in the
United States having an enrollment
of more than 500 students is a mem-
ber of the new organization. Dele-
gates from these institutions, includ-
ing women's colleges, will send rep-
resentatives to Ann Arbor in Decem-
ber which are expected to number
more than 300.
The three-day congres here will con-
sist of two large meetings of all dele-
gates and a score of group discussion
sessions, according to present plans.
Speakers of national prominence, in-
cluding such well known educators as
Alexander Meiklejohn, wil be brought
here to address the student assem-
blies.
Topics for discussion wil cover all
phases of American college and uni-
versity life with emphasis on certain
subjects including school curricula,
athletics and fraternities.
The federation is' an outgrowth of
the Student World Court conference
held at Princeton, N. J., last winter.
John Elliott, '26, representing the
University, at that time extended an
invitation to the delegates to meet
here in December.
The'Student council will be in com-
plete charge of the federation's con-
gress in Ann Arbor.
Mussolini Outlines
Fascist Philosophy
In Talk To Italians'
(By Associated Press)
TERUGIA, Italy, Oct. 5.-Proclaim-
ing that Fascism stands for a new
political system and that its adher-
nts constitute a new genu of civili-
ation, Benito Mussolini, the Fascist
premier, after a lecture on "Ancient
Rome on the Sea," here today, spoke
>n what may be termed an outline of
he Fascist philosophy.
"I am glad to pass from history to
he avid and living humanity of
Fascism when it is possessed of a soul
of which I am a part," he said. "Af-
er four years, during which the Fas-
1st government has accomplished gi-
;antic progres in all fields, we are
till on -the breach as behooves loyal
olders whose duty it is to be ready
for all battles.
"I am going to tell you something
that will be pleasing to your dis-
qnieted spirits.
"I have a duty to accomplish. I
have orders to respect. I have taken
upon myself an engagement to give
naterial and moral grandeur to the
Italian people. That order, that su-
preme duty, was not given to me by
petty lawmaking assemblies or by
political circles. It was conferred
upon me by all or most all the Italian

ts state of civil minority in which
people, which has finally thrown off
t was held by inapt or feeble gov-
ernment. Today the Italian nation is
regarded tranquilly in the eye of other
peoples because it is felt that in Italy
something has been accomplished of
enormous interest, historical and poli-
ical, to all states and all peoples."
ORGAN RECITAL
TODA Y TO OPEN
MUSICAL SEASON
Officially inaugurating the campus
musical season, Palmer Christian,
university organist and head of the
organ department of the University
School of Music, will give the first of
his weekly recitals at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon in Hill auditorium. These
twilight recitals are now in their third
season.
ro,- .d - he in nr--+ in + m l

i
i
i
I

FEW TICKETS REMAIN FOR
BLOCK 'M' AT M. S. C. GAME
All reserved seats for the M.
S. C. game Saturday are now in
the malls with the xeception of
a few in the block 'M' of the
cheering section which have not
yet been applied for by those
students who enrolled in the sec-
tion during registration week.
The Athletic association has
agreed to hold these seats for a
few days, as a special privilege
to those who have failed to ap-
ply, in order that the new cheer-
ing bloc may be complete Sat-
urday. Those students in the
section, therefore, are urged to
send in their applications at once
to complete the block 'M.'
William Warrick, '21, Varsity
cheerleader, stated yesterday
that under no condition will a
student be admitted to the cheer-
ing section Saturday without a
uniform. There are several at
IMoe's Sport Shop, which have
not yet been called for.
A few more seats in the bloc
will be on sale at the Union
from 9 until 2 o'clock tomorow
for any men students who desire
seats in the reserved section,
even though they have sent in
their applications.

I .I

FRATERNITY BOY
ELECTS OFFICERS1

John R.
By

Boland, '27, Made President
Interfraternity Council
In Special Meeting

FIRST MEETING PLANNED
John R. Boland, Jr., '27, Phi Mu
Delta, was elected president of the In-
terfraternity council at a special
meeting of that organization held yes-
terday afternoon at the Union. Robert
Shambaugh, '28, Zeta Psi, was chosen
secretary, and Frank Graham, '27,
Phi Kappa Psi, was selected treasurer.
Charles Gilbert, '2S, 81gma Phi, was
elected from group one to act on the
judiciary committee of the council,
and Howell Rus, '27, Sigma Zeta, was
chosen from group two as a member
of that committee. Boland was elected
from group three, Shambaugh from
group four, and Graham from group
five.
Nominations of five members of the
faculty and five alumni representa-
tives were made yesterday from which
President Clarence Cook Little will
chose one faculty member and Dean
Joseph A. Bursley will select one
alumnus, residing in Ann Arbor, to
serve on the judiciary committee with
the three officers and the two students
elected yesterday. The other two
members of the committee of nine are
Prof. O. J. Campbell, Delta Kappa Ep-
silon, of the faculty, and Herman
Kleene, Alpha Delta Phi, of the
alumni, who were elected to two-year
terms a year ago.
Dean Bursley conducted the meeting
yesterday until the election of Boland.
The first regular meeting of the coun-
cil will be held next Monday after-
noon at the Union. Only a few fra-
ternities were not represented at yes-
terday's meeting.
STUDENT SUES COLLEGE
LECTURER FOR DAMAGES
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 5.-Prof. Adolph J.
Snow, lecturer in psychology at
Northwestern university, has been
sued for $350 by a student, claiming
the money was promised him for re-
writing one of the professor's books.
The suit was filed by Philip Jordan,
senior, prominent on the campus, who
said the volume originally was 609
pages long and was finding little pop-
ularity. At the request of Professor,
Snow, he condensed the book to 200
pages and made other changes last
spring, Jordan set out, claiming that
the $350 was refused when he declined
to do additional rewriting. Jordan is
chairman of the board of the Daily
Northwestern, student publication,
and is a member of a number of other
student bodies.
LITTLE AND SMITH TO
SPEAK AT CONVENTION
Registrar Ira M. Smith left early
yesterday morning for Marquette,
Mich., where he will attend the sev-
enth district meeting of the Michigan
State Teachers' association. This
meeting was transferred from Iron-
wood, where it was previously sched-
uled. Registrar Smith will explain

iSOCIAL WORKERS-
OPEN CONFERENCE
IN UNIONTONIGHT
PRE-CONVENTION REGISTRATION
SHOWS HUNDREDS WILL BE
AT MEETING

' MICHIGAN MEN TO SPEAK
President Little And John A. Lapp,
President Of Conference, Will
Discuss Social Work
Hundreds of social workers in
Michigan and nAny from adjoining
states will be in attendance at the
state conference of social work which
officially opens at 8 o'clcok tonight in
the Union, pre-convention registration
shows. The meeting will come to a
close Friday afternoon, with the com-
pletion of one of' the best programs
ever arranged by the organization.
All sessions of the conference will
be held at the Union except the hos-
pital social workers' luncheon, which
will be held at the University hos-
pital.
The convention will open tonight
with President Clarence Cook Little
and John A. Lapp, president of the na-
tional conference of social work, as
the principal speakers. Both will dis-
cuss various phases of social work
and its importance to the world at
large. Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, of the
Graduate'school, will be the presid-
ing officer.
Dr. Potter Will Speak
The address of Dr. Ellen C. Potter,
secretary of welfare work in Penn-
sylvania, will hold the attention of
the delegates Thursday morning. After
her speech, Francis R. Lowell, of the
Michigan Children's Aid society, will
lead discussion on "Coordination of
public officials." "Oakland County
Welfare Board" will be discussed by
Judge Frank L. Covert, of the sixth
judicial circuit of Michigan; and Dr.
R. H. Haskell, director of Wayne
county training school, will speak on
"State Owned Institutions." Dr. II.
A. Haynes, director of University hos-
pital, will preside at this session.
The luncheon of the Michigan asso-
elation of hospital social workers
comes Thursday neon. "The Hospital
Social Worker In Her Varied Rela-
tionships" will be discussed by Mrs.
C. W. Webb, president of the Ameri-
can association of hospital social
workers. Thursday noon there will
also be a luncheon for sociology
teachers and students, at which Prof.
Arthur E. Woods, of the sociology de-
partment, will preside.
The afternoon session Thursday
will be opened by Chrales S. Johnson,
editor of "Opportunity," whose topic
will be "Interstate Migration of Neg-
roes with +Particular Reference to
Michigan." Discussion will be led by
Charles Campbell, division of negro
welfare and statistics of the depart-
ment of labor, and R. T. Lansdale, co-
director of the Detroit negro survey.
C. M. Novak, principal of Northeastern
high school, Detroit, will preside.
Miss- S. P. Breckinridge, professor
of soccial economy at the University
of Chicago, will, speak Thursday night
on "Coordination of social work in
the city." "Coordination of social
work in the country" will be expound-
ed by Prof. Eben Mumford, of Michi-
gan State college. W. J. Norton, sec-
retary of the Detroit Community Un-
ion, will preside at the evening ses-
sipn.
Dean Bates Will Preside
Friday morning, the social workers
will be divided into two groups for
discussion. The first group willi dis-
cass the topic, "Urban Aspects of So-
ei ork," and the second gathering
wi talk on the subject, "Workable
Program in Rural Social Work."
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, will preside at the final ses-
sion Friday afternoon. Francis H.
Hiller, field secretary of the national
probation association, will speak on
"Probation in Michigan." Shirley
Stewart, Port Huron attorney, will
give an address the subject of which
will be "The Program of the Michigan
State Commission of Inquiry into
Criminal Procedure."
' The officers of the state conference
of social work are: president, Miss
Dorothy Ketcham, Ann Arbor; secre-.
tary, R. T. Lansdale, Ann Arbor;
treasurer, Miss C. C. Donnell, Grand
Rapids; chairman of finance commit-
tee, Prof. C. R. Hoffer, East Lansing;

chairman of membership committee,
William G. Robinson, Jackson; and
chairman of program committee, Miss
Alice H. Walker, Detroit.
COMMANDER UNABLE TO
COME; SMOKER DELAYED

,

I'M

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