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January 06, 1927 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, $ANUARY 6, 192?

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WEEK OF MARCH 15 IS Is Author Of This
ATE O J IYear s Junior Play
Production Uses Traditional Ann Ar.
Bair Sefting And Is Noted For
Its iL uorois Lines
PiSTERS ARE DUE SOON!
Presentation of the 23rd annual Jun-;
for Girls' pjay will begin Tuesday,
March 15, an continue throughout the
week. The book selected from those
turned in by junior women to the cen-
Sral committee, was written by Esther
lerrick, '28, of Saginaw, and no re-
Siraon by a faculty member has been
nec5 esary.
Like former productions, this year's
play is a college play with a typical
hwcal setting. Both acts are laid in
un Arbor and the characters are col-
t e students. The production will
hie few if any comedy\"chairacters,
,nd will depend for its comedy rather
on humor of lines and situation ratherj
than on character.j
The play will this year depart from 'Esthier Merrick
b e past custom in that it will be di-
re It ta m b of t lass. Collegiate atmosphere is featured in
P'hyllis Loughton who has been select- the 23rd annual Junior Girls' play
ed as director is well known both as ,which isth work of ther Merrick,
a director and actress in campus dram- '28, of Saginaw. The play was chosen
aties. rTle scenery will also be de- for its well written dialogue and will
signed by members of the class thus be presented at the Whitney theater
making the play entirely a junior class the week beginning March 15.
production. 'The central committee of the play
Second tryouts for chouses are be- is as yet undecided -concerning the
ing hell this week, but due to the ill- name of the play, although the choice
ness of Miss Loughton, cast tryouts
have been postponed to a later date. ion of the committee will be announe-
Anniouncement will be made of the ed soon.
date of cast tryouts as soon as itis
desired FiM PRODUCTION IS
-Dcsigns for the Junior Girls' play
pOster contest must be turned in by 5 CALLED WOIEN'S WORK
o'clockc Friday, Jan. 14, at the Wo--
men 's league office, to receive consid- LONDON. - Britain's first woman
(r atiOfl. All women making posters film producer, Miss Dina Shurey, be-
re asked to call Margaret Hawkins at I lieves women have as much chance as
578. 10men in film producing, and perhaps
The designer of the winning poster more. "Women have . greater or-
will be awarded $10 toward her lifo iginality than men," asserted the new
membership in the Women's league producer, "they have usually a great-
and have her poster appear as the er sense of artistic values, and are bet-
cover design of the Junior Girls' play ter qualified to judge the human in-
proarams. Judges i iithe contest will terest power of a picture than men.
be J. B. Slusser, instructor of drawins "British films will succeed when half
and painting, Betty Nutt, general of the present directing forces is elim-
chiairnan of the play and Phyllis inated," Miss Shurey ventured. She
Loughton, director of the production. contends that most of the British pro-
ducers have no enthusiasm for the
Patronize Daily Advertisers, goods they have to sell.

JOURNALISM STUDENTS TOUR EUROPE
TO INVESTIGATE FOREIGN CONDITIONS
Women have not won the emanci- for a man to work on a foreign paper.
pation in Europe that they have in Careful study of foreign news scurcest
the United States, according to the revealed the fact that much of the
opinion of a number of journalism stu- news published in European papers is}
dents who spent part of the past sum- propoganda furnished by the politic
mer in Europe. The occasion was af jans which accounts for the fac tii
journalism tour under E. Marion John- the news sounds sketchy and biascd
son, head of the department of journ- when we read it here. This met o i
alism at the University of Minnesota, would not appeal to the average Am
and formerly professor of journalism erican reader and it is avoided ord-
at the University of Wisconsin. inarily.
The idea is a new one and in the Salaries on the continental papers
opinion of the leader was such a sue- were found to be inadequate. Engand
cess that he plans to make it an an- however was an exception to this rulE.
nual event. In hiis work at the univer- Because of her disinterediness in Eui
sity Mr. Johnson found the need for ropean affairs America is losing pres-
a better understanding of European tige in government and political cir-
conditions in order that American cles and the tourists found that the
news writers might interpret foreign powers are loathe to give out news of
Inews more intelligently. The party of their affairs to disinterested Amweri-
tourists was composed of both men ,ans. Much that is important as news
and women students, active journal- is carried out secretly and given or
ists and special writers numbering 50 only tas officials see fit. Thersin W1
in all and representing 14 states. the danger of having the informlation
With the exception of the offices of already colored when the re,.rter
the Paris editions of the American gets it.
papers it was found that it would be! -
very difficult for a woman to obtain A revision of the Diet of Japan has
a position on a foreign newspaper, been advocated to allow women to be
and in spite of the complications that admitted to the bar. At present no
a foreign language would arouse, it woman is eligible to Practice before
would take long apprenticeship even the Japanese courts.
---4

STAGE NOVEL REVOLT I N O T I C E S .French women have scored another
! ___- the election of Madame Suzanne Reb-
Refusal of the freshman women at There will be a cabinet meeting of ert-Schreiber as secretary of the Rad-
Whitman college, Walla Walla, Wash., the Y. W. C. A. today at 4 o'clock at l ical and Radical-Socialist party at the
to comply with the request of the soph- Newberry hall. Bordeaux congress, as that prty is the
o011 res that they wear ankle length First interclass basketball prac- most strongly opposed of all the part-
skhrts on iuesdays led to a civil war tices will be held today, juniors and jes to the entrance of women in pol-
lw',ecn the two classes. The out- seniors come at 4 o'clock, sophomores itics.
fo-- of the contrast is difficult to pre- and freshmen at 5 o'clock.
(Iht as it is the first and only one ever Second tryouts for Junior Girls' play Vienna now has her first woman
sta'ed by freshman women at Whit- will be held today from 4 to 6 o'clock taxi driver who gained her place only
m'. in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. by overcoming serious opposition.

CLEARANCE

Sport
Frocks
The sort of frock you have1
the comfortable little in-betw
Jersey, tweed, twill and home
models with pleats, noveltyl
In one and two color combi

HALF PRICE SALE

Barters
Purses
Beaded Bags

Ear-rings
Necklaces
Bath Halts

Sweaters
]ose
Ties

~i
t7
I.
been wanting all season,
peen frock of woo1 crepe,
spun. One and two-piece
belts and new necklines.
nations. All reduced for
5 - $15.75
$25.00
(}

These are only a few of the big values shown in our
HALF PRICE WINDOW. Play "Santy" to yourself
and buy that gift that you wished you'd get for Christmas.

THE RUBLEY SHOPPE
IN THE .ARCADE

immediate clearance.
$7.95 - $1
$19.75

10.7

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II

SGREETI.NG S

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Now Showing
Individual, Interesting,
Intriguing Spring
styles irl
- AT -

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To Our Customers

I1

Start the New. Year

by

PETITE FROCKE SHOPPE
'Otoite "1a "" Bu -~ l l

.7"10 ar SLnr~ tree- Near the Mt I.

Ph.,onle ,SO

I

employing the best laun-
dry service. Look your
best at all times. Have
your Dry Cleaning, Press-
ing and Laundering done
the cheapest and easiest
way.
Prompt service, economy
and quality are the things
that make our work pop-
ular.

T

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=Qoz

.d°. *°. E.d".c ..e '". ..X11": .d1Jdl "./J.0l.I"1.dY. ''°dd1. . ,r . .ors. .ors: . .rrrs. ,r. r~ .vr. . . .e .dss.e. .

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All high type Dresses, the kind that
one wears for daytime and evening
occasions. A splendid array of dis-
tinctive styles, perfect copies of Paris
originals.
MANY VALUES UP TO
$49.50
IN TWO SPLENDID GROUPS
AT
$14.75 and $22.50

Three Da
Clearance
of Frocks

11

- N, ~t

NOTE THE VALUE!
Jersey Dresses
6.95 -,$9.95
.11 e are dresses you'll want to have. Of "
Jersey in one or two-piece sport styles, in
i,ght and subdued shades trimmed with
contrast color, tailored buttons and belt.
Very useful for utility wear, for office,

III

V

LINGERIE

SILK UNDER WEAR
QUILTED ROBES

SCARFS
ULO USES
S WEA TERS

I

I

All One-fourth Off

-cnuol or street wear.
DRESSES-SECOND FLOOR

\IVIl

Dial 4287
II .4N IA ..*3 w

,. t{ 9

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