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December 15, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r VAGE SIX

THE MICHTIJGAN fDAILY

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 15. 192E

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CRTCAPTAIN OF WEAKENED DARTM6UTH ELEVEN RECEIVES PLAY EIGHT WESTERNERS HON4
RECOGNITION ON TEAM PICKED BY EASTERN COACHES MICIGAN WILLPIG WALTER CAMP IN
STRONG COMPETITION ININDOR NETMEET C Th mal-American seriie haith
SO'GATAE Eight western players, six of them the forwar
silorsa xectei To Give Wolverines CAIPET OF Coach Hutchins Announces That Two from the Big Ten, were selected on of[Stagg's
l rs td le In Friday' , ?3erGneee C A li OnWill Ent V ll.
~~*A k~lIUL .Viternl
'ida m o

ORED BY
1920 AND 1921
nner of end play bt c;i
oval more than 80 yards YA
d pass route. M\cGuire, ono
best tackles was the other
ian to gain a place in 1921

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Game At Field Horse
00STERRAAN REPORTS
Coach Mather's Wolverine basket-
ball team will meet some strong op-
position from the, invading Cornell
colrege five when the teams meet Fri-
day night at Yost field house, accord-
ing to early indications. The Cornell
squad, champion of the Mid-West Con-
ference last year, is made up of sev-
eral veterans, and promises to put up
a hard tussle.
Two forwards from the 1925-26
team, C. Johnson and Raymond, were
lost to Coach Dick Barker by grada-
tion, but Kasch, captain and forward
two years ago, has returned to shool
after a year's absence, and will fill
one of the vacancies. Muilenerg,
center, and Capt. R. Johnson, a run-
ning guard, have been the uts tand-
ing men on the team thus far. The
former led the conference in scoring
last year, and was named on its mythi-
cal all-star team.
Won 12 Games Last Year
This year he opened the season with
a fine performance in the Iowa State
Teacher's college game which Cornell'
von, 24-22.cDiekoff, a forward, Hord,
a substitute guard from last year,
Adamson, a football star playing his
first year of basketball from the for-
ward post, and Deemer, a secon pivot
man, seem to be the other leading
players on the invading squad. Al-
most all the men are tall, heavy and
fast.
Cornell won 12 of its 16 games dur-
ing the entire 1925-26 season of which
11 out of 12 battles were won from
Conference teams, Lawrence, Coe,
Ripon, Carleton, Hamlin, Knox, Mon-
mouth and Beloit. In this competi-
tion the Cornell five scored 30 points
or more in every game except the one
it lost.
Coach Dick Barker, former Michi-
gan wrestling coach, is now in charge
of tIe Cornell five, and this has added
interest to the visitors' invasion.
Martin Out With Injury
Coach Mather put the Varsity
through a aseriesof scrimmages in the
practice yesterday. Due to the
absence of the injured Martin from
the lineup, the men were shifted
about. In the first set, McCoy, at
center, Barley and Chambers, "for-
wards, and Petrie and Harrigan,
guards, made up one team, while
Schroeder, at the pivot positin,
Rasnick and Gawn, at the forward
berths, and Reason and Kunzel,
guards, made up the opposition.
Benny Oosterbaan, football captain-
elect, and basketball letterman from
last year, reported to the coach Mon-
day for practice, but it is doubtful if
he will be in shape for the game Fri-
day night.
After the Cornell college game, in
which the Skipper will be given an
'opportunity to test his new material
and juggle his combinations again, the
Wolverines will have two weeks to
prepare for the invasion of the Syra-
cuse quintet on New Year's Day.
Big Ten To Discuss
Decision Of Titles
In January Meetin
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Dec. 14- To decide
whether the Western Conference shall
become a "playing league" to the ex-
tent of arranging sport schedules to
determine championships, scholastic,
financial, alumni, and athletic leaders
of the Conference will meet late in
January.
Major John I. Griffith, athletic com-
missioner of the Big Ten annonuced
that the meeting was arranged at the
request of the football coaches and
athletic directors who drew up their
schedules for 1927 games three weeks
ago.
Three important problems are to be
presented to the assembly: Whether
the Conference is a "playing league,"
athletic schedules, and equality of
competition.

"A great many of the alumni," said
Major Griffith, "and also the public
are insisting that the Conference
should determine championships for-
mally each year, and with that in
mind are insisting that schedules be
arranged for that purpose.
"The question of rotating schedules,
simultaneous home and home games,
long term contracts, and intersec-
tional games will be some of the im-
portant matters coming before the
meeting.
"As it is necessary that two teams
competitg in a game shall observe one
code of playing rules, so that the Con-
ference authorities are agreed in the
interests of equal and fair competition,
it is further necessary that the 10
Conferencer universities resnect uni- 1

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i +e r;i ~~er t'rnet
Tennis Tourney
TO PRACTICEIN JANUARY
Definite announcement that Michi-
gan will be represented in the indoor
Vllegiate tennis meet, February 11
and 12, at Cornell was made yester-
day by Coach Henry C. Hutchins fol-
lowing the approval by the Athletic
association to the sending of two men
to Ithaca to take part in both singles
and doubles.
Practice will not begin until after
the holidays when all candidates will
meet in Waterman gymnasium for
daily workouts. There has been no
(definite squad picked because of the
Ilimited amount of weather suitable
for practice last fall.
The letter men back this season are
Olian and Stephens, and although
they have the advantage of Varsity
competition, they will be pressed to
ithe utmost for thetop places. Barton
and Moore of last year's freshman
team defeated the best the Varsity
had to offer at times last yehr both in,
singles and as a doubles team and are1
expected to make strong bids for regu-
lar positions later in the season if not
selected for the Eastern trip. Another
sophomore with possibilities of de-
veloping into a Varsity reg'hlar is
Algyer. Several A.M.A. imen from
?last year are also among those under
consideration including Toevs and
O'Brien. Nagel is an addition to the

Camp's ail-American teams of 1920 and
The south was represented by an ex-
1921. .Four of them were chosen each cellent end in Roberts of Center.
year and one of the men in 1921 was IThe teams selected are as follows:
a Michigan man, Ernie Vick, who won 1920
a place at center. Carney, Illinois, end; Keck, Prince-
In 1920, the western representation ton, tackle; Callahan, Yale, guard;
was led by George Gipp, Notre Dame's Stein, Pittsburgh, center; Woods, liar-
versatile fullback, who was one of the yard, guard; Scott, Wisconsin, tackle;
most outstanding performers of the Lourie, Princeton, quarter; Stinch-
year. Stinchcomb, "Chick"' Harley's comb, Ohio State, halfback; Way, Penn

t.

successor in the Ohio State football
sun, was a halfback choice. Scott,
Badger tackle, again brought Wiscon-
sin into the limelight, and "Chuck"
Carney, Illinois' greatest end and Zup-
pke's third all-American, won a place
at end. Other especially notable choic-
es on. the 1920 team were Stein, of
Pittsburgh, Callahan, Yale guard andj
star of the Big Three "football broth-!
ers" of that time, and Keck and Lourie,
tackle and quarterback respectively, at
Princeton..
Alongwith Ernie Vick in 1921, thel
Middle West had the outstanding back-
field star of the lear in Aubrey Devine,
of Iowa, who was named at quarter-
back. The Far West offered in "Brick"
Muller, of California, one of the great-
est ends of all time. Muller, who was
the Far West's first representative on
a Camp first team, was not only ad-ept
candidates who may serve as com-
petition.
No captain has been elected for the
1927 team as yet, but Coach Hutchins
expects to hold an election shortly
after the holidays.'

, State, halfback; Gipp, Notre Dlame,
fullback.
1921
Muller, California, end; Stein, Wash-
ington and Jefferson, tackle; Schwab,
Lafayette, guard; Vick, Michigan, cen-
ter; Brown, Harvard, guard; Mc-
Guire, Chicago, tackle; Roberts, Cen-
ter, end; A. Devine, Iowa, quarter;
Killinger, Penn State, halfback; Ald-
rich, Yale, halfback.
IOWA BASEBALL TEAM WILL
MEET SOUTHER=N OPPONENTS
IOWA CITY, Dec. 14.-University of
Iowa's baseball team will have the
advantage of a ┬žouthern training trip
' next spring. Coach Vogel will take
I his team on a five-day trip into Mis-
sissippi where they will engage three
of the best teams in the state.
Regular practice will begin directly
after the Christmas recess and eight
veterans froni last year's team will
report.
Subscribe for the 3lchligan Daily.

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DAP.TMOUTM
Led Trampled Green Warri'ors
Although the Big GreeD team of Dartmouth suffered a decided reactio n this year from their wonderful sea-
son of 1925 when, they were acclaimed national champions, Eddie' Dooley, except in the 24-23 loss to Cornell,
stamped himself as a truly great pilot.
Dartmouth lost all four of the big games on her 1926 schedule, with B rown, Harvard, Yale, and Cornell.
The teamm, was by no means the sam e as in 1925, when the great Oberlan der' and the flashy, Tully played on
the eleven.
Dooley's work this season earned the recognition of eastern critics, a nd he was named quarterback on the
second all-EasterA eleven selected by the coaches. Davis, center on the D artmouth squad, was given the center
berth on the second all-Eastern team. These two gridmen were the onl y Dartmouth players mentioned for
honors by critics, thus showing the lack of such performers as thos e who played on the 1925 team.

GT
IN' GI FT B OX E S

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On
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To you house committees
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