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December 14, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FADE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECE'MBrR 14, ? 9

FAG~2 sir TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 192~ I

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nr'HUDDLE' SYSTEM MAY BE USEDA0M| \A\ll
YEARLING LAGL SQUAD BY SEVERAL BASKETBALL TEAMS CAEGIEN SHOW WELL
CUT BY COACH FISHER -IN OPENING CONTEST'

Exec icnt Porward Material 1Devel-
oped; '1 3any Former High School
Stars On FreshmenI Rost er
30 ASPIRANTS SURVIVE
Two heavy slashes by, Coach Ray
Fisher have cut the number of men
on the roster of the yearling basket-
ball squad from more than 60 to ex-
actly 30 candidates.
Incidental with the reduction of the
number of men has come a more in-
tense drilling, resulting in the de-
velopment of several good forwards,
the lack of which was so outstanding
only a week ago.
Balsamo, Bowerman, Bovard, Han-
na, Hushen, Kanitz, Myron, Rimes,
Smith, and Russick are the remaining
aspirants for the forward berths on
the freshman quintet. Of this group
there seems to be little to choose, ex-
cept that some of the candidates have
received recognition in high school.
Foremost among these is Myron, of
Mt. Clemens, an almost unanimous
choice for all-state honors last year
and Balsamo, of Chicago, the dim-
inutive all-city selection. Many othersI
have gained recognition in other
cities, Bowerman, of Ishpeming, Bo-
vard and Hanna, of Ann Arbor, Ka-
nitz, of Milan, Hushen, of Detroit,
Smith, of Adrian, and Rimes, of Chi-
cago.
Coach Fisher has been drilling the
men in the fundamentals of tne sport
since the squad was transferred to
Yost field house two weeks ago. Pass.
ing, executing of short shots, drib-
bling and pivoting have formed the
greater part of the practice sessions
for the forwards.
Among the centers Taylor, Ann Ar-
bor, Magran, Chicago, McAfree, Sioux
City, and Raber, Grand Rapids have
put in strong bids for the pivot posi-
tion. Taylor is well known to local
fans for his brilliant work in the last
all-state tournament in February, held
in Waterman gymnasium, along with
Hanna and Bovard, forwards, also of
Annl Arbor.
Coach Fisher will work the men
from now on in combinations to find
the best players, and give the men
the much needed experience. Although
many of the men have played on high
school teams, they have not been
drilled in Coach Fisher's style of play,
and seem "lost on the floor."

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Mlather C alls Satunrda y's (i ince
Fsar Bel er Than Op%)ener 1
1ast. Seasonj

TO PLAY CORNELL NEXT

The "huddle" system' employed of recent years in football, may be
taken up by several basketball teams this season, judging from the recent
report from Princeton that the Tigers may take it up. Plays from the toss-
up will be worked out after each basket, as well as defensive tactics. The
photo shows the Princeton five in a huddle.
Wrestlers Will Return To School Early
After Vacation To Prepare For Meets
Varsity wrestlers will- return to Naglekirk as leading contenders..
IWatson, a letter man, Durant, anid
school on Dec. 28 to resume their.Watso wltemst Durnsang
training for the coming season which Wolfe show the most promising
opes wth theedaytri toIow iamong the 135 pounders. In the 145
opens with a three day trip to Iowa pound class there is a close contest
beginning Jan. 15, when the Wolver,pudcas hr sacls ots
beginin Jan 15 whn th Woverbetween Galsterer, of last year's Vat-
ines engage Cornell college, and Iowa sity, Sauer, the present all-campus
State Teachers college, both of whom champion, and Warren of last year's
boast powerful teams. freshman team.
The men are rapidly rounding into eCaptain Donahoe leads the 158
shape and by the time the ~ season 1 pound candidates with Soutl~vorth
opens they will be in the best of con-I showing considerable promise as his
dition. Baker, captain of the 1925 !understudy. In the 175 pound class
team, Kailes, all-campus champion Rich, letter man of last year, Hager,
for this year, and Bruce are the out, all-campus title holder, and Johnson.
standing 115 pounders. Solomon, a Prescott, all-campus champion, Pal-
letter man, heads the list in the 125 mneroli, and Smith appear to be the
pound division with Ulasick and h etan t +ea uevemaizht

Michigan's basketball team showed I
far better form in defeating Michigan
State Saturday night than it displayed
in the first game of the season last
year, in the opinion of Coach Mather.
However, the team has a long way toj
go before it can be considered a
championship contender, he added. t
It was on the defense that the
Wolverines showed to best advantage
against the upstate team. According
to the chart of the game, the State
players had the opening for only seven1
shots from within the 17 foot mark
during the entire game.j
Although the score was high, the
Michigan offense showed great weak-
ness, according to Coach Mather. This1
was especially true of the work close
to the basket. Basket shooting was
below par on several occasions, Ny-
land and Chambers both missing a
few. Harrigan took it easy in the
first half and scarcely attempted to
shoot until the second period when he
ran up five baskets.
The next game for the Wolverines
will be played Friday night in the field
house with Cornell college, coached
by Dick Barker, former wrestling
coach here. Cornell had the chamui
on five of the Midwest Conference last
season and though little is known of
it this year, it is understood that the
team is intact, except for one guardS
who was lost by graduation.
After the game with Cornell, thej
Wolverine squad will disband for the
holidays but will return early, re-
porting for pradtice the morning of
Dec. 27. From then on through the
holidays there will be two practices
daily, one in the morning and the
other after lunch. On Jan. 1, Syra-
cuse will invade the field house for a;
game"and the University of Maryland'
will play here Jan. 4. The first Con-
ference. game here is with Illinois
E Jan. 17.
This list of candidates includes let-
ter men from last year's team in every,
class except the heavyweight.-
The Boston Athletic association in-
door sports carnival will be held in
the new Boston arena, Feb. 5, 1927.

Expect Rules Body
To Settle Probleml
About Extra Point'
With great objections being raised
this year over the system of scoring
the extra point after touchdown, the
rules committee will receive many
suggestions when it convenes this
winter in.NewYork city for its an-
nual meeting.
The agitation for. a ,change in the
rule has come to a climax as a result
of the games lost during the 1926 year
by a single point. In many cases the
more powerful eleven was defeated I
simply because the coaches had layed
little stress on developing a man who
could boot the ball consistently be-
tween the uprights from the 10 yard
line.
Meanwhile, with the discussion in-
creasing daily, some plans have been
advanced to eliminate the kick, but
this involves a danger of too many
tie games, and many officials now
favor a new plan by which the ball
will be put in play on the opponents'
10 yard line after a touchdown, and
the scoring team will be allowed four
plays in which to put the ball over,
either by line rushing, forward pass,
ing, or place kicking.
This plan is decidedly an advantage
to the better team. Obviously, a team,
lacking a reliable kicker cannot try
the place kick for the extra score,
while other teams will not be affected'
by this rule. On the other hand, a
strong offensive team will mostalikely'
be able to put the ball over, while a
weak eleven will most likely have lit-
tle success. Those who favor this
plan maintain that this would alsoI
eliminate to a small extent the possi-
bility of a team scoring on a break
and then making the extra point to
win a game.
This point came up at the meeting
of the Western Conference officials in
Chicago and was hailed by many
coaches as the best plan 'submitted.
If the suggestion is carried, more
football will be played as there will
be a four plays in which to gain the
one point, while teams will be given
an opportunity to show their tricks
plays and defensive strength respec-
tively.
In addition to this suggested rule,
Maj. John L. Griffith, Western Con-
ference athletic commissioner, is plan-
ning to submit to the committee the
various problems which have arisen
in the Big Ten games.
IOWA CITY.-Emerson W. Nelson,
right tackle, has been selected to
captain the 1927 Iowa football team.

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OPPOSE LANDIS SALARY INCREASE
(Br Assoclated Press) ( Althou i the magnates unanimously
INEW YORK, Dec. 13.-A proposed favor reelection of Landis to anther
salary increase of $10,000 for Baseball
Commissioner Landis was received term of seven years they indictd
without enthusiasm today by National today that the circuit will oppose a
League club owners. move to boost his salary to $60,000.

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Mr. Louis K. Anspacher
America's Distinguished Dramatist-Orator
Presents
"The Mob and the Movies"
Hill Auditorium
Thursday, Dec. 16, at 8 P. M,
Mr. Anspacher is a well known writer of both prose and
poetical drama, and is recognized as the leading authority on
the importance of dramatic literature. He is without question
the finest orator in America today. Don't fail to hear this
fine speaker.
Reserved Seats, $1.00
General Admission, 50c
Tickets at Slater's.

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DEL PRETE COLLEGIATE CLOTHES SHOP
Give Him Something Wearable for Christmas

GIFTS

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for His Christmas
Give Him Shirts

CHRISTMAS
GIFTS

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Particularly fine are some new
imported white broadcloth shirts
by Arrow-Collar, atttached or
neckband-$2.50 to $5.00.
$35 Suits and Overcoats .... $28

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1. SHIRTS
The Very Newest

Pre-Vacation Discounts
FUR COATS AND
FUR JACKETS-
Our sale of these continues at
exceptional discounts.
SHIRTS-
Several patterns in blue stripes
$2.50, $3.00 and $3.50 at$1.95.
HOSIERY
Imported Wool in the light, medium'
and heavy weights 25% off
NECKWEAR-

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Give Him Neckwear
The unfailing good taste which'
characterizes our neckwear assort-
ment is assurance that your selec-
tion will be correct-$1 to $5.
$40 Suis and Overcoats .. .$32

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Give Him Gloves

2. NECKWEAR

The Latest

3. WOOL HOSIERY
Fine Imported Qualities
4. SILK MUFFLERS
White and Fancy Patterns
5. DRESSING GOWNS
The New Silk Stripes
6. HANDKERCHIEFS
Imported Creations from Paris
..,; 11 XY17 AD +lL-----.L :fl1£.~

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Cloves of assured correctness for
street or motor-Capes mochos,
bucks-Lined and Unlined-$2
to $6.50.
Pig skins are very popular, $5
$45 Suits and Overcoats....$36

A good choice of color and
patterns at

95c

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SPORT JACKETS
AND SWEATERS-
A few good numbers left at25% off
Many exceptional gifts in Mark Cross leather goods as
well as neckwear, hosiery and gloves.

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Give Him Mufflers
Men's Silk Squares, handsome
silk knit reefers; gorgeous Rayon
conceits; smart Cashmeres-$2
to $6.
And a Host of Other Articles

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$60 Suits and Overcoats

$40

Of course you want to look your best when you get home.
A suit or an overcoat from Del Prete at 20% discount will

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help you a

long ways-You save enough for the fare home

V:11

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