100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 09, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

PACE 'FOUR.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DTCEMBERI f, 19:6

________I

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Pls is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwisej
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein,
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
tiard Street.
M'ones: Editorial, 4925; business 214r4.

or by the possible obstinacy of Con-
gress. With the responsibility left
to that body, however, it is more than
probable that it will accomplish some-
thing.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor...............W. Calvin PattersonI
City Editor.............. .Irwin A. Olian
.Frederick Shillito
NewsEditors........ Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor........... Marion Kubik
Sports Editor.............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor.............Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles 1Behymet Ellis Merry
Carton Champe Stanferd N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. smith
James herald C.ssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnan
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters
Mario'n Anderson Paul Kern
Alex Bochnowski Miles Kimball
Jean Cnnjphell Mil tonKirshoamn
Clarence Edelson Rich'ard Kurvink.
Chester E. Clark G. 1Thomas McKean
Earl W. De La VergneKenneth Patrick
WViliam k ioerv Morris Quinn'
Alfred Lee Faoster Jamre5 Sheehan
Robert .1inchr aelson J. Smith, Jr.
Johrn Frieud Sylvia Stone'C
3ober t'es sner Wiliiam Thurnau
Elaine (r 'her Milford Vanik
L'.olemi- J. Glencer Herbert E.Vedder
lHlarvey J. Gundersonr Marian Welles"
Stewart H ooker Thaddeuis Wasielewski
Morton 73. [cove. Sherwvood Winslow

1

Ii
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising...............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising..........George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation........... .....Kenneth haven
Publication.............. john H. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistantst

George Ahn Jr.
Melvin II. Baer
1). M. Brown
M. 11. Cai
FlorenceCooper
D)aniel Finley
B. H. Handley
A. Al. Hinkley
E. L. I:lulse
S. Kerbawy r
V. A. Mvleyer
Tlarvf y Rosenbhlum
William F. Spencer
Harvey Talcott

Harold Utley
L. J. Van Tuyl
J. B. Wood
Esther Booze
Iilda Binzer
1 orothy Carpenter
Marion A. Daniel
l eatrice Greenberg
Selmia M. Janson
Marion IDerr
Nfarion L. Reading
Hlarriet C. Smith
Nance Somon
Florence Widmaier

INEFFECTUAL AMERICANS '
The obvious failure of the second
annual conference of the National Stu-
dent Federation of America to ac-
complish anything constructive in the
way of bettering conditions in the
American colleges points clearly to
one fact that the American college
student has not reached the point
where he can comprehend his own
problems and furnish concrete rem-
edies for the ills of student life.
The general tone'of the recent con-
gress was one of extreme conserva-
tism, utmost smugness, complacency,
and "laissez-faire." The "rah, rah!
college patriotism" which i an integ-
ral part of our educational system has
blinded the American student to the
problems of higher education. The1
Alma Mater, by virtue of being the
Alma Mater, evidently becomes right
in its methods of student government
and curriculum in proportion to the
number of football games it wins.
In short, the American student has
not discovered his own potentialities
as afi individual. The teacher-proctor
system has too long' been in vogue
to permit the "teachered" and the
"proctored" to realize that the college
cannot exist without them. American
students, being less mature than
Europeans, assume a less important
place i- the educational life of their
country. They are ineffectually rather
than intellectually curious. Many
changes and much development must
follow before the conceit and hollow
patriotism of the unthinking American
will assume a position of importance
and progress.
NO ALIBIS
Contrary to the opinion of the Pres-
ident, as expressed in his message to
Congress, the military and naval de-
fenses of thecountry are not what
they should be, either in numbers or
in strength. Although the President
declared that no navy in the world
surpasses our own, that our land and
sea forces are well trained for service,
and that the total forces number
about 610,000, these statements are
true only on paper.
The Navy's ship and dirigible build-
ing program is being held up, sup-
posedly for lack of funds; the actual
net strength of the army is about
112,000, instead of the 118,000 pro-
vided by Congress, and included in the
President's "permanent forces" are
some 110,000 members of the Reserve
Officers' Training corps and 34,000 col-
lege and high school boys of the
Citizens Military Training camps. The
size of our armed forces of defense
Iis not excessive beyond our needs.
There is utterly no alibi why they
should not .be maintained in fightin
trim with their ranks filled by ex-
perienced, trained men.
STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
The Student countil, as sponsor of
the plan for the membership of three
students in the Administrative Board
of the literary college when trying
cases of student discipline, should re-
ceive the gratitude of the student
body . The new plan, adopted yester-
day, provides that two men and one
woman shall become members of the
board when trying student cases.
While no one may contend that the
board has failed to give students fair
treatment in the past, the new plan
will provide more opportunity for the
expression and application of the stu-
dent viewpoint in handling discipline
cases and will show students how the
cases are actually handled.

HONEST, GOVERNMENT
It is suspected that someone was
dishonest in the Department of the
Interior several years ago. Several
gentlemen of prominence have been
arrested, for there are some people
who still think that it is a crime for a

E OLL
CLIPP
IN THE
OPERA
Why Clippy left home is at last dis-
covered. She had a part in the Opera,
and had to rehearse with the company.
As ft is one of the surprises of the I
show, she couldn't very well tell1
about it beforehand.
* * *sI
"I am glad that my absence has e
been explained," Clippy told a ROLLS
reporter after the performance last
night. "I hated to leave home but ita
would Biever have done to let this
secret out before the show opened."
. .
Clippy has just the part you would
expect a shy and undemonstrative
Terrier to play. She never appearsl
in public during the show, but rather1
is made the subject of a hunt, and
an accompanying song by the Coun-
tess, Baron and Painter.
* *.
Incidently, ClIppy is the first female1
to play in a Mimes production.
LITTLE GIRL'S PETt
Now it's a Norwegian Puppy that
looks like a polie pup and has lop
ears, pointed nose and tan color, and 1
is a little girl's pet. And it's adver-
tised in the Lost column.
Hilda is making a bid for the fame
Clippy won. Maybe she went on the
stage, too. If she doesn't look out 1
they will arrest her for impersonating
a policeman.
* * *
Rolls' Lost Dog department offers
its usual reward of 10,000,000 German
marks for information leading to the
recovery of this dog. So far our rec-
ord has been 100 per cent. Nobody
has claimed the reward.
Browstark
CHAPTER 7
The army of Arboria marched down
the main street shooting off tear gas
right and left. And they formed in
solid ranks about the Parkade Audi-
torium.
Now it so happened that this build-
ing was looked upon by the citizens
of Browstark as their very own, for
through a struggle of several years
the owner had managed to build this
mammoth hall, mostly paid for out
of contributions of the Browstarkians.
And it was here they were ac-
customed to go when they wished to
celebrate a national holiday. Today
they marched happily through the
streets, little realizing that their na-
tion had been invaded.
They rushed up to the Auditorium,
cheering and singing. But as they
approached the doors, they were wel-
comed by tear gas and machine guns.
Indignation ran high in the ranks
of the Browstark citizens, but what
could they, a civilized people, do
against the strong military machine
from the neighboring nation?
"It's war," thought J. Paul-Univer-
sity, our hero, as he surveyed the un-

even fight. An just then, what should
he see but the Princess Collie, driving
up in her carriage. She had come to
celebrate with her people, but she re-
mained to....
(Continued In Our Next) f
* * *
SIDEWALKS
There seems to be some mistaken
impression on the campus. It really
wasn't that the B. and G. boys were
kind enough to spread sand on the
walks to keep us upright and steady.

MUSIC
ADRAMA

TONIGHT: The Mimes of the
Nichigan Union present the fourth
performance of their twety-first an-
nual opera, "Front Page Stuff" in the
Whitney theater at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *
TONIGHT: The Normal College
choir, under the direction of Frederick
Alexander, will present a program of
Christmas music in Pease auditorium
at 8 o'clock.
"FRONT PAGE STUFF"
A Review by 3Iarian Welles
"Cotton Stockings" will be remem-
bered for its Lionel Ames, "Tam-
bourine" for its picturesqueness and
vivid colors, and "Front Page Stuff"
will no doubt be entered on the book
of time as a perfectly trained danc-
ing revue. The piquant ballet culmi-
nating in the toe-dancing of William
Lewis and the coruscating, fantastical
whirl of Thomas Dougal are portions
of this year's opera which will not be
reproduced immediately.
Being an annual production, the
Michigan Union Opera has by frequent
repetition rubbed quite bare the fa-
miliar patterns of the musical comedy
composition. Local color is local
color and is difficult to obtain in any
wealth of original ways. Aside from
the dancing, the book of "Front Page
Stuff" is a distinct improvement over
last year's. There are more humorous
situations, better lines, and althoug
there is still some mere word fencing
the work as a whole has more sig.
nificance than heretofore. With a
better book and better dapcin
"Front Page Stuff" should be the mos
smashing success of opera history-
but it decidedly isanot.
The choruses are tacked on th
show for one thing, and the cast
parts, although adequately taken ar
not superbly filled, for another
Donald Lyons as the professor, an
Russell Gohring as the leading man
exhibit more real dramatic feelin
than any oher members of the caste
Richard Lutes, the scintillating count
ess made of a common cook, is a rea
comedy character. But the part i
not new to him, although it contains
wider range than his role in "Tam
bourine."
"Our prettiest girls are men"-yes
the protean strength of some of th
maidens in the opening chorus mak
their identity with the stronger se
unmistakable. There were severa
things about that chorus that woul
bear improvement,'such as shortenin
the skirts of the fair ones and rubbin
a few ounces of grease paint fron
their roseate cheeks.
It is perhaps a bit unfair to pay s
much attention to detail in consider
ing such a big production as the oper
and yet it is only by paying attentio
to these distracting details that "Frot
Page Stuff" will be whipped int
shape to take on the road. Again th
old story of the chain and the weakes
link.
It is possible, however, to bury th
real merits of a production under
mass of derogatory incidents-so i
the final analysis we must add tha
"Front Page Stuff" is characterize
by fine chorus work, exceptional danc
ing, a versatile leading lady, som
beautiful show girls, but exhibits
certain lack of coordination betweer
parts of the show and a neglect of de
tail, which detract from the spon
taniety and finesse which should ac
company such a production.
THE DETROIT SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Under the prodigal baton of Ossii

Gabrilowitsch, the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra will present a program ir
the Choral Union series in Hill audi-
torium on Monday evening at 8
o'ciock. This will mark the orches-

For
ChristmasGifts
r GR§4HA}'IS
Open Evenings until Christmas At both ends of the Diagonal
RI&)ER SERVICE
ro
would make a wonderful
wr4
A first pay nent of $1O would
help a los Git.sugsit
Gr -
OndersC Pen shon
RIDER SERVICE

TiHURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 19261
Night Editor---CHAS. E. BEHYMER
THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE !
Prer:id^nt Coolidge, in advising Con-
gress "on the state of the Union" and
on needed legislative measures, for-f
warded a very able and complete
message which was generally well re-
ceived by the individual Senators and
Reprc -se tatives. Though ignoring the
World court and the question of cam-
paign expenditures, the communica-
tion was rtainly an amplified restate-
ment of previously announced policies.
Evidently not aftected by the criti-
cism of his tax reiate plan, the Pres-
ident reiterated his support of it asI
the only sound means of tax relief
no wavailable. On the farm aid ques-
tion, he declared the attitude of the
administration to be a friendly one, as
evinced by the enactment of nine
measures in the last five years, for
the benefit of agriculture. Striking
directly at the McNary-Haugen bill,
however, he warned against "putting
the government in the business of
(farm)production, marketing, or price
fixing."
In treating the bituininous coal sit-
uation, the President explained that;
the present wage scale agreement will
expire next April with the chief exe-
cutive powerless to interefere in any
crisis which might result. His definite
request for legislation enabling theI
President to handle such a difficulty
should recive congressional action
before adjournment on March 4.

a
9
t
e
e
e
r.
d
1,
9
Il
s
a
e
e
x
A
d
9
0If
wtf
oI
1

I

PLE
MAKE
PATHE
CAMU

-~_
ayhie e~ & ary.Soo00 foi ci I'
I~rli i~l l rR sp' a y V
-GUY WOO LFO_*LK
& O.
asts amd Paterns exclusive ovr ownl des n
W HIT E HOUSEF & HA
INCOR ORT ED
BROADWAY AT 40T1I"STREET 144 WEST 42ND F
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE BLDG. KNICKERBOCKER 1f
84 BROADWAY-AT WAL. STREET -

I

t'.

READ THE WT A

i

l '
;
-,j .c ;

' f
f
f
CBS
i

low V

Fm;,;

1
r
i
r
I
C
i
i
C
i
f
I
l
,,
I
I
f

#9'

LT'S the way P. A. talks t you in the bowl
pipe. This great national gloom-chaser
the darkest clouds with a ray of sunshine.
a tidy red tin of Prince Albert today and
Tamp a load of' this friendly tobacco into
q1I
jimmy-pipe and light up.
)ol as a sub-cellar0 Sweet as the breath of
- .,.
-cut violets. Fragrant in the tin and fra-
as you smoke it. Never a tongue-bite or
h" P
kTIS the way.PA..italks doeyurinwthe bowl
oat-parch. So mild you Can hit it up from tiyedinpndadhlf
p sun-down, eti that satisfies poundcrystallg
tnd always with every bi
aete y . sde Pne A lbr prce ss.
iere's more philosophy in a pipe-load of
an in the average Doctor's thesis. No
r what brand you are smoking ow, you
now ow much your jimmy-pipe Can
to you until you pac it with good old i.s,/Ii'
t Albert, Get started now.r

nnlitioian i-n ho riiclinnpct and

a-t

In all,' practically, every question i iJci o 'U = "a1UinonL, anU aL
of public interest was treated by the present these gentlemen are being
message. Both national defense and tried on the charges.
the tariff were regarded as satisfact- The facts have been proved; there
ory for the general welfare. Illegal is no doubt about them. Some one*
disregard for the prohibition amend- (did cheat the government. The gentle-
ment or any other part of the consti- ' men now on trial claim that it was
tution was denounced as injurious to not they, although they admit that
the "American system- of ordered someone did it. Pointing an accusing
liberty." Those who dislike any con- finger at Denby and others they look
stitutienal provision or law should very, very innocent and say that they
confine their opposition to legal could never have done such a thing.
means, it was stated. This is not the significant point, how-
At the outset of his message, Mr. ever. The salient fact is that some-
Coolidge conceded that no great I one was dishonest in the government
amount of legislation will be possible somewhere. Whether it be Doheny,I
in the present short session. Very Fall, Denby, or what-not doesn't mat-
wisely, from bath a political and psy- ter. The government of the United
choigi ca standpoint, he stressed the States is far too important to be al-
enactment of only a few measures, lowed to slip into the hands of dis-
and made himself responsible for theI honest men. Citizens can change the
success of none Rather, e defined situation by demanding higher qual-
,,_ i if«" nn.-. 4if.is4PimaI.., 4,fh a r ifn li

* tra's first appearance in Ann Arbor
What happened was that they were for the season, and at present this is
carting off a few loads of sand from the only scheduled performance.
their sand mine over near the Psy- During the 13 years of its existence,
chology building and some of it got 1 the Detroit Symphony orchestra has
spilt. ' done much toward establishing what-
* * ever reputation Detroit may have as a
AS IT STANDS NOW musical center. With Mr. Gabrilo-
This. Soph Prom grand march witsch, as director, the organization
changes leaders faster than Ann Ar- has grown into a musical combination
bor does its weather. But at last that compares favorably with those of
they have established the precedent Walter Damrosch and Leopold Sto-
that the chairman of the affair lead kowski. Mr. Gabrilowitsch is him-
the big parade, self one of the most famous pianists
* * * in the country, and the orchestra can
-SWIM AT STADIUM rely on him as a soloist of more than
LAKE TILLOTSON, Dec. 8.-Swim- passing ability.
ming will replace football in the new At present the orchestra is in the
stadium next year, ROLLS Board in east and has been attended by un-

THA
of a
stabs
Buy
see.
your
Cc
fresh
grant
a thr
Sun-u
comp
TI
P. A.
matte
don't
mean
Princ

t

;. I

Control of Athletics has decided.i
Aquatic football is thought to be im-
practical, although it has been done I

usually favorable criticism. Mr.
Gabrilowitsch has been exceedingly
successful in such tours, and his pro-

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan