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November 27, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEATIII'R 27, 1 {;

TIX IIHA AL AUDY OEBR2,12

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RECORD CROWD W LL E ARMYANAVY BATTLE TI

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MONTANA ELEVEN BOASTS VARIETY

II flTEDTILAL TilT 'ARMY AND NAVY COACHES PLAYED ON
U LSERVICE TEAMS IN FORVtER YEARS
TAfun Prionii TAhl

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IIUtL~U )MU IUHAT
Four intersectional battles will
close the 1926 football season this
afternoon. With the completion of
Thursday's handful of gridiron con-
tests, the present season drew a step
nearer to the close that will be defi-
nitely marked by today's games.
Aside from the important game be-
tween Army and Navy at Soldier's
field in Chicago, Notre Dame, perhaps
the most powerful eleven in the coun'
try, will engage Carnegie Tech. With
the game with Southern California
only a week away, Rockne and 35
Notre Dame players journeyed to
Pittsburgh, determined to throw full
strength into the opening lineup in
order to win. The Rocknemen hold
impressive records over Bbloit, Minne-
sota, Penn State, Northwestern,
Georgia Tech, Indiana, Army and
Drake, and victory in the two remain-
ing games will increase their chances
for national title.
Iowa State plays the Southern
branch of the University of California I
in the third important intersectional
battle of the day at Los Angeles. The
Iowa team is one of the strongest in
the Missouri Valley Conference and
is expected to give the Californians
plenty of opposition.
The last intersectional game will
take place between University of °Dg-
troit and Georgetown university at De-
troit. Georgetown holds victories
over Pittsburgh, Washington college,
West Virginia, Syracuse and several
others and has lost only one game,
that was a 10-7 defeat at the hands
of the Navy.

Both the coaches of Army and
Navy football teans made reputations
as players at the institutions whose
teams they are now coaching. "Biff"
Jones, mentor of te Cadet team,
learned football under Charley Daly
andl "Pot" (Graves at West Point in
1915 and 1916, and for eight years
after his graduation he remained
there as assistant coach.
Elevated to the position of head
coach at the resignation of Captain
McEwan last season, Jones has inocu-
lated his team with the driving spirit
that characterized his play while a-
star tackle on the Cadet eleven inJ
1916. Except for the 7-0 setback atf
the hands of Notre Dame, the West
Point team has vanquished every op-)
ponent sq far this season.
"Navy Bill" Ingram is recognized
as one of the greatest football players
ever turned out at Annapolis. He
starred for three seasons on Middy

teams at end and quarterback posi-
tions and was named for the quarter-
hack post on Walter Camp's all-
American team during his last season.
After his graduation Ingram joined
the Pacific fleet and became coach of
the Pacific fleet aggregation, and
played on the eleven which Vncountler-
ed some of the leading teams on the
1 western coast. At the close of th .
war Ingrain resigned from the Navy
and accepted a position as football
coach at the University of Indiana.
A little more than a year ago Ingram
was offered the directorship of the
Navy eleven and promptly accepted it.
Not unlike his rival at West PIint,
Navy Bill" ieeded only a year at
Annapolis to put his team- up in front
with the leaders. Facing one of the
hardest'schedulds in the history of the
Academy, Ingram has piloted his team
to six victories.

-t.

DANCING EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT

Unavoidable Postponement of the

Montana university's powerful foot-
ball eleven boasts two "half pint"
halfbacks who, jncidentally, are twins.,
[They are Bill and Ted Hodges. Their1
size is indicated graphically in the
STAGGGIVES C'S
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Nov. 26.-Coach A. A.
Stagg of the University of Chicago is
giving 20 varsity letters to his ma-
roons, who understood they might not
receive monograms this fall because
they lost every Western Conference
game.
As an additional reward "the old
man," completing his thirty-third year
as Chicago coach, is taking 25 of the
squad to the Army-Navy encounter.
PITTSBURGH.-The city council!
has approved 'a memorial to the late
Harry Greb, former world's middle-
weight chandpion, with some dissent.}
Subscribe for The Michigan Daily.

photo above, which shows them be-
ing "mothered" under the wings of
Lou Vierhus, giant tackle on the same
team. Vierhus tips the scales at 220
pounds.
Needless to say, this unusual combi-
nation of football talent causes great
mirth to the spectators who witness
the Montana team in action. The
twins form a speedy pair of halfbacks
and Vierhus is a wealth of power on.
the line. ,

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OR

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T;mCIESYSTEMWCLOT~ms
QrOYQun Men3,'AUage$
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Corner Fifth and Ann Streets
A place where respectable dancing can
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plan-Where the Music will be of the
Best-And where Pep Predominates.
"JOE" BURROUGH'S TROUBADORS
For Engagements, Call Burroughs-

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man.
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OXFORD

GREYS

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These latest Woolens are being
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QUALITIES

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Imported and Domestic

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The Cambridge
OUR OVERCOATS, made for us by
SCH1BYER, America's finest tailor,
reflect the prevailing vogue in fine clothes
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