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November 23, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-23

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY '

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1926

.__-_- _ __ 11111 i aiv

.- .. I - --- - III III I== m I wmuww*ommmw

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Pfess is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all. news
dispatches creditedto it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mastsr General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75 ; by mail,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May- 1
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor.................W. Calvin Patterson
City IEditor.................. Irwin A. Olian
News Etor............. jFrederick Shillito
News Edlitors............. fPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editor...............Marion Kubik
S'ports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegra di l6aitor............Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors

Charles lBehymet Ellis Merry
Carlton (hampe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlilt Courtland C. Smith
James Herald CUssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters
Marlon Anderson Miles Kimball
Alex llochnowski Miitun Kirshuaum
Jean Cimpbel Eichard Kurvink.
larence idelson G. Thomas McKean
William Emerv Adeline O'Brien
Afired Lee Foster Kenneth Patrick
kobert E. Finch Morris Quinn
john f'riend James Sheehan
jtobert Geisner N. J. Smith
1;i inc Gruber Sylvia Stone
clean.. J. Glencer William Thurnau
Hlarvey J. (Gunderson Milford Vanik
Sewart ilooker Herbert Vedder
Morton B. icove Marian Welles
Paul Kern Thaddeus Wasielewski
.rvin La Rowe Sherwood Winslow

Zealand. These units have felt that
the right was theirs alone to take the
immigrants they wanted instead of
those England chose to send overseas.
They have gained somewhat of a mor-
al victory over the home government
by the adoption of the plan, being as
it is, a distinct concession.
The only objection to the plan is
that the home government will have
difficulty in finding work for the hun-
dred thousand coal miners who will
be unemployed even after the settle-
ment of the strike. On the other hand
the Dominions certainly ought to have
the right to determine for themselves
who shall become their citizens, what
type immigrants they should be, and
how they should be selected. It is a
sensible decision on the part of the I
Conference and a wise concession of
the British home government.
DELAY INTERVENTION
Although intervention of the United
States in Nicaraguan affairs, similar
to that in Cuba, which has been de-
scribed by George W. Wickersham as
the move necessary to secure peace in
that country, may be the government's
ultimate action, a milder policy seems
better adapted to present circum-
stances.
For the 11 years previous to last
August when its marines last landed
there, this country has actively pro-
tected American interests and has
helped to establish order in Nicaragua.
With Mexico involved by the charges
of President Diaz thattherebels op-
posing his government are securing
aid within Mexican boundaries, how-
ever, the situation is much more deli-
cate than that apparent in the usual
case of intervention. As may be rea-
soned from our own difficulty in pre-
venting the organization of expedi-
tions on this side of the Rio Grande
against the Calles government, Mex-
ico is probably not connected with
supplying aid to the Nicaraguan
rebels.
In dealing with the situation, the
state department has wisely inter-
preted the appeal of President Diaz
for intervention as a mere request for
good offices. For the present, at least,
the policy of using our naval and ma-
rine forces only for the protection of
American interests seems quite proper.

v Cr -ri i

c

41 ". 1- . I- - -

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephony 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED, JR.
Advertising......... .Paul W A.d
Advertising........William C. Pusch
Advertisit'g...... ......Thomas Sunderland
rAdvertising....... .George 11. Annable, Jr.
Circulation...........T. Kenneth Haven
Publication........... ...John H. Bobrink
Accounts..............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr. L. J. Van Tuy l
Melvin Ii. Baer s. B. Wood
1). M. Brown Esther Booze
M. 11. Cait Hlilda Binzer
Daniel Finley Dorothy Carpenter
B.1 H. Handley Marion A. Daniel
A.-M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Iulse Selma M. Janson
S. 'Kerbawy Marion Kerr
R. A. Meyer . Marion L. Reading
Harvey Rosenblum Harriet C. Smith
William F. Spencer Nance Solomon
Harvey Talcott Florence Widmaier
Harold Utley

T OASTED ROLLS-On
R OWNL
5, FOOTBALL
PLAN
President Little has voiced his ap-
proval of the plan to have simultape-
>us home and home football games
in the Conference. We ordinarily
upport him in all announcements of
University holidays and any request
o townspeople to stay away from the
convocations, but we can't agree on
this matter. It's too bad he didn't ask
is for our opinion before he decided.
* * *
But with the slight changes to be
listed herewith we think the plan
ought to work. First of. all the prin-
ciple involved seems to. be that by
simultaneous games the schools would
save the time of students and travel-
ing expenses, etc. (Most of it is
about as clear as the "etc.")
ROLLS' OWN PLAN I
By our plan they can save all the
traveling expenses and keep all the
students at home and professors can
hold classes right up to the opening
whistle. In fact all afternoon.
s " *.
Just have two Michigan varsity
teams, and let them play each other
every Saturday afternoon. Take the
dedication game with Ohio next year
as an example. We would sed aset
of uniforms down to Ohio and they
would send us some nice bright scar-
let and gray suits for one of our
teams
Thus we would save everything ex-
cept the cost of shipping those uni-
forms. This might be done away
with by having each school dye its
jerseys to suit the color of the sched-
uled team.
* s *"
The Michigan reserve band could
be dressed up in Ohio State's uni.
forms, have some of their marching
ability knocked out of them, and ther
parade around as the visiting band.
* * *
Then after the "game" was over
we would telegraph the score to Co
lumbus, and compare the results. I
their "Michigan" team won and ou
"Ohio" squad lost, then it would be a
great victory for Michigan and the
students could all turn out and "rush
the Library.
* * *
If there was a mixup, with eac]
school credited with a win, then w
would flip a coin and settle it. Whic
I we might just as well do in the firs
place.
* * *
BOND DRIVE ENDS TODAY
With less than half a day to g
ROLLS' Stadium Bond fund is $498.8
from the goal of $500. But it is ex
pected that a last minute drive b
such enthusiastic workers as "Specia
Co-Ed" can put the campaign across
In fact, we will ourselves donate th
final fifty gents when the drive near
its goal.
* * *
B. AND G. MINING
Extensive mining operations ar
now being undertaken by the M. an
G. department on the campus, and th
boys hope to extract quite a lot c
valuable radium ore from the deposit
believedt to lie there.
STUDENT VIEW OF A GAME

I 'I

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants wiln however, be regarded as
confidentiall upon request.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1926
Night Editor-JO H: CHAMBERLIN
HOODLUMS

i

A RUSSIA NOT LIBERAL
To The Editor:
Will you premit a faculty man to do
a little growling at a recent editorial?
In your editorial on "Sovietism" you

music
AN])
DRAMA

t~i

ODI)S AND ENDS _
The postponement of the presenta-
ion of "The Salutation" which was to
e given by Charles Rann'Kennedy, its
uthor, assisted by his wife and Mar-
aret Gage in Hill auditorium tonight
as left a dearth of dramatic events
or the coming week.
On Monday night, November 29,
owever, Moriz Rosenthal, pianist,
will augment the musical season with
r program in Hill auditorium and on
December 4 Roland Hayes, tenor, will
ing. Rosenthal is appearing on the
Choral Union series, Hayes on the
Extra Concert programs. These two
events of major importance in the mu-
sical field are of paramount interest,
since neither of the artists have ever
appeared in Ann Arbor before. Rosen-
thal, after a season in America in 1906
discontinued recitals here for 17 years,
nd even after his sensational return
in 1923 which duplicated his debut of
some 30 years ago, Ann Arbor did not
have an opportunity to hear him.
Roland Hayes, although one of the
most famous concert artists in the
profession, has iiever appeared in Ann
Arbor, and his appearance in a pro-
gram of Negro spirituals and classical
selections will appeal to all music
lovers. * * *
THE ORIIGAN JIECI'AL
Palmer Christian, University organ-
ist, will give the following program of
organ music at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon in Hill auditorium:
Rhapsody No. 2, in D.....Saint-SeansS
The Bells of Ste. Anne de Ieaupre...
Russell
Allegretto............Woistenholme
Variations on "Weeping, F"earing,
Mourning, Trembling" ........Liszt
Bereceuse and Finale ("]'Oiseu d1
feu") .................Strawisky
Pilgrims Chorus ("Tannhauser") .....
. ...........................W agner
Prize Song ("The Meistersinger")...
.................... W agner
A m e r i c a Triumphant ("Pilgrim
Suite").....................Dunn
In past years, on account of Thanks-
giving vacation, it has been the cus-
tom to omit the weekly organ recital
on this date. This year, however,
owing to the increasing interest in
Mr. Christian's work the School of
Music has recommended that the
organ recitals be continued at all
times except when Mr. Christian is on
concert tour.
Tomorrow's program contains again
the exceptional variety which char-
acterizes his selection. Ranging from
the Saint-Saens "Rhapsody" and the
Wagner opera selections to the in-
tensely modern Strawinsky "l'Oiseau
de feu." This last number is one of
Mr. Christian's most popular organ
transcriptions.
"YOUNG WOODLEY"
A Review by Robert Wetzel.
The stage of the stuffy cavern ,called
the New Detroit underwent a Decem-
ber-to-May metamorphosis last week,
when Glenn Hunter, treading nip-
pingly on the departing heels of tho.'e
redoutable veterans, Mr. Skinner and
Miss Barrymore, tenanted the aged
playhouse for a hebdomadal sojourn
in "Young Woodley." For the past
half-decade or more, Mr. Hunter has
proudly flung the bright banners of
youth to the theatrical winds, thus
inaugurating himself as at once the
most veracious and solvent of the
stage adolescents. In "Young Wood-
ley," Mr. Hunter's success of a season
ago, now imported hither for the
delectation of the wilderness, he 's
again prosperously employed as an
engaging, if delinquent, moon-calf.
Herein Mr. Hunter is a decent En-
glish schoolboy with a synthetic ac-
cent, involved in a modest love-affair

with his headmaster's wife and note
knowing quite how he gets that way.
A chaste diversion, the play is wel-
comely fumigated of what may be
euphemistically described as its more
sinister implications. There is, in
short, nothing in it to alarm even the
English gendarmerie.
It is a simple drama, deriving its
puissance more from its basic situa-
tion than from the author's treatment
thereof. One wonders tremblingly
what "Young Woodley" would have
been if it had issued from the sly and
insinuating typewriter. of Ernest
Vadja, the Austrian analyst of the
pangs of youth. Indeed, the audience
at the New Detroit took the play as if
they thought it had. Mr. Van Druten's
pon derings on the cosmic urge were
received as if they had been Herr
Vadja's h i Ia r io u s pooh-poohings
thereon-an unembarrassed disclosure
of the audience's own humble IQ.
To this deponent, it seemed that the
competent, if theatrical, cast which
e assisted Mr. Hunter were rather
shockingly revealed as mere clever
tricksters of the drama by their star's

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As was evidenced by second rush of remark that "the chief distinguishing
the Arcade theater this year following mark which an American would find
the arrival of the football team Sun,- between his own and the Russian gov-
lay night, there seems to be a maud- ernments would be that there the in-
liii element on the campus which has dustries are owned by the government
lost all respect for law and order, and and not run to wreak a cruel profit

for gentlemanly conduct.
If this hoodlum group is capable of
abs'orbing one sensible, thoughtful
idea, it should realize thatthe "rah
rah," peace-disturbing, property-
wrecking collegian is out of place at
this institution. As a reflection on the
true type of Michigan student, their
actions are absolutely disgusting.
THE CONFERENCE TIE
Another Big Ten football season has
ended resulting in the annual tie for
championship honors. Sports writers
are now busily engaged in doping out
just which team was the better and
in trying to show that one or the other
is 'more deserving of being declared
superior.
This is not an unusual occurrence,
in, fact rarely is one team the undis-
puted holder of the Conference cham-
pionship. This cannot be avoided un-
der the present system of rating by
percentage only, particularly since the
Conference is ~so large that all mem-
bers cannot meet during the same sea-
son.
However, it seems too bad that two
schools cannot share championship
honors without being egged on by the
newspapers to-lay claim to having the
better teani. Both teams should be
given credit for having completed a
successful season. Perhaps one of
the schools did have a somewhat
easier schedule, than the other, but
this, under the present system, has
nothing to do with the championship.
The teams were both good or they
could not have come through the sea-
son with a perfect record.
Until post-season contests are held
to settle ties, there should be no argu-
ment about which is the better of two
tying teams. Each should receive
equal honor.
DOMINION 1IMMGRATION
The day is apparently past, judging
by the recent action of the British
Imperial conference, when the only

out of the employees."
I think the American would find
some other "distinguishing marks."
On election day he would find that if
he drew an income from private prop-
erty, or employed help, or were a
clergyman, he would not be allowed
to vote at all. If he were a farmer,
his vote would have only a small
fraction of the weight" of the vote of
a city dweller. Even if he were a
privileged city laborer (the only class
still possessing even a shadow of po-
litical right) he could vote only for a
town council, which would vote in
turn for a state council, which would
vote for a Congress, which would se-
lect a permanent committee, which
would select a cabinet! (The farmer's
vote would be filtered through many
more stages). He would also dis-
cover that freedom of speech, press
and assemblage had utterly ceased to
exist and that it would imperil his
freedom or even his life to write about
America capitalism in as compli-
mentary a way as you wrote of Rus-
sian Bolshevism.
If the American looked to economic
freedom to replace political freedom,
he would find the emancipated Rus-
sian laborer existing (not really liv-
ing) on an average wage about one-
tenth that of the same class in the
United States. In the country he
would find farmers dying by hundreds
of thousands in the great famine
years, partly because the government
had seized their surplus grain and
thus discouraged planting.
If he looked to intellectual freedom
the case would be worst of all. The
class to which I belong, the "intelli-
gentsia" or "professoriate," has suf-
fered more persecution than bour-
geois, peasant or laborer, perhaps
even more than the old aristocracy.
Thousands of Russians who risked
their lives to throw off the tyranny of
Tsardom have been killed, exiled or
ground to poverty by the new tyranny
because they did not accept in its
entirety the Gospel according to Saint

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* S S
STUDENTS USE TEAR GAS
About 500 students welcomed the
team back to town Sunday, the team
that had brought back the highest
honor in the Conference after a hard-
fought season. Five policemen welcom-
ed them to the Arcade with tear gas
when they tried to celebrate.1
* * *
Now, we aren't trying to incite a
riot, but if the Student council, when
it urges better college spirit, would
also supply the students with a
stronger variety of tear gas than the
police have, there might be some
celebration of victories around here.j
* * *
And perhaps there would be fewer
heads dented by policemen's billies.
Unless the police took to defending
themselves with T. N. T.
* * *
IXZO BEATS BALLOON
Admiral Ixzo, pride of the Wolver-
ines, arrived in Minneapolis on the
front of the special train carryingi
Michigan's rooter to the game, beat-
ing the balloon by five snow drifts.
* * *
The "Donner & Blitzen 0," the
aeronautical society's entry, fell with
a crash into a snow bak on the side-

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