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November 20, 1926 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-20

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4

PAUE EIGHT

SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 1924

THE MiCTITC'sAM FATT v

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DAILYOFIILBLEN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. M. (11:30 a. m. Saturdays).

Volume VII

SA TURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1926

Number 47

.__.._

UnIdersity Lecture:
Mr. Chester H. Rowell, Michigan '88, Regent of the University of Cali-
fornia, formerly editor of the Fresno, Cal., Republican, will deliver a Uni-
versity lecture Monday, November 22, at 8 p. m. in the Natural Science
Auditorium on the subject "Recent Impressions of Russia." The public
is cordially invited.
F. E. Robbins.
University Lecture:
Dr. Henry Guppy, president of the Btish Library Association and
Librarian of the John Rylands Library, Manchester, England, will give a
University lecture on the subject "The Stepping Stones to the Art of Typo-
graphy" at 4:15 p. m., Monday, November 22, in the Natural Science Audi-
torium. The lecture will be illustrated by stereopticon. The public is cor-
dially invited. F. E. Bobbins.
Students, College of Lecture, Science and the Arts:
Permission to drop courses without E grade may not be given after
Thanksgiving Day. The fact that examinations are given in certain courses
after this date does not affect the operation of this rule. Exceptions will
be made only in cases of extended illness, or because of similarly serious
conditions not under the student's control.
W. R. Humphreys, Asst. Dean
I will not be in my office at the Health Service Saturday iorning.
Margaret Bell.
Freshman Women:
The fourth require'd Hygiene Lecture will be given November 22nd.
at 4:15 in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall. Bring blue books.
Margaret Bell.
Entering Solphomore and Upperclass Wonien and old Students who have
Hygiene Lectures to make up:
The fourth Hygiene Lecture will be given on Tuesday, November 23rd
at 4:15 in Sarah Caswell Angell Hall. Bring blue books.
Margaret Bell.
Junior and Senior Women :
Junior and Senior Women who have not fulfilled the Physical Educa-
tion retuirement should come to Barbour Gymnasium Tuesday, November
23rd or Wednesday, November 24th to elect courses.
Ethel A. McCormick.
Freshmen and Sophomore Women:
Tuesday and Thursday sections in Physical Education will elect courses
for the Indoor season at regular class hours on Tuesday, November 23rd.
Monday and Wednesday sections will elect courses at regular class hours
on Wednesday, November 24th.
Ethel A. McCormick.
Freshman Advisory Group:
My Freshman group will meet at my home at 1:45 today. Radio reports
of the game.
Waldo M. Abbot.
University of Michigan Band:
Formation today at Morris Hall 2 p. m. Uniform with cape.
Norman Larson, Director.

Estate Subdivisions." All members of the teaching staff and graduate stu-
dents in Economics and Business Administration are invited.
Edmund E. Day.
Student Volunteer Group:
Prof. A. S. Woodburne; Ph. D., Professor of Comparative Religions i
the School of Religion, will talk to the Student Volunteer Group on th2
subject "The Missionary College," at VesleyeHall, atr9:15 Sunday morning.
Dr. Woodburne has been foir the last five years the Professor of Philosophy
at Madras, University of Madras, .India. This meeting is open to all stu-
dents interested in the subject in any way.
Wells Thoins, Pres.
Men's Educational Club:
An important meeting of the Men's Educational Club will be held
Monday, November 22, at 7:00 p. m. in Room 304 of the Michigan Union.
Dean Kraus will speak on "Recent Changes in Higher Education in Ger-
many." All men interested in education are urged to be present.
J. D. Cooper, Pres.
To All Seniors:
In order to accommodate the large number of Seniors who are now
having their pictures taken, the Michiganensian business office in the Press
Building, og Maynard Street will be open from 9 to 12 this morning and
from 1:30 to 5 every afternoon next week.
IV. F. Graham, Business Manager.
LITTLE ADVOCATES HOME AND HOME
FOOTBALL SCHEDULES FOR BIG TEN

AROUSES GERMANS BY
AMERICAN FLAG DISPLAY

COLLEGIATE CLOTHES SHOP

SUITS AND OVERCOATS
for
COLLEGE MEN

(Continued from, Page One)
game on its merits, for the wider dis-
tribution of physical and mental bene-
fits derived from it and for its less
emotional and more nearly amateur
establishment, a large amount of less
over-pmphasized opportunity for play
will be a great benefit. The profes-
sional influence would also be weak-
ened."
Answering possible objections tio
this plan which may arise, the Presi-
dent gave' his views on several of
them. That "smaller Conference
schools cannot develop two teams,"
was one of the objections raised and
answered. "Unless ready-made stars
imported from preparatory scl 3ols
are. relied upon, it should be no more
difficult to develop and to play two
teams against one another than it is
to play one team. More than two full
teams are taken to every game by all
Conference schools."
President Little believes that the
objection on the ground that "visiting
students will not add to the spirit of

tie game," is not very severe, since
little chance exists for social contact;
between students. The "increased!
expenditure for coaches" would note
be excessive in, Dr. Little's opinion,
for the two teams could be trained
together, being separated only for
games, at which time one coach could
go with the traveling team.l
"Why change the present system?"
Because there is a steadily increasing
body of intelligent opposition to the
present situation, declared the Presi-
dent. Evidence of commercialism,
featuring of stars, glorification of the
coach, decrease in loyalty for the in-
stitution, wasted time by students in
long trips to games, disruption of
teaching schedule, dissatisfaction wtih
seating arrangements, "scalping," and
gambling a r e steadily increasing.
Friends of intercollegiate football
must change its setting and emphasis
or else prepare to see it forced to lose
its opportunities by their unwilling-
ness to face the situation frankly,
said President Little in conclusion.

Baron Ago von Maltzen
SGerman ambassador to the United
States, has aroused Nationalist leaders
in the Reichstag for raising the Amer-
ican flag over the German embassy in
Washington Armistice Day. They de-
mand his recall.
Do you know that the price
of a swim at the Michigan
Union has been reduced to
i Oc?
USE THE UNION
POOL

.
y

Tom Corbett's Shop has always been one hundred per
cent for Michigan and Michigan Men. Our clothes are
specially tailored to meet their discriminating requirements and
our line of furnishings in standard and special designs is care-
fully selected to please them and to enhance their appearance.

I

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JUST READY-

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The

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More Beautiful and Interesting Titan Ever.
Limited Edition. 75c Each.

Tom

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COLLEGIATE SHOP
116 EAST LIBERTY

WA R'S

BOOK STOR E

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Economics Club:
The club will meet
of the Michigan Union.

Monday, November 22, at 7:45 p. m. in Room 306
Mr. H. F. Taggart will speak on "Costs in Real

Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

W40-

....
... .. .

i. ii

Thanksgiving

1^lpadGradDnvi

P,

a

The Donovan Organization
again scores a scoop on all
competitors-

34

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After the first harvest in 1621, the New England colonists made pro-
vision for a day of thanksgiving and prayer. Gradually the custom prevailed
of appointing a Thanksgiving Day, which evolved into our present Gover-
nor's Proclamation.

Philip and Gerald Donovan
The famous P. & G. Boys.

m

J-

Every human being knows the day and observes it.

To the youngster,

it is the day that the table is loaded with goodies and the day that Daddie

is at home to play with them.

They are happy and unconsciously thankful.

To the young man and woman planning for the future, having experienced

some' of the difficulties in life, it is a sacred day.

They have learned the

value of prayer.

To the mother and father, it is a joyful day of Thanks-

188 Proof, Formula 5
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giving for the happy family circle which they ave about them. And to the

grandmother and grandfather' it is a day of reverence.
lives, fought their battles, and reaped the benefits.

They have lived their

To feel the true spirit of the day and observe itis one of the beautiful
things of life. Living and the happiness derived from it, is one thing, and
the recognition of the benevolence of a Supreme Being, in giving that life

1'

and happiness to us is another.

The individual;" the home, the state, and

Our first shipment 16,000 gallons, 12 carloads on the way
Donovan's Special Motor Oil, 45c a gallon

the nation unite in offering prayers of thanksgiving 'and praise on Thanks-
giving Day.

f

I

Corner
Huron
and
Ashley

FSTABLISNED IN ALL T14E BEST
TOWNS IN MICIdIGAN.
f4

I'

'0{

it

Corner
Huron
and
Ashley

Ii

It 12

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