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November 18, 1926 - Image 4

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I

PAGE .FO".~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY -

Tf(I'1RSDAY , NO(VEM I1I; h :C1 ', 192f''

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the. Board in.
Control of Student Publications.
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Association.
The Associated Phess is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered. at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postagengranted by Third Assistant Post-
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MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor,.................W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor.................Irwin A. Olian
NewsEditors....Frederick Shillito
News Eitors..........Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor......... .Marion Kubik
Sports Editor.......... ..Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor...........Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behyet Ellis Merry
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Jamen Herald Ccasamn A. Wilson
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this as an unmistakable sign that
Austria will soon have another king,
whether a Hapsburg or not.
-Calamity seekers will immediately
deplore the decay of civilization; and
the return to tyranny; but when we
examine the facts it may not be as
bad as it seems. Hungary is a coun-
try of unintelligent peasants, un-
schooled in self government and not
interested in learning. Over one-third
of the people of the nation were illi-
terate in 1910; and self government
hasn't the same appeal to them that it
has to the fiery Anglo Saxon. A mon-
archy is a type of secure condition
that appeals to the dull mind of the
Hungarian peasant; and to them mon-
archy is the finest form of govern-
ment.
Progress in this kind of a nation
must begin at the bottom and develop
from the very roots of the civilization.
Before a superficial democracy can be
imposed there must be a gradual en-
lightenment of the people through the
ages. There is certainly no cause
for alarm in the apparent trend; it is
rather a gesture towards increased
stability and solidarity. If this is the
case, then the king will not only be
inoffensive; he will be an asset.
VINDICATION
The formerly defamed but devoted
users of the "pony" in translating the
classics may point with triumph at
the recent ditum of a University of
Chicago educator who maintains that
the looking up of words in the vo-
cabulary in the back of a text, in the
light of modern efficiency, is unpro-
ductive motion and a waste of time,
most of which could be eliminated by
the intelligent use of "ponies" or
interlinear translations.
Caesar, he estimates, requires some
6,000 references to the vocabulary.
Most of the time required in this, he
says, could be saved for productive
efforts with an interlinear translation.
Similar examples might be quoted.
It has been with considerable grief
that modern educators have been won
over to the value of an intelligent use
of the "pony." Time was, say its fol-
lowers, when the scholastic penalties
for its use approached those of an
inquisition. But the long suffering
devotees have now been vindicated
and this wrong (?) righted. Yet how
many forgotten and unsung martyrs
have gone down to inglorious defeat
for the cause?
SOVIETISM.
Sherwood Eddy, after completing a
summer in which he has again studied
all the nations of Europe, has made
another statement. This is not in the
least unusual; but once every three
or four years Mr. Eddy makes a state-
ment which is worth repeating, and
this latest is certainly of that descrip-
tion.
"The Soviet government has come
to stay," he says, and coming as it
does from one who should know, this
statement may shock many. If our
idea of sovietism; however, were cor-
rect, we should probably not be the
least shocked by this assertion. The
Soviet government, contrary to the
popular misconception, does not stand
for nationalization of women and
abolition of the church and a dozen
and one other freaks of press corre-
spondent's imaginations. It is a cold
rational institution, deriving i t s
strength from a large but select body
of Russians, and attempting to give
to the backward nation an enlighten-
ed and intelligent government. Prob-
ably the chief distinguishing mark
which an American would find be-

tween his own and the Russian gov-
ernments would be that there the in-
dustries are owned by the government,
and not run to wreak a cruel profit
out of the employees.
The experiment in Russia is littlP
more than an experiment in socialism
on a grand scale. If it is successful,
it will merely be a practical vindica-
tion of that type of government.

t.

George Alin Jr.
Melvin H. Baer
D. M. Brown
M. H. Cain
Daniel Finley
B. H. Handley
A. M. Hinkley
E. L. Hulse
S. Kerbawy
R. A. Meyer
Harvey Rosenblum
William F. Spencer
Harvey Talcott
Harold Utley

L. J. Van Tuyl
J. B. Wood
Esther Booze
Hilda Binzer
Dorothy Car enter
Marion A. Daniel
Beatrice Greenberg
Selma M. -Janson
Mvlarion' Kerr
Marion L. rReading
Harriet C. Smith
Nance Solomon
Florence Widmaier

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1926
Night Editor-JAMES T. HERALD
SPEAKING BLUNTLY
So long as a coach of a college foot-
ball team produces a winning combi-
nation he is praised and held in high
esteem by the student body and alumni
of the particular school which he rep-
resents. Once his team loses two or
three games in one season, however,
lie is subjected to much criticism.
All the great coaches of this coun-
try have had their bright and dull mo-
ments, they have seen these periods of
praise and they have seen the periods
of dejection. "Pop" Warner produced
some of the, greatest teams in this
country, but when his teams com-'
menced to lose he was criticised.
Rockne, Stagg, Zuppke, Roper, Dobie
and even our own Coach Yost have
been at times unjustly criticised.
The significant fact to be noted is,
that these veteran coaches rarely, if
ever, try to answer the charges of
their unjust critics. Coach Tad Jones
of Yale, however, prefers to meet his
critics toe to toe and the statement
he addressed to ;his critics recentlyf
was blunt to say the least. It fol-
lows;
"Those yellowbellies who crucified
my brother and Frank Hinkey and
Tom Shevlin are not going to crucify
me. I was forced into this job; but as
long as Yale wants mea as a football
coach I'll stay, and when Yale says
she doesn't want me I'll go. I am,
willing to be judged by other coaches.
This criticism is coming from shyster
lawyers, poor doctors and dentists,
and $18-a-week clerks who think they
know more football than Roper, Do-
bie, myself and all the other coaches
in the country."
Perhaps this is a blunt way of an-
swering unjust criticism, but if coach-
es were frank with their criticisers
there would, in all'likelihood, be less
criticism.I

remember that we studied here, but
it can never forget what they paid
here.
It is for us, the students, rather to
be here resigned to the money making
proposition that they have thus far
so loyally perpetrated. It is for us
rather to be here dedicated to the
great task remaining before us, that
for these ex-students we take seats
in sections X, Y, and Z, that they may
sit on the 50 yard line, for which they;
have paid $500, interest at three per
cent, and redeemable "in ten years;
that we here highly resolve that the
money shall not have been paid in1
vain, and that this University under
the Regents shall have a new stadium;
and this stadium of the "alums," by
the "alums," and for the "alums,"
shall not perish from the state of
Michigan.
-C. G., '29.
ANSWERING THE FRESHMAN
To The Editor:
If the "vituperation" of the "Elderly I
Freshman," so generously condensed
from four columns to four-fifths of
a column. in the Daily of Saturday
last, did not directly challenge my
own mentality; were it other than a
brazen insult to Donal Hamilton
Haines, Clara Clemens Gabrilowitch,
and to her fellow artists in Mr.
Haines' adaptation of Joan of Arc, by
Mark Twain, I could dash it aside
with the same degree of disgust and
contempt I felt while reading it. The
sooner such refuse is buried in the
waste-basket or burned, the better it
is for everybody. Had his protesta-
tion thus been treated by its writer
immediately after composition, how
much better still it would have been
for the "Elderly Freshman" himself,
for the University, for those who pro-
duced and presented the adaptation,
and for those of us who were suffi-
ciently "gullible" to enjoy it.
In spite of the disgust for his sub-
ject-matter generated by the Elderly
Freshman's protestation, one can
scarcely help being struck by the ex-
cellence of its writing. Indeed, most
remarkable literary talent is dis-
played, to say the most. I could not
help likening it all, however, to the
pitiable ravings of a past moaster of
the art of literary expression, couched
in that apt phraseology which can not
be disintegrated by declining years,
though the mind may dwindle ever so
much into the bleakness of senility.
Now I happened to attend the stage
presentation of Joan of Arc in Hill
auditorium last Wednesday evening.
What is more, I was "gullible" enough
to enjoy it thoroughly from start to
finish. Furthermore, I was not
obliged to feign "politeness" in re-
maining until I had witnessed all
three acts (not four) as the Elderly
Freshman says lie was obliged to do
in order to stay until the close of the
first act, after which he left, his fine,
superior sensibilities shocked to the
utmost by what he had been forced to
see and pay for seeing.
Somehow our senile freshman de-
ludes himself into believing that he
is the appointed spokesman for an
audience criminally wronged and im--
posed upon without adequate intel-
ligence or aesthetic sensibility to re-
alize that it had been defrauded, and
that same audience, by the way, one
that had seen the whole play, and not;
merely the first act alone.a
And now consider this most pic-
turesque utterance:
"In spite of"the God-awfulness of it,
however, I continued, like the rest of
the audience, perfectly polite and
"didn't leave-until the end of the first

act. That I could only stomach one
act is obviously fortunate for the
reader, for had I remained for the
four acts, and still had sense and
strength enough to wield a pen, I
would have required four times again
as much space to frame my vitupera-
tion."
Now a freshman, elderly though he
may unfortunately be, who has the
guts to suppose that the maudlin rav-
ings of his own unappreciative mind
insist on getting themselves into print
regardless of length or subject-mat-'
ter, is a freshman whose stomach, if
not some other portion of his anatomy,
certainly does need more or less im-
mediate attention. Note the naive
inconsistency of our "Elderly Fresh-
man." He leaves after the first act,
and then says: "The whole affair, etc.,
etc." Here we have a dramatic critic
who supposes himself capable of de-J
termining the worth of a play to the+
rest of the audience on the basis of
only one act to which his superior in-
tellect and taste is so criminally andf
outrageously exposed. ' I
Now if I am "gullible" in enjoying1
the play as I most certainly did, thent
thank God for gullibility. If my uni-e
versity training ever brings me tof
such an advanced state of sophistic-t
aion that I can not get a real, genuine,
worth-while- dramatic kick or thrilla

THE MATINEE MUSICALE
A review, by Robert Carson
Andrew Haigh presented a beautiful
synthetic study of the modern Run-
sian piano music at the lecture-re-
cital yesterday afternoon. The pro-
grain was quite different from the or-
dinary; the artist combined a few per-
tinent remarks about each composer
and an analysis of each selection be-
fore playing it. Unquestionably An-
drew Haigh has a dexterity in tech-
nique that is seldom gurpassed, ren-
dering the entire program with the
utmost ease and precision. His inter-
pretation of these Russian selections
was unusually brilliant considering
their difficulty.
The "Prelude in E Flat Minor-Opus
23" by Rachmaninoff began with
double notes for the right hand and
chromatics superimposed. This num-
ber was difficult for an opening ,selec-
tion, but well done. Theo second of
the Rachmaninoff group was the "pre-
lude in A Minor-Ous 32" which was
a study in the development of a small
motif.
Scriabin started out in the field of
the conventional composition, but
from that developed an original style
that went far ahead of his contempor-
aries. The first movement of his
"Sonata No. 4-Opus 30" is short, con-
taining an exotic, yet melodious theme
that is used once more in the body of
the Sonata. Such music could only
be born in the mind of a Russian.
Medtner is primarily an orchestral
composer but in the piano field le
has written some of the most difficult
selections. This "Sonata in G minor--
Opus 22" is his most important piano
work. It is rich in thematic material
and multiplicity of odd rhythms. An-
drew Haigh mastered this in fine style.
.Te Sonata is made more Rus-
sian, perhaps, by the use of effective
dissonances that somehow do not mar
somehow do not mar its beauty.
The Balakireff whimsical "Islamay"
is considered the most difficult piano
number ever written. It contains a
whirling dervish effect with variations
on a theme that is characteristically
oriental.
PUCCINI'S POlSTl' UI US OPE RNAU
After the death of Puccini, whose
"Madame Butt erfly" is one of the
most popular of modern operas, it
was found that lie had left an almost
complete musical score and libretto
for a new Chinese opera ,rurandoC'
based upon the famous Gozzi dramatic
fable. On next Tuesday night the
American premiere of this posthumous
work will be given at the Metropolitan
with Maria Jeritza in the title role.
Madame Jeritza last season created
the role of Princess Turandot in Vi-
enna while Fleta who sang Calaf in
the world premiere at La Scala will
appear in the same role. The plot is
perfect for grand opera; fervidly dra-
matic with a wonderful curtain to the
first act and genuine offsetting com-
edy in the trio of Ping, Pang and Pung
who lend an atmosphere hinting of
Gilbert and Sullivan. With Jeritza as
the proud and beautiful princess in
gowns and settings that are elabor-
ately colorful the piece should thrill
as no other premiere for years has.
* * *

It way cost you a little more for
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CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be'
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential u Wn request.

a

ANOTHER KING

Eight years ago a war was ended,
and the great wave of democracy that
had been pent up in Europe for cent-
uries broke forth and established
democratic forms of government in
nearly every country in Europe.
America had waved flags for two
years and strained every sinew to
make the world safe for democracy;
and so democracy came.
In 1921, under pressure from the lit-
tle Entente and the Allies. Hungary

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FOUR SCORE-!
To The Editor:
Fourscore and nine years ago our
fathers brought forth upon the left
meander of the Huron river a new
university, conceived in a moment of
ecstacy, and dedicated to the proposi-
tion that all men must study or play
football.'
Now we are engaged in a great sta-
dium drive, testing whether that uni-
versity or any university so conceived
and so dedicated, can long endure,
within thirty yards from either goal
post.
We are here to build a portion of it
as a final resting place for those who
donate their features to be plastered
upon the landscape that the pigskin
shall survive.
It is altoeether neessarv and.

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"Th1e Garric'k ae les"
A review, by Thouas111 Dull II
There is an aura of intelligence
about the Garrick Gaeties which re-
minds one quite favorably of the first
Charlot's Revue. Of course there is
no Beatrice Lillie, no Gertrude Law-
rence, nor a Jack Buchanan. But the
show does not need any outstanding
stars, for there is a smooth synchron-
ization of talent in it that make it one
of the most delightful entertainments
of the year.
The cast is young and hard woxking.
And though neither Virginia Watson
nor Hal Thompson can sing extraord-
inarily well, they make good use of
what talent they have in that direc-
tion and really put their numbers
across. Miss Watson's dancing, mora-
over, is very, very good. Among the
others, there is Hildegarde Halliday
whose character study in the Ruth
Draper manner is funny and authen-
tic; Eleanor Shaler, who does her best
work as Pimento in the "Rose of Ari-
zona;" William Griffiths who is only
poor when he attempts the Bobby
Clark type of comedy; and a chorus,
unusual for its individual talent.
Some of the numbers are held ov-r
from last year's edition which did not
leave New York. Among these are I
'Sentimental Me" and "The Butcher,
the Baker, and the Candlestick Mah-
er," an unusual study in prenatal in-
fluence. These are good, but the best
things in the show are three buries-
lues-"Tennis Champs," "Washington
and the Spy," and "Rose of Arizona"--
he latter being billed as the Hundred

il

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