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November 16, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-16

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,,- (-) , , I .\I I, , 1, *, , , ,, r :
TUESDA", T,

PAGE FOuR THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER tO, 192~

....

ternal strife of China and, to a lesser
'h t t degree, the unrest inIndia also in-
dicate that the East may e the danger
Published every morning except Monday zone of the world in the future.
during the University year by the Board in.
Control of Student Publications.

Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Pf'ss is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-I
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate,
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices:tAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF,
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor................W. Calvin Patterson
City Editpr................Irwin A. Olian
News Editors........... Frederick Shillito
1Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor.......... . ....Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Edior..........Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama........ Vincent C~WalU, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry I
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
J o Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
ames Herald C: ssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters
Maion Anderson Miles Kimball
Alex Bochnowski Milton Kirshbaum
Jcan Campbell Richard Kurvink.
Martin J. Cohn G. Thomas McKean,
Clarence Edelson Adeline' O'Brien
William Emery Kenneth Patrick
Alfred Lee Foster Morris Quinn
Robert E. Finch James Sheehan
John Friend -N. 3. Smtith
Robert Gessner Sylvia Stone
ElainetGruber William Thurnau
Coleman J. Glencer Milford Vanik
Harvey J. Gunderson Herbert Vedder
Stewart Hooker Marian Weles
Morton B. Icuve Thaddeus Wasielewski
Paul Kern Sherwood Winslow
Ervin Laltowe
.U INESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED. JR.,
Advertising.................Paul W. Aavild
Advertising.....a..........William C. Pusch
Advertising..............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising..........George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation................T. Kenneth Haen
Publication.............. .John H. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants

SUPPORT THE AMENDMENTS
Just where opposition to the pro-
posed amendments to the Union con-
stitution would arise is a difficult
thing to discover. -
Freshmen who, should the amend-
ments pass, would automatically be-
come life members after four years
in the University, certainly would not
oppose such a suggestion; present life
members still in school, would receiveI
a ten dollar refund from this year and1
and each succeeding year's tuition;
should be strongly in favor of the
change; and all other male students,
who might receive a life membership
for the difference between $50 and the
total amount of Union fees already
paid by him, would be accorded the
maximum of liberal treatment possi-
ble by such a valuable and expensive
institution as the Union.
These amendments cannot be acted
upon, however, unless 600 members
attend the meeting which has been
called for tomorrow. For his own
benefit, therefor, as well as for the
good of the rest of the present
and future students and for the elimi-
nation of one more worthy but bother-
some annual campus drive, should
each Union member assist in the pass-
ing of these amendments tonorrow.
VACATIONS IN POLITICS
Nothing is more true than the state-
ment that the President of the United
States is public property. If he seeks
any future whatsoever in politics, he
must continually play to the popular
favor ;and besides managing the larg-
est business in the world, the people
of the United States expect him to
take hours off each day in shaking
hands with them and kissing babies
and otherwise generally wasting time.
Now the President's vacation has
entered the political grab-bag, and it
appears that even that short period
no longer belongs to him. Last sum-
mer, abandoning his life long vaca-
tion home in New England, President
Coolidge went to New York. This on
the surface would appear to be insig-
nificant enough, but when we remem-
ber that Al Smith, a Democrat, had
carried the Empire State for governor
two years ago in the face of the Cool-
idge majority for President; and that
that same Al Smith would again head
the Democratic ticket in the Novem-
ber elections and thereby threaten the
Republican senators, there appears to
be an ulterior motive. There was a
reason for flattering the people of
New York with the presence of the
President for two months.
Now it has been announced that
Coolidge will go West for his vacation
in 1927. If there is any particular
spot in the country where the Repub-
licans are notably weak it is in the
Middle West where farm relief has
been neglected and in the Far West
where the people still consider Sen-
ator Hiram Johnson in the light of a
hero and follow him on his World
Court stand. It has become apparent
that somewhere in the West the Pres-
ident will spend the summer, repair-
ing his political fences and flattering
the perhaps gullible Americans with
his austere presence.
There seems to be reasonably no
excuse for the last of these great de-
mands which the Americans make
upon their President. It is enough
'to expect him to shake hands with
several thousand high school Wash-
ington clubs every spring without add-
ing the burden of dictating his vaca-
tion site. California, which Randolph
Hearst favors, would perhaps be a
fine place for a summer vacation, but
if the President must spend his own
vacation why not let him choose th

place himself?_

TESD OLL
FUBND
PASSES
DOLLAR MARK
We'll probably be talking about that
0. S. U. game for the next week or
two, so if you don't like to hear aboutd
it, now's the time to cancel your sub-
scription. (The rates go up today.)
* , ,4
It was only after a good deal of
worry and argument that we got top
see the game at all. We went downA
to Columbus without a ticket, hoping
to get into the press box, but fearingo
for the worst. Mr. Pollard down there
got quite sarcastic when we askedr
for a press box ticket on the grounds'
of being "humor editor" of the Daily.t
"Say," he said, "do you think thist
game is going to be funny?"j
* * *
Finally he agreed that we ought toI
view the spectacle, and because the
press box was filled, he said he was
giving us a good ticket in a field box.l
If he hadn't handed over that ticket
we would have had to write a story
about how it seems to be one of those
outside the walls.
* * *
MORE BAND PLAYS1
We have been told about two playsI
in the band struggle that we missed
entirely. We make no claims for mu-I
sical knowledge anyway. It seems
that Ohio's drum-major fumbled his
baton on his march down the field,1
and didn't recover until they hadI
spelled out "Ohio" and made a few
other plays.
Michigan's leader, after the game,
threw his baton too high over the goal I
posts and the pass was incomplete.
He recovered immediately, however.
Variect-colored streamers w e r e
thrown from the upper deck on Ohio's
stands, adding to the festive scenes.
Guns were fired and a bomb landed
in the bleacher stands. That latter
is one thing the Michigan Athletic as-
sociation hasn't tried to do to the
students.
s * s
An ambulance was waiting out in
front, of the stadium, and as far as
we could see the only ones who would
have to use it would be the cops that
tried to keep ticketless fans from
breaking down the iron gates in a
mad rush to see what all the yelling
was about inside.
* * *r
Ohio's cheerleaders rode around the
field on bicycles bearing signs in the
wheels which spelled out, "Beat
Michigan" but you could also read it,
"Be At Michigan," which was good
advice.
* * *
An Ohio man near us at the game
Saturday said that whenever an air-
plane passed over the stadium it
meant good luck for Michigan. Just
then two planes appeared and Benny
threw a pass to Benny over the goal
line.
* * *
TO MINNEAPOLIS VIA BIKE
s ME
? V
r

Admiral Ixzo, having sworn off
horse racing for life, left quietly for
the Minnesota game on his two.
cylinder bicycle. His assistant is
traveling incognito.
** *
FUND WAKES UP
As soon as we left town the money
began to come in for the fund.I

MUSICG.R§JHAVIS
AND
DRAMA LBOOKLS
THE MATiNEE JUSICALE Travel - Poetry - Plays - Fiction - Biographies
A study of Russian music in its A Very Complete Stock of the Latest and Best Books.
development, and the general charac-
teristics of this school will be the !
subject of a piano-lecture given by
Andrew Haigh, instructor in the -
piano faculty of the School of Music, _.At Both Ends of The Di goni!1
at the second meeting of the Matinee
Musicale, which will be held in the
Assembly hall of the :Union at 4 I _____4_________

:

George Ahn Jr.
Melvin H. Baer
D. M. Brown
M. H. Cain
Daniel Finley
B. H. Haley
A. Al. Hinkley
E. L. Hlulse
S. Kerbawy
R. A. Meyer
Harvey Rosenblum
William F. Spencer
Harvey Talcott
Harold Utley

L. J. Van Tuyl
J. B. Wood
Esther Booze
Hilda Binzer
Dorothy Carpenter
Marion A. Daniel
Beatrice Greenberg
Selma M. Janson
Marion Kerr
'Marion L. Reading
Harriet C. Smith
Nance Solomon
Florence Widmaier

o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
This program will be one of the
most interesting of the year, since
Mr. Haigh is an authority on all phas-
es of this subject which was the fea-
tured studly of the faculty group of
the School of Music last year. In con-
junction with this Haigh will pre-
sent the following piano numbers:
Sonata in G minor, Opus 22 . Medtner
Islamay .... ........ ...alakireff
Prelude in E flat minor, opus 23
.Rachmaninoff
Prelude in A minor, opus 23
.Rachmaninoff
Sonata No. 4, opus 39 .... Scriabin
Incidentally the Islamay by Bala-
kireff is considered the most difficult
piano number ever written, and Mr.
Haigh is one of the intrepid few who
have dared incorporate it in their re-
pertoire. The Medtner Sonata is
equally interesting for Medtner is
seldom if ever found on the program
of concert pianists in the United
States; in fact Rachmaninoff is the
only artist who has given it a definite
place on his program. And the Rach-
maninoff numbers are equally unus-
ual, being an entirely different phase
of that pianist's work.
THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review by Robert Carson
The cello concert anti the Borodin
"In the Convent" were the pleasing
highlights of the symphony concert
yesterday afternoon and the fact that
the orchestra has reached the stage
where it can be praised with little
damnation instead of being damned
"with little praise" testifies to a mark-
ed improvement over the previous
year. The quality of the musicianship
has been raised and the usual mis-
I takes and inability to achieve a real
fortissimo are the only earmarks of
an amateur group evident. But in the
I general impression these are over-
shadowed by the unity and expression
that the symphony has attained in its
ensemble work. Samuel Lockwood
has certainly done creditable work
with the orchestra as the results clear-
ly show. But even he became a little
profane mentally, perhaps, when he
worked them up to a crescendo that
never came!
The opening number, the Overture
to "The Merry Wives of Windsor," by
Nicolai, was predominately ior the
string and woodwind groups, a light,
airy selection, very florid, in which
the oboe and bassoon showed a qual-
ity heretofore unnoticed in the- Sym-
phony. The strings performed their
parts admirably. The "ConcertoI
Grosso, D Minor" by Vivaldi brought
out the distinct talent of Angelina
Lockwood who played the violin solo
passages.
Saint-Saens has written only one
cello concerto, "Concert, A Minor, Op.
o3," and this requires all the technical
skill the cellist can muster. Walter
Bloch, who is of the faculty of the
Music school and a newcomer to Ann
Arbor, executed this difficult selec-
tion in fine fashion although his tone
is not as powerful and smooth as it
might be.
The best number on the program
was the fine arrangement by Albert
Lockwood of "In the Convent" by the
Russian, Borodin, a contemporary of
Mazorgski and Rimsky-Korsakov. The
occasional dissonance, the weird bell
sounds and the strange effects produc-
ed by the blending of contrasting in-
struments are typical of the Russian
school, extremely original.
s f
A iE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, will present the following pro-
gram at the Twilight Organ Recital at
4:15 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
Hill auditorium:
Piece Heroique.............Franck
Andante Cantabile (Symphony V)
. ......... . . ..... Tschaikowsky
Romance Sans Paroles .......Bonnet
Prelude and Fugue in D major

It may cost you a little more for
service at

p Rser's Pen Shop.

--but it will be

REAL SERVICE

I

and this after all is what counts

I

FOUNTAIN PENS

TYPEWRITERS

QUICK SERVICE

CC ~\
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Style - Quality - Service.
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burneu Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415

Beginning Tomorrow Night
Granger' s Advanced Class
in Dancing

'4

Beginning Wednesday,

Nore, nbcr 17,

SKILLED RPAI'UNG

our advanced class in dancing will meet

at the Academy.

Tuition $5 for term

I
'
I

(Where D. U. R. Stopss

at State)

of ten lessons. Enroll now by phoning
the Academy-5822.
Da1-i1GRANGER'S FACAyDEay.
Dancing W~ednesday, Friday, Saturday.

5v

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1926
Night Editor-ELLIS B. MERRY
TO THE SCARLET AND GRAY
In what was perhaps the greatest
and most spectacular game in the his-
tory of modern conference football,
the Maize and Blue won from the
Scarlet and Gray Saturday by the nar-
row margin of one point. Many spec-
tators thought this one point repre-
sented just about the difference in the
ability of the two teams. A larger
majority thought them equal, and that
the hand of chance marked up a Mich-
igan victory.
Ohio gave all her fighting strength
in her gruelling drives. Michigap
fought back, came from behind, Vand
emerged the victor in a dramatic last
minute climax to the struggle for the
Conference championship.
It is trite but true that -while Mich-
igan won, Ohio covered herself with
glory. The Maize and Blue has not
met a team this season which could
approach the Ohioans for hard, fast
playing, sportsmanship, and fighting
spirit. Ohio and Michigan were
equals in everything-but the final
score. Even this did not dim Ohio's
spirit and to the University which can
go down to defeat with the courteous
gesture that was Ohio's-we extend
our hand."

PLE AS E
MAKE
ON THE
C~APS

I

i=

THE

GOOD EATS CAFETERIA
ANNOUNCES
THE ADDITION OF
Good Eats Orchestra
TO ITS
EVENING DINNER HOUR

BUS INESS
COURSES
Especially valuable to -
University Students.
Enter any time.
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State at WilliaI St.

-- -'

1-

Sample Bills-of-Fare:
T-Bone Steak............
Pork Chops..............
Salad Lunch.............
Hamburg Steak..........
Meat Pie................

50C
.40C
.40c
,1 f

All Pr'ices iI-ldc
Pot at oes yV~^ of ale
iBreaaA and Buitter
Dessert
MU' kor Coffee

GOOD EATS CAFETERIA
WILLIAM NEAR STATrE

a-

r._.__.-.. _ ___,---____-,_,

A

ASIATIC AFFAIRS(
Completion of an alliance betweenj
Russia and Turkey has compelled
consideration of Asiatic and Eastern
European affairs from another view-
point, and has given rise to numerous
predictions varying from the effect
on the signatory countries themselves
to the possibility of an Eastern reac-
tion against the "yoke of Europe."
By cementing Russo-Turkish friend-
ship which has been marred in the
last few years by the failure to con-
elude a commerical treaty, this agree-
ment is regarded as marking a new
development in Turkey's foreign af-
fairs policy. Considered internation-
ally, it paves the way for cooperation
between the two signatory nations for
the benefit of their interests as well as
those of other Asiatic people.
That the treaty formed will lead to
the formation of an union of Asiatic
nations is the opinion of part of the
Turkish press. In this connection,

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous cominunications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

REAL LOYALTY
To The Editor:
No doubt the greater portion of the
students in the University have eitherI
read or heard about the illness of
Benny Friedman's father. I wonder
if we all realize that Mr. Friedman
has been in a serious condition sincej
last Thursday and just what it reallyx
meant when both he and his wife
emphatically requested that Benny
should not be informed until after the
Ohio game. You talk about "Loyalty"
and "School Spirit!" It seems to me
that that is more genuine unfailing
"Loyalty" than we could ever hope to
have even in an institution such as
the University, and I speak not only
from the standpoint of parental love
but from the standpoint of what I
would conscientiously call REAL

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ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
Today's Contributions
"Special Co-Ed".......$ .25°
"Hon. Joseph Krashney".. .05

i
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i

Today's total...........
GRAND TOTAL ........
YET TO RAISE ........

.30
1.10
498.90

E
4

* * *
That makes Krashney's second trip
'to the Fund, and he thereby sets a
record.
* * *
RUMMAGE SALE FOR FUND
My Dear "Toasty"-
Three cheers for the High School
boy in Detroit. He will certainly be
a credit to Michigan, having already
in his young years such foresight and'
vision. I am sending you 25c-five
cents each from two co-eds, five cents,
from a loyal Michigan man and tenI
cents from me....
Let's have a rummage sale for the

.Bach
Apres un Reve ............Faure
Prelud to "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune"
......................... DeBussy
Scherzo-Pastorale ....a.....Federlein
Largo ................. .ndelI
This program includes the most
popular works of several of the most
popular composers and the Debussy
"Afternoon of a Faun" which is one
of Mr. Christian's most popular num-
bers always fills the auditorium. De-
bussy is not now regarded with the
same aspersion that he was when he
was the outstanding "ultra-modern-
ist"; and since the noisy advent Stra-
vinsky and Milhaud into the field of
modern music Debussy's esoteric
scores have become more and more
agreeable to the conventional ear.
The Faure "Apres un Reve" is one of
the finest bits from French musical
literature, and was transcribed for
the organ by Mr. Christian.
Samuel Shipman and John B. Hy-

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