100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

1926

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1926

jrlol - III lillimillilwomm"

r

K
[ISE

oil

S
'4

i.,

ON THE SIDELINES

Ward's 71 Card for the qualifying round will be ex- dent memberships and the all-campus
tended one day, for it was previously championship with the conclusion of
Tops Golf Field planned to terminate play for the stu- play today.

l

(By Associated Press)a
NEW YORK, Sept. 29.-The Yan--
kees and Cardinals today went
through the first worrkout since clos-:
ing the regular season.?
The death of Rogers Hornsby's
mother kept the Cardinal manager
from practice and cast a shadow over .--
the National League camp. Under the:-
direction of Bill Killifer, however, the --- "
St. Louis squad put in a brisk drill
at the Yankeetstadium, where the
series starts- Saturday.
The Yankees took the field for prac-
tice first today but did only light work,r -.
occupying an hour with a hitting and
fielding drill. Benny Bengough, was
a spectator and will see the big games,
although he has no chance to play.
Babe Ruth, the other Yankee casualty,
will be able to play. The big slugger
has a weak ankle, slightly strained in,
going 'after a ball along the right
field 'foul line near the close of the'
season."
The Cardinals went at their work
with enthusiasm. Rain Tuesday kept
them indoors and several of. the reg- I George Rich
ulars did not make the final trip to
Cincinnati to close the season. The backfield Saturday against Oklahoma
National league players reported A. and M.
themselves fit for the important test. Rich can punt, pass and skirt the
No further word concerning the ends, and as a result the former
likely opening game pitchers came Lakewood, Ohio, star has drawn fa-
from either end, but observers contin- vorable comment from both coaches
ued to view the prospects of a south- and fans.
paw battle between Pennockofsthe
Yankees and Sherdel of 'the Cards. 1'~ T
Football, in the opinionr of Pres. IrJt . IAINH TO HELP
JohnA. Thomas of Rutgers univer- T

By Wilton A. Simtpson
Football critics are troubling them-
selves with long discussions concern-
ing the effects of the new forward
pass ruling which was instituted by
the national committeebon rules last
winter. Michigan has become known
within the last three or four years as
a passing team and it was thought
that the new passing ruling would
seriously affect Michigan's style of
play.
Coach E. E. Wieman, assistant
director of athletics, and head
line coach of the Wolverine teams,
however, refuses to take the new
ruling with much concern and
feels that it will not affect Yost's
style of play in the least. "Michi-
gani will not pass any more than
last year; she will not pass any
less. Our passingrgame will be
the same, at least, as far as the
new ruling is concerned."
The new rule in regard to the for-
ward pass provides a penalty of five
yards on each incompleted pass after
the first. The new rule was designed
to, stop the practice of a losing team
from throwing passes wildly durinv
the last few minutes of play. But
will-it? What difference will a five
or ten yard penalty mean to a team
which is depending upon luck to win
a game in the last few minutes of
play?
Coach Wieman feels that it will
make little difference to a team
whether it kicks from the 40'.
yard line or the 40-yard line on
the fourth down. If a team has
thrown three incomnpleted passes
in succession it will suffer 10
yards in penalties, but it stilli has
an opportunity to punt on the
fourth down.
Some say the ruling will cause
drastic changes in the game, while
others strongly.refute such an argu-
ment. However, Michigan is a for-
ward passing team and we will have
an opportunity to test the rule in the
game Saturday. with the Oklahoma
Aggies.
The lchigan coaching staff stressed
kick fo mations, placing special em-
phasis 3ipon thiereturning of-punts.

Gilbert did the punting for Red team,
while Hough and Miller shared the
kicking on the Blue team. Babcock
and Whittle furnished the crowd with
a bit of excitement by returning two
punts for 25 and 50 yard runs, re-
spectively.
Coach Wleman announced yes-
terday that the Varsity would not
hold any strictly secret practices.
The students are welcome to the
practice sessions, but are asked
to cooperate when the managers
plead with them to remain on the
sidelines. Coach Wieman said,
"We have confidence in the stu-
dents and do not think that it is
necessary to hold the practices
behind closed gates. Of course, -
when we withdraw from the reg-
ular practice field to work out
our plays, we expect the specta-
tors to cooperate by not attempt-
ing to crowd onto the baseball
diamond."
Read the Want Ads

David Ward, present Michigan state
amateur champion and now a fresh-
man in the University, yesterday led
the field of 37 golfers at the end of
the first half of the 36-hole qualifying
round for the all-campus title with a
score of 34-37-71 over the difficult 33-
33-par 66 Ann Arbor golf course.
Fred Glover, '27, captain of the Var-
sity golf team trailed the leader by
two strokes with a good card of 73,
while only six others managed to
break 80 for the round. Turning in a
score of 75, T. H. Goodspeed held third
place temporarily and John Bergelin,
'29E, followed with a 76.
11. S. Rhodes, '28, with 77, J. W. Har-
rison, '29D, and John Glover, '28, with,
78, and C. H. Hall, '28, with 79, all
seemed in a fair way to challenge the
leaders, and are practically certain to
win one of the 15 memberships offered
by the club. Many others were just
outside of the select group to break
80, and these will undoubtedly make
a bid to overtake the leaders.
According to an announcement
made by Fred Glover, students will be
permitted to play two rounds over the
Ann-Arbor course until tomorrow
night. This means that the time limit

FOOTBALL
Ypsilanti Cent hr~il - jj,
.Ann Arbor
WINES FIELD
Admission 50c
Friday, Oct. 1, at 3:30 P. M.
44"""""" s""""""wa ieinah----wa

,:1

I I

i

All popuzlar Iirogile imodels on dm pwiy

a

if

I
1

:,.
4

.
MARTIN HALLER
Furnihure 112 East Liberty St. Rugs

33

E;

at
GUY WOOLFOLK & CO.
336 Soutih State Street
Ann Arbor, Mich."

v'

H andsome Gate Leg Tables
Wth Solid Mahoganq or Solid Walnut
Tops-Conve'nient Drawer---Convenient
$19.85
C '(I 1

4i
. ;
e
Fi ..

4'
ii
9:
45
r5
A
45
'ft
.
N,
:5
St
r
F

lasts and Patterns exclusive our own des{in

i-C.

1 4

WHITEHOUSE~& HARDY
pt INCORPORATED
BROADWAY AT 40" STREET 144 WEST 42"D STREET
METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE BLDG. KNICKERBOCKER BUILDING
. e 84 BROADWAY-AT WALL STREET o

m I I.,

I

N."
{ ii
-b-
.,-'~

r

16

w~am"Mmi

I

When

31
4

Iv

peg

-to

were in flower
PRINCE ALBERT has been the campus favorite
since the days of long-haired fullbacks, high
,button shoes, turtle-neck sweaters, and hand-
painted dormitory cushions. This same won-
$4erful tobacco is even more popular in these
odays of plus-fours.
And no wonder. Throw back the hinged
lid of the familiar red tin and release that rare
aroma of real tobacco! Tuck a load into your
pipe and pull that fragrant P. A. smoke up the
stem! That's Prince Albert, Fellows! Nothing
like it anywhere,
When problems press and your spirits slip
ever into the minus column, just get out your
jimmy-pipe and load up with this really friendly
tobacco. .P. A. is so kind to your tongue and
throat and general disposition. Buy a tidy aed
'tin todayEi

s '.a wY

14
'
4-
t,'
{F
AY
eI
i
b.
,
'it
r',
'tt
,
-N

C.'
S.

I1

- j

/

11

-1

I

P. A.-,s* old evetywhwa. 1w
tidy red tins, pound and-al/-
Pound tin humidors, and
pound crystal-glass humidors
with sponge-moistener top.
.*nd 'always with every bit
o.1 bite and parch removed by
!he'1Prince Albert process.

C]

,I

Ei WO 1

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan