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November 11, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-11

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PAGE THRE

THURSDAY, , NOVBMBER 11, 1926

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

kliN 4, 'm w i i w QiW4

WORKS OF ANN ARBOR ARTISTS ARE CONGRESS MAY
SHOWN IN ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALLHVE TAX WARr
V TAX WAR

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Exhibits of the private work of Ann past three, years, has several oils on Cooli-ge Leaves Tax Refund Proposal
Arbor artists and amateurs are being exhibition. His wife, Margaret H. To 'ongress With Request
shown in the west gallery of Alumni Chapin, instructer in the University
Memorial hall. The exhibition, which High school, has portrait pictures of To Avoid Politics
opened , Monday, will continue until smnall girls.
November 21, inclusive, and is open Dr. Lombard has etchings of Maine (By Associated Press)
from 1:30 to 5:00 o'clock week days scenery. His "Birches in Triscote's WASHIINTON, Nov. 10.-With con-
and from 2:00 to 5:00 Sundays. The Gully" and "After Glow" are the re- gressional war clubs alrcady lifted
exhibition is free to students of the sults of new experiments in brushing for a tax battle at the approaching
University, to children of the schools, the etching plate to produce the de- short session of Congress, President
and to members of the Ann Arbor Art sired effect. Jean Paul Slusser, in- Coolidge today left his, tax refund pro-
association. Others will be charged a structor ii drawing and painting in the Coolidge Tuesday left his tax refundI
fee of 25 cents. College of Architecture, has batiks, proposal to bhe mercy of the legisla-
The exhibition is not a University screens, tapestries, and linoleum cuts tois with a suggestion for non-partis-
project, bit is sponsored by residents on exhibit, an consideration.
of Ann Arbor. Faculty members, ys The official spokesman at the WhiteE
however, constitute a large portion of Mary 0.ang in inst Archit in free House declared the President would
porionothand drawing in the Architectural:
the contributors. school, has portraits with negroes as leave it entirely up to Congress if and
The exhibit, in the opinion of pr.sm how tax relief should be given at this
subjects. Aside from his portrait of
Warren P. Lombard, who is president Dean Cooley, Leon A. Makielski has time.
of the association and also Professor Mallory of the rhe- Moreove3r, he said, the executive had
Emeritus of Physiology, is the largest pictures of Prof.Mallor of the rhe not finally endorsed the program by
top. ic department andi of Mrs. Carl D e-otfiarlyMellndora e rdtoframbu
and best of the exhibits given by the Secretary Mellon for a credit of about
Ann Arbor Art association. There are fe ha , 2 as 12i per cent on next years income
editor of the Michigan Alumnhs, has cnonexyarsiom
358 exhibits, of which the majority tchosen campus subjedts fo is etch- tax payment, rather than an immedi-
were produced by faculty of the Archi- ate refund. He will talk with mem-
tectural school, but there is consider-ings. bers of the House where the legisla-
able work by amateurs. Mrs. Field- Of the student producers, there is tion must originate, before fixing upon
ing H. Yost is among the amateur pro- John Kock of the Ann Arbor High a final plan.
ducers, and has an oil exhibition of school and Edwafd Goetz, '29E, Fred- I
decorative flowers. eric Wykes, '27, and Herbert Watt,
Dr. Myron B. Chapin, instructor in '27E. READ THE WANT ADS
architecture, besides hanging the var-
ied exhibits, a task he has had for the

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Student Journalists
To Meet At Illinois
Editors sand business managers of!
college publications throughout the
country will meet November 18-20 at
Champaign, Ill., for the second annual
National College Press Congress. Five
hundred invitations have been mailed
to student representatives of colleges
in every state.
Speakers who are specialists in col-
lege publication work will address the
meetings, and round table discussion
will be held.
A complete business and social pro-
gram is being arranged with the Illi-
nois-Ohio football game as the feature.
REED SPEAKS ON
CITY GOVERNMENT
Prof. Thomas H. Reed read a paper
on '\Government by the Metropolitan
District," before a meeting of the Na-
tional Municipal league at St. Louis,
Mo., yesterday.
Professor Reed left Ann Arbor Tues-
day to attend the meeting of the lea-
gue. He will spend today in Chicago,
and return to meet his classes to-
morrow morning.
WASHINGTON.- Sen. William B.
McKinley of Illinois, is critically ill
and he may not attend further Senate
sessions.

JUNIORS
--Who have paid $10, $20, or $30 on their Life Membership, will
be credited with $10 more from this Fall's tuition, also the same
amount from any succeeding year spent in the University;
Who are fully paid Life MVembers, will be refunded $10 from
this Fall's tuition, also any other Union fees .paid in succeeding years
at the University;
-Who have not signed a life membership pledge will be given
$10 credit from this Fall's tuition toward such a pledge;
Provided, the Union amendment passes, November 17.
Vote "Yes" at the Aniendment Meeting.
I
FRESH HOT BISCUITS AND
RIGH CHICKEN GRAVY
-20c -
A Wonderful Noon Lunch.
Tasty and Satisfying-and Not Too Weaxy.
COOPER'S KITCHENETTE
339 utft tate St. Over 1Derrill Pratt's

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all

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Starling
Today

Non
Shoving

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p i rogra

MARY
ASTOR

LLOYD
HUGHES
iI ile stage Suvcsl ky
OWEN DAVIS

DAVID
TORRENCE

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sf,
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The stag at eve
THIS fflow missed out on a heavy date tonight
by the close margin of one phorie-call. But

S
j
,
i

don't waste pity on him.

He has his jimmy-

pipe and a tidy red tin of Prince Albert .. .
grand little pals in time of stress.
When that cool, comforting smoke comes
curling up the pipe-stem, troubles evanesce with
every puff. For P. A. is The National Joy
Smoke in fact as well as phrase. Cool as a

money-lender.

Sweet as a check from home.

P. A. is sold everywhere in
tidy red tins, pound and half-
pound tin humidors, and
pound crystal-glass humidors
with sponge moistener to;
And always with every bit
of bite and parch removed by
the Prince Albert process.

Fragrant as a pine-grove on a damp mtorning.
You'll like Prince Albert better than any
other tobacco you ever packed into a pipe.
You'll like the friendly way it treats your tongue
and throat. You'll like the way it helps you over
the rough spots. Buy a tidy red tin today and see!
. I a A ,wat.

Stage- Van Bibber Comedy
HARRY SHANNON, Jr.- "TENNIS

I

,

i llNlil l ! , lllllil lillliilill 11

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