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November 09, 1926 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1926

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JOEST[INO KAROW TIE
"qaineia ; Thunderbolt" Scores Three
TOUCIdO , , Ohio Haliback
lnuaiiirsIdle
MOLENDA RANKS THIRD
Plunging his way to three touch-
downs against Iowa, Herb Joesting,
the Minnesota thunderbolt, bucked
his way into a tie with Marty Karow
of Ohio State as the leading Confer-
ence scorer with a total of 60 points.
He was fortunate in the fact that Ohio
was idle last Saturday, this fact pre-
venting Karow from increasing his
total.
Because of a strained leg that forc-
ed him to quit early in the game, "Bo"
Mdlenda of Michigan failed to add to
his total, and dropped to third place.
Scoring a touchdown, a field goal,
and four points after touchdowns,
Captain Benny Friedman of the Wol-
verines advanced from fourteenth to
eighth place in the standings. Fried- i
man has kicked 10 consecutive points
after touchdowns, and is only one field
goal behind the famous "Frosty"
Peters, of Illinois, whose specialty is
in that department.
Minnesota, led by Joesting, Peplaw
and Nydal, leads the Conference In
points scored with a total of 182 in
six games. Michigan follows with
167, and Ohio State is a close third,
with 160.
Northwestern shows the best de-
fensive record in six games with only
nine points registered by the enemy.
Michigan is also second in this de-
partment, allowing but 16 markers,
none of which were scored by a Con-
ference team. Illinois is third with
26, and Ohio has given 27.
Leading Conference scorers: '

KAPPA NU LOSES
SPEEDBALL FINAL,
Kappa Nu bowed to the onsau i=
of a slightly superior Delta Sigma Ph
team in the finals of the interfratern-
ity speedball championship tourna--
ment yesterday at south Ferry field
by a score of 9 to 6.I
J. Nathan's pass to Holz:nan into
the end zone resulted in the first score
of the bitterly fought contest, Kappa
Nu retaining a ,3-2 advantage at the
end of the first half.
Play was even until four minutes
before the final whistle, the score re-
maining at 6-4, in favor of Kappa Nu.
At this time baker booted a brilliant;
field goal for the deciding three pointsj
after a mad scramble in front of the
Kappa Nu goal line.
Another pass from Iartwig to Wor-
Brock with less than a minute to play
gave the Delta Sigma Phi squadltwo i
additional points, bringing the final
count to 9 to 6. '
On the defense the work of Holz-1
man, for Kappa Nu, and Baker, for
Delta Sigma Phi, was one of the fea-!
tures of the keenly-fought play
throughout the entire contest.(
Almost 100 interested spectators
watched the games which was preced-
ed by the championship encounter be- I
tween the sophomores and the fresh-1
men of the literary college for the in-I
terelass title, the sophomores winning
15. to 3.
Yearling Swimmers 1
Compete At Union
Freshmen swimmers were afforded1
an opportunity to show their abilityl
in a meet yesterday afternoon in the_
Union pool, held under the auspices
of the intramural department, provid-t
ing Matt Mann, swimming coach, with
valuable information concerning the
yearling material.
Results follow: 25 yard free style,t
Walker, Goldsmiths Gitman, time-
:11.4; 25 yard breast stroke, Geikie,1
Vose, Fechheimer; time-:15.5; 50
yard free style, Walitas, Goldsmith,'
Fossum; time-:26; 25 yard back
stroke, Frantz, Warner; time-:14.6;i
100 yard free style, Reif, Powers;t
time-: 66; 50 yard breast stroke,t
Thompson, Vose, Fechheimer; time-F
:35.6; 50 yard back stroke, Shorr,l
Warner; time-:34.2; 220 yard freec
style, Hosmer, Goldsmith., Powers;f
time:2:56.t
BUFFALO.-Pat Dougherty, once
famous as an outfielder was reported:
"doing nicely" today, following a seri-
ous operation.1

HISTORIC FERRY FIELD PASSES INTO TRADITION

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HARRIERS TO RUN
IN MEET TODAY
Wolverine harriers will have their
last test race before the Conferencel
m1eet at 4 :15 o'clock this afternoon d
Vhen the entire squad1 will engage
cross country men from Ypsilanti
Normal school. This will be run over
the regular five mile course starting
on Ferry field and ending on the Uni-
versity golf club course. ''
Coach* Stephen J. Farrell was well
pleased with the showing of the team
in the triangular meet Saturday, and
although the Wolverines were forced
to bow to Ohio, Farrell believes his
men have an excellent chance to turn
the tables in the Big Ten race Nov.
20 at Minneapolis where Wisconsin
will be the big favorite for high hon-
ors.
Monroe, a sophomore runner who
took sixth place 'last Saturday, has
shown great improvement and Coach
Farrell looks on his work as most
gratifying.
EAD TIE WANT ADS

KENTUCKY BDS FOR
K NT C YB - MC MILLINAS COACH
(By Associated Press)
LEXINGTON, Ky., Nov. 8.-A move-
ment is on foot among certain alumni
of Kentucky State university to ob-
tain the services of Alvin Nugent
("Bo") McMillin, coach of the Geneva
college squad and former all-Ameri-
can quarterback, as a fobtball coach
of the Kentucky team.
McMillin, who spent the week-end
ii Lexington, made no statement con-
cerning the project.
McMillin attained fame as a quar-
terback of the Centre college football
team which made such a brilliant
campaign against several large uni-
versities of the country.
After his graduation, McMillin took
up coaching. From Centenary college,
at Shreveport, La., he went'to Geneva
college, in Pennsylvania, where he,
in two seasons, developed a team that
defeated Harvard,
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

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(By Associated Pes,) Ilimendinger, Benbrook, Blott, Cat- Michigan football was enacted. It
When the final whistle sounded at let. Craig, Douglas, Maurice and was there that the title of "flurry Up"
the end of the Michigan-Wisconsin Robert Dunne, Edmunds, Goebel, was bestowed upon Coach Yost and
football amSaturday, it marked the $ ughitt, Kipke. Kirk, the Knodes,i there that the iamous point-a-minute
1from the game of the i Magidsohn, Maulbeteh, Pontius, Ray- were trained. It was there that Iles-
l , ,ingnesford, Roby, Slaughter, Cedric ton made his tireless marches. Tom
bit of turf known as Ferry Field. Wita |Smith, Steketee, Uteritz, Vick, Stan ilammond goaled, Neil Snow punted.
its passing will go to football oblivion, Wells and "Truck" Wieman. Norcross, Graver and Weeks directed
Isome of the tradition,maly of the As the new field will have thrown line crushing attacks and "Germany"
memories, a bit of the glory that has r aSchnitz and Shorts and Gregory and
over it a pnrt of the tradlitions of Idaddoc1 iliale histor s iemn
been Michigan's during the days that ilichigan, so the field abandoned Sat- tory as inemen.
the band in the flapping maize capes urday received from another gridiron It was there that McGuggn sptrred
has played "The Victors," with its apart of the halo of Michigan's bril- n th Mihhigan team to its 107 ViC-
hatitory over Iowa, tehgetsoeee
haunting refrain of "The Champions liant football past. This former field, mae a estrce gaer
of the West." running along State street at a point was erethernsContrence game
Next year another field will take south of the Yost Field house, was hbeaten 130 toh0 for Michigan's high
its place, with the name of Ferry field st eds the ealy in .rei-est score.
los fields for the rather unorganized
possibly, but not probably, blazoned ,ants of-thtdnv ,mc ,,. ~ Ferry Field passed on as the home

,

TP.
Joesting, Minnesota ..60
Karow, Ohio State ..60
Molenda, Michigan ..44
Peters, Illinois......38
,eplaw, Minnesota ..38
Nydal, Minnesota ....38
Kutsch, Iowa......36
Friedman, Michigan ..35
Gustafson, Northw'rn.32
Lewis, Northwestern. .31

T.
10
10
7
3
4
5
5
2
5
4

FG. PG.
0 0
0 0
0 2
4 8
3 51
0 84
0 6i
3 14
0 2
1 4

over its gates; but something will be
lost, as something may be gained -by
the transition. That something that
seems inherent in man, to pay rover-
ence to the spot where mighty things
have been done, will not be transfered
-it will always be a part of the field
where Wisconsin and Michigan bat-
tIed Saturday.
The present turf was first used as
a football field 20 years ago from last
Saturday. In the midst of a torren-
tial rain that day in 1906 Michigan and
Illinois played the first game on Ferry
Field turf. Michigan won, as it had
a habit of doing in those days against
Illinois, the score being 28 to 9.
Curtis, tackle, captained that Mich-
igan team. Patrick and Eyke were
the other men who appeared at tackle.
Graham and Davidson were the
guards, Harry Hamond, Newton and
Lowell were the ends, Clement the
center, With Lowell also playing at
that position. Johnny Garrells was
the fullback and McGoffin and Rum-
ney at the halves. Workman played
quarterback with Bishop as his un-
derstudy.
Other players who have made his--
tory on this field include Allerdice,

the campus about where the Water-
man gymnasium now stands. When
the game became popular so that ad-
missions might be charged, there was
the old Washtenaw County Fair
Grounds. As football at Michigan was
more or less informal until 1890 the
same present confine of Ferry field has
witnessed most of the games and the
making of most of the football tradi-
tions of Michigan.
It was upon the old gridiron at the
south aclp of Ferry Field that the moat
spectacular part of the history of

of Michigan football Saturday to give
place to a larger, possibly better field,
but parts of its tradition nerer will be
transferred.
SAN IRANCTISCO.-The amendment
which sought to bring back horse rac-
ing in California, suffered a heavy de-
feat, by approximately 150,000 votes.
BUCK IIANON, W. Va.-West Vir-
ginia Wesleyan college, has been in-
vited to play Brown university at
Providence, R. I., next year.

Corduroy
Coats
Tan, brown, blue
grey - )vool lined
slicker lined sheep
lined - alprices
' $7.50 $8.50 $i0,00
~WX6PE.COMPAY
for 1/len An. i~(

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r/

Genuine

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Peccary
Pigskin

$5.00

LEADING EASTERN SCORERS

Gloves
F. W GROSS, 309 S. Main

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T.P.
Wilson, Army ........78
Wilson, Lafayette . . ..72
Lane, Dartmouth .....69
Madden, Columbia ..64
Strong, New York U.. 6
Carr, Syracuse ......59
Shaughnessy, Colgate.58
Graham, Fordham ...55
Green, Penn State .. .54
Weston, Boston Col.54

T.
10
12
11
7
6
8
8
6
9
9

FG. PG.
0 18
0 0
0 3
2 16
3 16
0 11
0 10
3 10
0 0
0 0

Michigan attempted nine forward
passes during the first half, corn-
pleting five and having none inter-
cepted. Wisconsin attempted only one
heave in the first two periods, which
was blocked.1
HIGH CLASS
SHOE REPAIRING
Done at Reasonable Prices
Stop in for
That Shoe Shine
SHOE REPAIR SHOP
G. 1Y1. MORRIS
3011 S. State
HEAD OF :LIBERTY,
Whitney Theatre
Wed. Nov. 10th
(Zaised on b esv n e f
jkeNatioral Gale
of Laughter/
=1AWOUS cOMEDY OF THE WORLWS CREE!
NOTE-This is the Chicago Coin-
hpany and Ann Arbor is one of
thie few smaller cities getting

SCOLLEGIATE CLOTHES SHOP
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155}}}pp'' L 4 s
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Smart Stiled Clothes For Co1Iee Men'
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CORLT T OVERCOAT
The thing to wear at the Ohio game, both from
the standpoint of style and comfort, is a Corbett specially
tailored overcoat. They are made from imported woolens
of the latest shades and cut with broad shoulders and neat
lines. Priced very reasonably at

Langrock Clothes
for
college
attire

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