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November 07, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-07

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'I

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SU~NDAY, NOVEMBI'M 7, 1926

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Menmbers of Western Conference Editorial
Aswrciation.
The Associated Ps is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credIited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate,
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.'
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00..
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.'
Editor. ............W. Calvin Patterson
CityEditor............Irwin A. Olian
News ditos.. Frederick Shilito
News Editors........ Philip C. Brooks
'Xmen's Editor........ ..Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
ie graph Edior..........Morris Zwerdling
241usic and Drama........ Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Char les Behymer Ellis Merry
Calton Champe Staiford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
James Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger J HBenryThurnau
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters

41

Mar.on Anderson
Alex Bochnowski
jean Campbell
Martin J. Cohn
Clarence Edelson
William Emery
J ohn Friend
:ubert Gessner
Elaine Gruber
MortonG B Icove
Paul Kern
Milton Kirshbaum
Frvin LaRowe

G. Thomas McKean
Adeline O'Brien
Kenneth Patrick
Morris Quinn
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larian Welles
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Sherwood Winslow

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED, JR.
:,;tcrtising ........ . Paul WV. At.teId
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A ertising..............Thowas Sunderland
Advertisimg. . .George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation...............T. Kenneth Haven
' iblication........... .John H. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants

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L. J. VandTuyl
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Esther Booze,
Hilda Binzer
Dorothy Carpenter
Marion A. Daniel
Beatrice Greenberg
Selma M. Janson
Marion Kerr
Marion L. Reading
Harriet C. Smith
Nance Solomon
Florence Widmaier

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1,926
Night Editor-CARLTON G. CHAMPE
THE UNFRIENDLY SENATE
The test that makes or breaks comes
only with adversity and opposition,
and it will be just such a test to
which President Coolidge will be sub-
jected for the remainder of his term
as he faces a hostile Senate. It cer-
tainly sloes not require the same high
type of executive to put into effect a.
legislative program with a sympa-
thetic Congress, as it does with one
that requires persuading, convincing,
consolation, and campaigning for
every progressive step that the bill
takes.t
This last Senate boasted a Republi-
can majority of 16-a very workable
1 legislative body for a Republican Pres-
ident. The present Senate will be so
I k equally divided, that counting the in-
rgem Republicans, who can be
ounted on to vote with the Democrats
"ore often than their own party, more
sxone proposal coming from the
hite IHouse will have to be railroad
ed through by the sheer character
and personality of President Coolidge
-or fail by the lack of these same.
executive qualities.
More than one President who has
boen acclaimed an efficient govern-
mental head during the term when he
bad a Congress of his own party, to
whom he could go with the assurance
that his legislative program would
meet with no difficulties, has fallen
under the grueling test of a hostile
majority. The next two years will tell
whether President Coolidge is the ag-
i'e"1 ve, convincing leader who is able
to execute his policies in the face of
strong opposition, or whether he lacks
some of the qualities of political
leadership that have distinguished the
careers of such men as Washington,
Lincoln, Roosevelt, and Wilson.
MANDATORY POWERS
With the desire for sources of raw
materials an impelling motive for Ger-
many to regain her former colonies,
f Ibe views of the Reich government re-
.u in the mandatory system set'up
over former German territory at the
close of the World war are coming in
conflict with those of the powers hold-
ing the mandates .
Recent developments at Geneva in-
dicate a.,tendency on the part of the
latter to regard their position in these
countries as more or less sovereign.

distribution of mandates because she
has special treaties with practically
all the mandatory powere whereby
American citizens are granted econ-
omic equality with the citizens of
other countries .
In meeting this question, the League1
of Nations will be confronted with one
of the gravest problems before it. Ter-s.
ritorial disputes, handled in a bung- I
ling manner, have often led to serious
consequences. As in similar situa-
tions which will develop in the return
of the world to normalcy, the foreign
affairs officials of each country will be
called on to use the utmost tact and
sound judgment.
ECONOMIC FACTORS
Regardless of which side of th&
fence one may be on concerning the
prohibition modification question, the
economic effects of the present era of
aridity should receive consideration
by the fair-minded in deciding what
attitude to adopt toward a change.
Roger W. Babson recently com-
pleted a summary of the economic ef-
fects of prohibition, which findings
have been supported by two economic
authorities, Professors Irving Fisher
of Yale and Thomas Nixon Carver of
Harvard. According to the report,
the $2,000,000,000 which formerly paid
the nation's intoxicating beverage bill
has been diverted into commercial
channels and is partially responsible
for the present activity in business. It
is believed that only ten per cent of
this sum is still being paid for liquor,
leaving $1,800,000,000 which has been
put into commerce and industry. It
is estimated that of this sum, twenty-
five per cent is being put into banks
or. savings institutions, twenty-five
per cent into homes and housing,
twenty-five per cent into automobiles,
and the remainder into miscellanepus
merchandise, recreation, education,
and amusement.
Few will deny Professors Fisher
and Carver positions of authority in
their field. Roger Babson would have
nothing to gain by a distortion of his
findings. These economic facts and
figures may well be kept in mind be-
sides the debatable questions of in-
dividual rights when considering pro-
hibition modification.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants wil however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
"CHINA"
To The Editor
In your editorial on China last
Wednesday, you made a comparison
between Silas Strawn's speech before
the Chicago Chamber of Commerce
about the present situation in China
and my article in the last issue of the
Michigan Chimes about the present
struggle in China. You said that the
conflicting views show how hard it is
for people to understand the Chinese
problem and how inadequate our pres-
ent knowledge is on the same. You
further said that the American gov-
ernment is very wise at present to
adopt a policy of "Watchful Waiting"
in regard to China.
As I see it, the only difference be-
tween my view and Mr. Strawn's viev
is that he believes that China has only
herself to blame for her present trou-
ble and all talk about the existence of
unequal treaties and Western im-
perialism as the causes for her pres-
ent trouble is pure bunk, while I.
though I frankly admit that China
herself is to be blamed for her present

trouble, yet hold t-hat the existence
of unequal treaties and the imperial-
istic policy of Western nations have
bound China hand and foot in such a
way that she simply cannot readily
set her house in order. Mr. Strawn
wants to give a clean bill of health to
the Western nations that have exacted
those unequal treaties and special
privileges from China, the existence
of which has so crippled China's na-
tional development, and contributed to
the prolongation of her present trou-
ble; while I give no party a clean bill
of health. I believe that every dis-
interested observer and student of the
Far Eastern situation will hold the
same view as I do. The facts are
there. Nobody can disprove them.
Let the reader imagine America or
France to be in the same position as
China is today, with the existence
of those unequal treaties and special
privileges and with constant foreign
interference into her foreign politics
as I have referred to in my article.
He will get a fairly good idea how
China has been handicapped to re-
store and to achieve internal peace
and order.
What China wants today from the
Western powers is not a policy of
watchful waiting but a strictly "Hands
Off" policy. It means to let China
alone and let her work out her own
salvation in a way she sees best. It

OASTED ROLLV
ANYWAY
WE5SAW
THE SKY
If you want to find out who won
the game, turn, for a change, to the
front page. You will find that page
one of the most interesting in the pa-
per, if you really get acquainted with.
it. * .
Unless you have a seat in the fourth
row of YY you will never know what
a magnificent view of the concrete end
wall of the south stand you get
from there.
* S *1
And at times you get a fine view of
the tops of the goal posts rising over
a sea of bright colors and alumni. It
is a sight to inspire a poet-unless he
likes to watch a football game.
* * *
We almost saw the flag as it was
raised to the top of the pole, but a co-
ed with one of those hats that flow
all over the landscape got up in front
of us.
ADMIRAL IXZO ARRIVES IN TIME
The bands came on the field and the
late comers obstructed everyone's
view of them. BUT ADMIRAL IXZO
WAS FORTY MILES AWAY.
* * *
The Walter Camp ceremonies came
to a conclusion with the playing of the
national anthem, while alumni told
how the game last year had been
won by their support. BUT ADMIRAL
IXZO WAS THIRTY MILES AWAY.
* * *
Well, anyway, he got there. We
haven't the nerve to stretch out such
an obvious plot. He arrived just as
the teams were lining up. A big cheer
arose as he entered the field.
* * *
- "YOU MAY SIT HERE...."
All students should take warning
from that poster over in Graham's
window on State street. It clearly
points out where students will be next
year in the new stadium. "If you
don't buy a bond you may be here" it
says and points to the outside of the
wall, which by the way looks rather
substantial. Well, anyway, if we get
tickets there it will save us the long
long hike down there.
* * *
RACE STARTS MONDAY
The big race between Admiral Ixzo
and Kernel starts Monday at 5 A. M.
from in front of the ZoologyMuseum.
* *
FROM THE TRAINING QUARTERS
Kernel's Kamp, Nov. 6.-The phan-
tom mystery horse, Oscar, (pronounc-
ed Ah-skir) rounded off his training
here this afternoon for the long race
to Columbus. NOTICE: OSCAR DID
HIS TRAINING EXCLUSIVELY ON
ROLLED OATS. (Adv.)
An extremely high strung nervous
condition and slight overconfidence
are the only things that his trainers
have to worry about at present.
NOTICE: OSCAR DRINKS POSTUM
EXCLUSIVELY. (Adv.)
Skull practice, followed by a brief
curry-comb drill, were the features
of the last day of training. NOTICE:
EVEN OSCAR CRIES FOR FLETCH-
ER'S CASTORIA. (Adv)
Representatives of the Press were
barred and Oscar will spend the last
night at Barton Hills, away from the
excitement of the town.
Kernel.
* * *
IXZO ISSUES STATEMENT
I am glad of the opportunity af-
forded me to show the speed of my

horse in a race to Ohio State. After
my trip East to the Navy game it will
be minor league stuff, but I will show
up this upstart, Kernel. My horse is
named "Wolverine."
(Signed) Admiral Ixzo.
ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
Today's contributions
I - Also Yesterday's
I "Batsin de Belfry"....... .02
Today's total ..............02
GRAND TOTAL....... ...60
YET TO BE RAISED ... 499.40
* * * s
FROM ONE OF TODAY'S CONTRIBS
Hey, Hay:
Moved by your fund for ROLLS'
stadium bond, I am sending a two-
cent stamp to put on the letter in
which you send the check when the
total is reached.
Batsin de Belfry.
* s
FAREWELL EAST STANDS
It was with a feeling of deep regret
that we left the dear old East stands
for the last time yesterday. As we
look back over the years spent in that
memory-filled place, it is with a catch
in our throat. We can still picture
that game back in 1925 when the ball

MUSIC
1 A "
DRAMA
"Tea For Three"
A Review, by Robert Mansfield.
If one must become personal, my
sympathy is largely with Phyllis
Loughton. Roi Cooper Megrue needs
no word of mine-the lines are wholly
adequate, save only the last few. In-
sofar as direction is concerned, last
night's production of "Tea for Three'
was quite up to the ultimate issima of
campus dramatics, but when it came
to lines-well, they hung it up there
with the aid of convenient forgetters
To John lassberger my dilapidated
fedora is respectfully raised. One
finds but seldom such distinctly pol-
ished interpretation, be the actor pro-
fessional or amateur. His lines were
clearly given so that no bit of their
purpose was lost, and while I must
condemn him for imperfect memory
the same breath must commend hi
artistic-. repose. Hle "covered up'
(boxing term) most amazingly well.
The plot concerned a most usual tri-
angle, but succeeded in departing from
the more ordinary banalities. Philip
makes alternate bows as hero and
villain, his exact position being ques-
tionable until the final curtain when
he turns out to be neither. Person.
ally, I would have preferred a genuine
death to knock the earlier comedy into
some forgotten limbo, but the happy
ending ridden American audience
must be pleased, and comedy holds the
stage. After all no one must be
shown as permanently immoral.

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Atmosphere

t

Phyllis Loughton, Director
At the outset I declared sympathy
with Phyllis Loughton. Sympathy, I
make tardy haste to add, for thelack
of co-operation in learning lines on
the part of the actors. The direction
really made the piece the success it
was. There was no halting action,
and the characters moved about in
their mock world entirely at ease and
without the affectation which so often
spoils the amateur production. In all
the productions which Miss Loughton
has directed this one particular fea-
ture has made for a contented audi-
ence. She has the enviable ability of
projecting her characters across the
footlights and beyond the realm of the
theatre, making her high comedy so
noisily high that her p'ainstakingly
created illusion is broken before the
audience has arrived at the point of
taking the play too seriously. Posi-
tion on the stage is frequently every-
thing in putting across a potent line,
and Miss Loughtonehas quite evidently
learned her Bonstelle lessons well in
this line as in others.
Minna Miller did really fine work in
her role as Doris, the devoted but
bored wife. Sharing with the other
players in getting her lines a bit mixed
at intervals, she more than made up
for her failing in the quick mobility
of facialexpression which made her
part so wholly human. She did the
well known smile at the gentleman
alias "aside" in theatrical copy without
marring in the least the author's in-
tention, and the way she dodged the
sunlight in the first act was more than
'arf a joy.
James Martin was good, Vera Johns-
ton sobbed until she nearly shattered
ear-drums in the back rows, and Har-
lan Christy did his usual good work as
the valet-doing even better than
usual this time. Unless I am mis-
taken the two menials of the cast were
the only ones who did not forget their
lines. Despite the fact that they had
very few words to remember in se-
quence they are to be congratulated.
Altogether it was not the best thing
Comedy Club ever did, but was cer-
tainly far from the worst. Direction,
as I have observed before, by Phyllis
Loughton.
* * *
MUMME RS
The following women have been
elected to membership in Mummers,
Women's Dramatic Society:
Pauline Jacobs, '29; Wilma New-
becker, '28; Constance Sidder, '28;
Shirley King, '29; Blossom Bacon, '30;
Florence Watchpocket, '29; Dorothy
Williams, '29; Margaret Zahn, '29 :
Virginia Trowbridge, '30; Alletta Mor-
ton, '29; Helen Workman, '30; Janice
Undem, '30 ; Sophia Stolarsk, '30;
Hulda Schaffer, 'spec.
Mummers has at present an active

t

I

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

is the only word that can describe
the air of refined intimacy that pre-
vails at our parties. The irresistible
music, the smooth; glassy floor, the
tinkle of refreshment glasses, all
combine to give to our guests that
feeling of relaxation and whole-
hearted enjoyment that they want.
At no time do the hours interfere
with studies, and, in your hours of
leisure, the rhythmical croons of
Jack Scott's "Wolverines" call
you to
Granger' s -Academy

I

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