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November 05, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-05

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v

PAdFbUR

THE MICHICAN DAILY

PRITDAY, NOVE~MBER 5, 1920

~jh ~ ~ ha~an~ atj Iceased was 64 when he was relieved
of his long sufferings, he did not die
"before his time."' He had four de-j

Published every iorning except Monday
duigThe L-mversty year by the Board in
oJ Stud Publications.
Members of "Western Conference Editorial
Association.
'e \ssoeiated Ps is exclusively en-
iecd lt the use for republication of all newsI
+ }hescr edited to it or not otherwise
tb pn per and the local news pub-
L itered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
hi c i. S econd class matter. Special rate
t cgranted s by Third Assistant Post-
iaster General.
Subiwription by carrier. $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Oftices:Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
niard Street.
" I'boties : Editorial, 4925 ; business. 21314.

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor... ......W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor..-...e. ...Irwin A. Olian
- Frederick Shillito
News Editors.....1..- Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor... ".........Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpsoni
Telegraph Editor...........No;-ris Zwerdlip
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. WallJr.
'Night Editors
Charles Behynier - Ellis Merry
Carlion (hanpe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chambeflin, Courtland C. Smith
ames Herald Crssam A. Wilson
tj sTj~apt t City Editors
Carl Bur , C Ienry Thurnau
n Reporters
Mar'o Ar ~on 'G. Thomas McKean
Ale , ochnows)ld Adeline O'Brien
Jean C-impbell Kenneth Patrick
Ma tin J.Coln Morris Quinn
Clarence Ldelson :Sylvia Stone
W illiamrn Lmery James Sheehan
l-In 'rieun William Thurnau
1~-- i in. -,~inin Miford Vanik
1(.1e Herbert Vedder
~-; ~c -~'#- Mariain Welles
1 Thaddeus Wasielewski
,t J1 -ht, ' Sherwood Winslow

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S1_iNESS STAFF
elephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D OLMSTED, JR.
Ad t j;' Paul W. Ai£i.td
S....,. William C. Pusch
L x~i.........Thomas Sunderland
A(I er tiu........George Ii. Annable, Jr.
01:n ltin. . ....T. Kenneth Haven
Pulication...... .........John H Bobrink
A .......rancis A. Norquist
Assistants
eurge Ahn Jr. L. J. Van Tuyl
Mcl' i, I Baer J. B. Wood
1).L1 Brown 1sther Booze
1# 11. (Cann Hilda Bizer
Danel Finley Dorothy Carpenter
11 ff Hndley Marion A. Daniel
,\.Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
1.L ue SelmaM.Janson
A. Meyer Marion L. Reading
rxcu y Rosenbum Harriet C. Smith
N iniai H tF. Spencer Nance Solomon
Harvey Talcott Florence Widmaier
Iarold' Utley'.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1926
Night Editor--4HAS .1E BELYMER
RETURN GAMES
With the scheduling this year of
two games between Minnesota and
_11c-hinigan, and between Northwestern
and Indian;, a new controversy has
booin injected into the Western Con-
ference football situation, namely, the
continuance of return games in the
same season. In some quarters, this
action is considered desirable or'even
obligated by the decision of the
coaches' conference last year.
The only legitimate reason for it,
however, is one based on excessive
transportation expenses for some foot-
ball squads in rlation to the probable
ate receis.- Otherwise the best in-
l -s of the Conference and the in-
;titntions concerned demand that re-
E 11t :ymes be jplayed in successive
Pri lnclly, r e la ti o n s established
through football rivalry should not be
Lmi:td to sinal iiques, playing each
Other frequently, hen other worthy
Opponents may be met. Conference
nt: only eight games and gen-
erally no more than five with other
sBig Ten elevens. If one institution
is to be met twice in the same season,
;t is probable that only three others
;will be scheduled. Yet, there are nine
Ii P!e (c'ams in the Big Ten to be
met.
Minnesota is one'of Michigan's most
respected comptitors, and the second
^-ame at Minneapolis will be an inter-
esting and hard fought affair; yet
most students would prefer to have
their team meet Northwestern, Iowa,
csm, Tndiana ,or Purdue. We have
iard t nleasure of playing the Goph-
ers once; but, we will not meet half
'-onn- which are eligible to win
the Conference title.
When the coaches meet this fall,
Michigan hopes that her schedule will
be made to include as many of her
friends' in the Western Conference as
p:sible, and will include them only
once.
ENDOWMENTS!
Whiei a prominent and successful
man dies before he has 'been able to
complete his life ambitions, the public
proclaims with pathos that "he died
before his time." Such popular utter-
ances contain some measure of
veracity, but they do not interrogate
into the real underlying significances
-thev ar nhilnnnhinl. not realitin

cades of maturity in which to reach
the goal of his life's ambition. No,
one can not say that Father Time
robbed him. But, one can say that
the late Professor Hussey was hinder-
ed in the realization of his life's work
by, the lack of sufficient funds endowed
by the University.
For a quarter of a century Profes-
sor Hussey dreamed, talked, and plan-
ned of establishing an observatory in
South Africa, which was to be the
largest in the southern hemisphere.
He had discovered over 1,650 double
stars and the building of the African
observatory would have been of great
benefit to astronomical science. After
a dozen years of patient waiting for
funds to carry out the work, a clear-
eyed alumnus gave an endowment.
But such a fund was not sufficient to
speed up the work and by the time the,
lenses were ready and work was to
be started, pleurisy had reached its
goal.
A University of this magnitude with
an alumni of its size and wealth
should have sufficient endowments on
hand to promote and complete, in a
reasonable time, projects that deal
with the development of science. The
advancement of astronomy should be
of sufficient importance to warrant
the attention of the University officials
who have charge of securing and ap-
propriating endowments. Professor
Hussey's years were spent in plan-
ring and dreaming of a project that
was not completed through no fault
of his nor of Father Time.
THE POLITICAL PENDULUM
A paradoxical political situation has
arisen with the appointment of the
new Chancellor of Austria-Mgr.
Ignaz Seipel-himself, a Christian So-
cialist, and successor to Dr. Rudoll
Ramek, also a Christian Socialist. But
the complexity of the affair occasioned
by this new Chancellor being of the
same party as his predecessor is
heightened by the fact that they are
both agreed on the fundamental pol-
icy of resistence to the incessant de-
mands of the organized state em-
ployees for higher pay, a policy that
resulted in the downfall of Ramek.
However, the explanation itself is
comparatively simple, for while the
Christian Socialist party has at its
command sufficient votes to control
the Chancellory, it is divided within
itself over the question of "states
rights" for the Austrian provinces as
opposed to panAustrian "centralism."
Just about two years ago, Dr. Ramek,
who is the leader of the former fac-
tion, usurped the Chancellory from
Mgr. Seipel when a similar issue, the
raising of salaries of state-employed
railroad workers, confronted the ad-
ministration . And now again the po-
litical pendulum has swung back car-
rying with it Mgr. Ignaz Seipel, at
present the sole Christian prelate to
head a civil government.
DEAD LATIN
A language is a useful method by
which to carry 'on a conversation . It
is indeed quite fortunate that nearly
everyone one meets is able to speak
English. But this is not a reason for
learning Latin.
Every month or so there is an out-
burst by a disappointed Latin teacher
or some other rare specimen to the
effect that everyone should learn
Latin in order to understand English.
And recently the Liberty magazine,
although not dogmatic on the subject,
hinted that knowledge of Latin would
be a valuable asset in the modern
business world because it is the basis
of sixty-five per cent of all our Eng-

lish words.
All this may be true. But is this a
reason for learning a language? I,
the line of logic followed through, we
might say on the same basis that one
should be forced to learn ancient
Anglo-Saxon, and Semitics likewise,
for both of these tongues contain im-
mense numbers of roots just as funda-
mental and just as directly connecter'
with the question at hand as doe,,
Latin.
If we look at the issue fairly, we a
forced to admit that the study of Latfi,
is largely a hangover, a tradition
from the Middle Ages, when nine
tenths of all the codified knowledge
of the world was in that tongue. There
is no reason to perpetrate a study, the
reason for which has died hundreds
of years ago. We have all learned
English, and learned it quite well,
without any knowledge of Latin roots.
Any study of the dead language now
would be mere study of Latin from
English roots.
Nor is it any longer true that the
assembled knowledge is mostly in the
tongue of the Romans; for there havr
been translations of every important
work ever written in Latin.
For the cultural and professional,
side of the case, without a doubt thero

OTED ROLLS
6 & 7
We received our tickets to the Wis-
consin game yesterday: two choice,
locations in the fourth row of section
YY. That's the new piee of stands
they built last year as an extension
on Yost Field house.
* * *
It has been our custom to publish a
few notes on happenings at the game
every Sunday ,but unless Harry Tillot-
son sends us a couple of good tickets
we will have to dispense with that this
week.
Harry, we dare you to trade ours
for two good tickets, and really let us
see that game Saturday.
A MATTER OF A FEW MILLS
A careful survey of the ROLLS',
STADIUM BOND FUND accounts as
published yesterday here would lead
to the conclusion that we were mak-
ing off with quite a sum by rotten
addition.
* * *
But a typographical error was made
in the listing of the donations of
"Krashney" and "Ziltch" as $.45 and
$.15 instead of $.045 and $.015.
IXZO HEADING HOME
PHILADELPHIA 5 P M NOV 4
AM ON MY WAY HOME NOW STOP
WILL MAKE WISCONSIN GAME
EASILY
IXZO
* * *
FROM THE TRAINING QUARTERS
(By Special Rolls Correspondent)
Kernel's Kamp, Nov. 4.-The horse
which will participate in the memor-
able race to Columbus has been
chosen, it was announced here today.
He will be known only as "Oscar" al-
Sthough those close to him are of the
opinion that he is a famous race-
horse under an assumed name.
Training behind closed gates was
the order of the day here; although
rumors leaking through intimated that
road work for both horse and buggy
was the strenuous program under.
taken. Confidence was expressed that
"Oscar" would run away from Ixzo
on the long grind.
Kernel.
OSCAR IN PENSIVE MOOD
This excellent picture of Oscar was
taken by a ROLLS photographer yes.
terday afternoon at the risk of his
life, since Kernel has refused to allow
visitors to view this mystery horse.
* * *

SAND
__DRAMA I
TONIGHT: Comedy Club presen
"Tea for Three" in the Mimes theater
at 8:30O o'clock. '
TONIGHT: The English Singers
ivill give the second Choral Union
concert in Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock.
"GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES"
Ever since the illuminating diary of
a professional lady was dramatized by
its authoress Anita Loos aided and
abetted by her husband John Emerson
the name of Lorelei Lee has been
household in the theater, and in the
press. The comedy is of course one
of the freaks of the show world; the
part of a Lorelei Lee may never hap-
pen again. But its success is attested
by the fact that it is now in a road
company and will be presented at the
Whitney theater next Wednesday
night. This is of additional local in-
terest since the play was given its
premier in Detroit last spring, after-
wards going to Chicago for a run and
now being presented for the season at
the Times Square theater in- New
York.
Thedcreation of the beautiful and
very dumb Lorelei is of course the
work of June Walker. And it is a tri-
bute to her that the play has suc-
ceeded. The lines in the first place
are difficult to put over since they are
familiar to everyone; it is like sing-
ing grand opera when everyone knows
the score, while there isn't a situation
in the piece. The comedy is broad at
all times, but the art of the play is
the not too obvious speeches of
Lorelei; even the most diaphanous
dialogue would be too heavy for her,
and yet it must have the semblance of
intelligent conversation-"Really, I
don't see why so many people trouble
to write about a girl like I!"
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" pre-
sented several initial difficulties, be-
sides the fact that each spectator
- would have an interpretation of the
t role which might vary with that of the
actress. In the first place, Miss
Walker was a brunette, and two wigs
had to be made to create the sunthetic
locks of the professional lady. In the
second place Dorothy's lines usually
I take most of the laughs, and this
leaves Miss Walker with embarassing
pauses to cover up with stage busi-
ness. And in third place to register
the continued vacuity that is Lorelei's
mental cosmos is difficult-more sc
than to interpret subtle and sophisti-
cated comedy. Miss Walker's analysis
of this is that it is due partly to a
rigid expression of the eyes, partly to
the wig (in the end an asset) and
partly to the empty quality of her
voice with a rising inflection on the
end of most of her lines which sends
them over the footlights still higher.
The complete interpretation of the
part is a triumph for Miss Walker, and
for the Loss-Emerson combination.
s " s

PLEASE
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CA MPUS

!GR§IHA £718
- BOOKS
Travel - Poetry - Plays - Fiction - Biographies
A Very Complete Stock of the Latest and Best Books.
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COASS THEATERI
1)1 .1ROIT
i,afayette at waye E Cad. 1100
TH E VAGABOND
KING (
Based on Justin Huntley McCarthy's
"IRomnilce
"IF I WEIIE KING"

Week-end Dances
- r
- ~ We would like t gie our regular patrons just a
~ word to the wise" about dances on the week-end of home
I -
~ ootball games. If you are planning to come, try and get
Syour ticket a little in advance, or come early in the evenin a
-to avoid disappointment.
t- -
r-
Dancing Every Wednesday, Fritday, Saturday.
your ticket a little in advance,1 or come1 early1 in11111111111111111the111evenin1gI

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'Qs
4,QULIY
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Fraternities and Sororities

Do you know that the FISCHER HARDWARE CO. carries in

stock a large variety and line of Glass Ware, Dinner Ware,
Silver Ware and Electric Table Utilities? The next time you
are in need of anything of the kind, see us.
Jno. C. Fischer Co.

Pot
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Washington Near Main

Main Near Washington

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1i
ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
Today's contributions
"Miscellaneous" ........ $ .05
"Special Co-Ed" ..........03
"Tzaul" ...........03
Today's total---------..11
GRAND TOTAL.......I.58
YET TO BE RAISED.... 499.42
* * *
Dear Tim,
As I just can't bear to see my name
listed without a thing after it, I am
inclosing my contribution to the Sta-
dium bond.
Miscellaneous.
* * *
Toasty Dear,
Here is the result of talking to a
Michigan MAN-three whole cents!
No wonder the bond doesn't go over
big. We co-eds will do it yet, and if
we do, the men can't sit in those
seats.
You got me all wrong about the
commission money. You keep that
toward the fund, see? My heart and
soul are all for our glorious Michigan
-I wouldn't think of taking a com-
mission.
Special Co-Ed.
We are proud to report that the
ROLLS' fund was more than tripled
by Wednesday's donations. We would
have announced it sooner, but we just}
got it figured out. Don't ask us what
percentage of increase it would be.
Timothy -Hay.

TONIGHT!
Two major functions in the field of
music and the drama occur tonight
when Comedy Club will present the
first of two performances of Roi
Cooper Megrue's "Tea for Three" in
the Mimes theater, while the English
Singers will present the second 'of the
Choral Union concerts in Hill audi-
torium.
The Megrue comedy is a successful
'Broadway production of years stand-
ing, and will be presented by an effici-
ent cast capably directed by Phyllis
Loughton. It might also be mentioned
that the members are all prominent
in dramatic activities: Minna Miller
the leading lady of last year's Junior
Girl's play, James Martin 'of Gilbert's
"Engaged" and another whose name
may not be mentioned, but who was
very prominently cast in Masque '
all-campus production of Jesse Lynch
William's Pulitzer Prize play "Why
Marry?" and who is a former pres-
ident of the Comedy Club.
The English Singers were the out-
standing musical novelty of last year,
and so far this season have pleased
the critics, and what is more impor-
tant, their audience. The peculiar al-
most organ-like effect of their sing-
ing (which is without accompaniment
of any kind) and their program of
folk songs, madrigals, ballets and can-
zonets will interest many.
SONGS OF TOIL AND DANGER
The most successful musical play in
New York last season was "The Vaga-
bond King" based on the story "If I
Were King" by Justin Huntley Mc-
Carthy, with the music by Rudolf
Friml. Half the women in the city
were in love with Dennis King, and
the whole town was whistling "Only
a Rose," "The Hugette Waltz" and

Corduroy and Sheepskin,
'C od ' ry n d C o a ts
For the Wisconsin Game
all colors, in Wool, Slicker or Sheepskin Lining
Are bought for less here.
Wool Blouses, Leather Coats and Jackets
For Ladies and Men
A large assortment in Tan and Grey Suede, Reindeer Flesher, Black and
Brown Napa and Horse Hide, as also Corduroys, Wool Plaids and Wool
Navakots.
Wool Blankets and Robes

i

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To keep warm during the game. All kinds, for every need.
Folding Cots and extra blankets to accommodate your
week-end guests.

GaaMmw

Tower's Slickers
All Styles and Colors for Ladies and Men,
Moccasin Packs and High-Tops
Breeches, Wool and Sweat Shirts, Puttees, Wool Hose,
Hunting Boots, Laundry Bags, Cover-Alls, Etc.

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