100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'i HTTRtDAV. Nth ' CMBE t 4, 1926

THF MTCi-TTCA1~J flATLY
________________________________________________________ I

1 r 111A' NVY""1.1A1i 4 1§2f G

,.,... ! t t

S1 hi' 4E tuh at i t l 4 sible for the discontinuance of "M"
day. Modesty is glorious, if it is sane.

Published every" morning except Monday
huring the University year by the Board iu
Centrd of -Student Publications.
4embers o Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated PfAs is exclusively en-
ticti to the use ior republication of all newsl
credited to it or not otherwise
'it, d in this naper and the local news pub-
LmeLCred at the postothce at Ann Arbor,
cliga. as second class matter. Special rate
ranted by Third Assistant Post-
y trrier, $3.75; by mail,
tun ArUur Press Building, May-
if.riaI. 4025; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
'Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMIT1 H. CADY. JR.
Editor.................W. Calvin Patterson
City'Editor...........,....Irwin A. Olian
News ditor Frederick Shillito
News Editors............Philip C. Brooks
Wsmea's I'ditor..............Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
Slt::!......... ..lxr- v*i,.
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet .Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
*James :Herald Csssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Douglas Doubleday Carl Burger
Reporters
Marion Anderson G. Thomas McKean
Alex 'Bochnowski Adeline O'Birien
Jean Cmpbell Kenneth Patrick
Martin J. Coin Morris Quinn
Clarence Edelson Sylvia Stone
William Emery James Sheehan
Johni Friend William Thurnau
Robert Gessner Milford Vanikc
Elaine Gruber Herbert Vedder
Morton B. Icove Marian Welles
Paul Kern Thaddeus Wasielewski
Milton Kirshbaum . Sherwood Winslow
Ervin LaRowe Thomas Winter
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED. JR.
Advertising............... Paul W. Arnold
Advertising...............William C. ,Pusch
Advertising..............ThomasASunderland
Advertising ...,....George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation................T. Kenneth Haven
Publication.................John H. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
G. B.. Ahp~, Jr. T.:T.. Greil Jr.
D. M. Brown A.'M. Hinilley
M. H. Cain E. L. Hulse
Harvey Carl S. Kerbaury
Dorothy Carpenter R. A. Meyer
Ma ion Daniels 'H. W. Rosenblum

i

"
I'
f
r.
f

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1926
Night Editor-ELLIS Bt MERRY
DOUBTFUL SPORTSMANSHIP.
One would have to have been pos-
.,-s,ed of an extremely thick head, not
nav had his sense of humor touched
a the altruistic and_. generous aid
which University students gave the
referee 'counting off Illini penalties in
the recent game on Ferry field.
Such charitable and unselfish giv-
ng as was there manifested would
ad one to believe that the Univer-
L has entered on a new era of
p1 laAthropy, were it not recalled that
n agnerous s.pirit has often
cu *;; . lacking in S. C. A. drives
cui Cih :;ampaigns. However, the
baAd dd give the Illini some-
usme when they led the rooters in
singing "Illinois,' as is mentioned in
,L ampus Opinion.
n; may well question, in an un-
ostentatious and mild manner, if the
official was not fully capable of count-
tg hshimself, if he really
wanted the students' help, if the
m roi rs were pr.ofundly im-
d bthis generous and vocifer-
d and if strangers were moved
K spectacular sportsmanship of
tho Yostnc-n supporters.
"M" DAY

Athletes wear their sweaters occa-
sionally irregardless of modesty and
all they are asked to do is to wear
them once a week. Surely one can be
within the realm of modesty and
still wear his sweater four times a
month . The athletes are responsible
for continuing the tradition, for they
discontinued it. And they can do so
with a spirit of helping Michigan, of
building her up into a finer institu-
tion-like they helped her when they
earned their letters.
THE HONEST VOTER
In all corners of the United States,
the constant cry of politicians has
been "get out the vote." Candidates.
apparently throw off their party dif-
ferences in appealing to the public "to
vote regardless of what candidate is
favored."
All men who have studied politics
know that of those people who are
eligible to vote only a small percent-
.age of them cast their ballot on elec-
tion day. The condition is alarming
to some people, especially to candi-
dates. They contend that democracy
cannot survive unless the people take
a greater interest in voting.
It is undoubtedly true that many
voters are ngligent about voting.
However, there are hundreds and
thousands of other people who feel
that they are expressing their honest
opinion when they intentionally stay
away from the polls.
If an individual believes that
neither Mr. Green nor Mr. Comstock
is capable of being governor of Mich-
igan, he is not honest with himself or
his fellow citizens if he casts a vote
for either one. This particular indi-
vidual is expressing his honest opinion
by staying away from the polls. Like-
wise, if the voter is convinced that
Hr. Green and Mr. Comstock are
both capable men and either one if
elected would conduct himself with
honor as governor of this state, he
feels he has not been untrue to his
trust if he fails to register a vote for
either one or the other of the candi-
date. However, in this case party el-
legiance might influence the voter to
cast a ballot, but he does not feel
that it is absolutely necessary for him
to vote to express his honest opinion.
If the voter feels that Mr. Green will
be superior to Mr. Comstock or vice
versa in the capacity of chief execu-
tive of Michigan, then he is not ex-
pressing his convictions' unless he
designates his choiceton election day,
he is -not fulfilling his duty as a
citizen.
Of course, there are those individ-
uals who take no interest in voting
whatsoever, who might excuse them-
selves from voting by saying they ex-
press their opinion by staying at
home. However, they realize that they
are not sincere and are finding ex-
cuses to shirk a duty. It is to this
type of individual that the statement
"get out the vote" is applied.
We need not be alarmed if an indi-
vidual expresses his honest opinion by
staying away from the polls, but we
should look with scorn on the individ-
ual who takes no interest whatsoever
in voting and tries to excuse himself
in an unfair manner.
THE PRESIDENT ERRS
No one will deny that President
Coolidge is not only a capable admin-
istrator of domestic affairs but an
executive possessed of shrewd poli-
tical judgment as well. But he has
made a mistake, and if to err is hu-
man, then the President is no differ-
ent than the rest of us.
In the Massachusetts senatorial

campaign the President departed from
hie usual precedent to support Sen-
ator William B. Butler. He wrote aJ
letter of commendation, called on the
voters of his home state to support
Butler, and even made a special trip
home to vote for him. But it was to
no avail. For various reasons Butler
lost.
The defeat is construed by occa-
sional critics to be a repudiation of
the federal administration ,as due to
the President's support of Butler the
election became almost a national
party issue. Anyway Butler lost, the
President erred in supporting him
and the administration suffered a po-
litical slap in the face.

Calvin Coolidge Shakes Hands
With Admiral Ixzo
i
lvin Coolidge Admiral Ixzc

Q TED /
EXTRA
HAY HIMSELF
CONTRIBUTES
Ohio State is sending its team up
here Saturday to watch Michigan
clean up on Wisconsin. Which just
shows how anxious they are down.
there to see a real football game.
We hope they aren't coming as stu-
dents, or they will go home wondering
just what was happening away out
there 'on the field. Maybe they can
sneak in as alumni, although if they
can it won't be much of a compliment
to them.
. * * *
The idea is that they want to see
how Michigan works her plays, and
they will still be wondering how on
Nov. 13.
PRESIDEWT COOLIDGE VISITS
ADMIRAL IXZO IN
WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.-President
Coolidge made a social call on Ad-
miral Ixzo, of the Michigan Horse Ma-
rines, at the latter's suite in the War
department, this morning.
After waiting forty-five minutes for
the Admiral to finish breakfast, Mr.
Coolidge was ushered into the office
of the Admiral. Other members of the
official family also attended, includ-
ing the White House spokesman.
The ceremony was brief, the group
filing rapidly past the Admiral who
stood just to the northwest of his
desk; each visitor was given a hurried
handshake, and then was hurried on
by the Horse Marines on guard. Cool-
idge was favored with a quiet smile
from the Admiral, who said, "Good
morning, Cal." Dumbfounded, Cal
spoke not a word.

IMUSIC
AND
DRAMAJ
YOUNG JOHN VAN DRUTEN
John Van Drutn, author of "Young
Woodley" which starred Glenn Hunter
last year, has accepted an invitation
to speak in Ann Arbor and will ap-
pear on Tuesday, November 9, at 4:15
o'clock in Natural Science auditorium.
Mr. Van Druten is somewhat of a
puzzle to the American stage, and for
sometime he was regarded as almost
a myth. Directly after "Young Wood-
ley" made its initial appearance in
New York, and became a success, the
theatrical world sat back to wait for
the young prodigy who had turned out
the current sensation. When no one
appeared to be lionized, it was hinted
that the play was an experient thrown
off in a mad moment by a prominent
English-author, and that John Van
Druten was a pseudonym, for the
author had submitted his play through
the royal mail to certain London play
agents.
When the play became an even
greater success-Glenn Hunter and
Helen Gahagan with the original cast
are still appearing in the east-by
dint of much cabling, correspondence
and interviews by avid Associated
Press reporters, it was discovered that'
"Mr. Van Druten" was a young man
of 24, that he was a graduate of the
University of London, that he held a
professorship of law in University ,f
Wales at Aberystwyth, that he pre-
ferred two lumps in his tea-.
But for all of that Van Druten main-
tains that he is ordinary, uninterest-
ing, and there is nothing unusual
about him. In spite of this a bashfal
young man was reluctantly dragged
from "the heart of Wales" and is now
lecturing in the United States. In-
cidently it has crystalized since that
he has completed two plays, and is
an authority on all phases of the
drama. The use of the English public
school system as a background for
"Young Woodley" required exception-
ally intelligent treatment for it is a
subject that is rather void of dramatic
possibilities-that is in the technical
sense of the term. Moreover the faut
that Glenn Hunter is remaining in
the cast of the play after being given
the opportunity to play the part of
Clyde Griffiths in the Patrick Kearney
adaptation of the Dreiser "An Ameri-
can Tragedy" is significant. For the
Dreiser play is about the biggest hit
of the present season.
THE VIRGIN MAID OF FRANCE
On Wednesday evening, November
10 in Hill auditorium Clara Clemens,
daughter of the author Mark Twain,
and in addition to all that the wife of
Ossip Gabrilowitch, will present a
dramatic version of her father's nar-
rative poem "Recollections of Joan."
Madame Clemens will play the title
role in the stage adaptation which
was revised by Donald Hamilton
Haines of the Journalism department.
There are of course dozens of ver-
sions of the Maid. At the Whitney
theater last year the boisterous cre-
ation of Shaw was given with all the
bufoonery, the ridiculous and para-
doxical humor of Shavian satire;
Shakespeare has made his La Pucelle
in "Henry VI" unladylike and more
in the character of a mistress of
Reignier and the Dauphin Charles
than an inspired shepherdess; and the
common conception is the sweet and
virginal maid who is martyred for her
country; Madame Clemen's version is
this way. It is strange that any author

so famous for his caustic wit that
could burlesque any situation and
who held little sacred in religion or
life could have approached this cre-
ation with almost reverence and awe.
The arrangement by Mr. Haines is
in ten scenes that give in vignette
fashion the history of Joan from her
childhood until she is led from her
cell to the stake, linked and synchron-
ized by an attendant chronicle. Thor-
is no attempt to portray the mfob
scenes-it is not a upeetacle, ; ut a
characterization of Joan.
* * *
"SEVENTH HEAVEN"
After a run of "Young Blood" the
Bonstelle Playhouse is now present-
ing "Seventh Heaven" which Helen
Menken achieved a record of 700
nights at the Booth theater in New
York. "Seventh Heaven" it will re-
membered was given several seasons
ago in Detroit as its premiere per-
formance.
"Seventh Heaven" is a war drama,
with all the good old hokum and blood
and thunder of Austin Strong who
also did "The Three Wise Fools". it I
portrays all the stock characters from
the slums of Paris sewer rats, street-
washers and absinthe drinkers. But
it is an astonishingly successful
-- - r - n ii olm r i + r

SKILLED REPAIRING
We will give you a good trade allowance for your old pen, any
standard make, in exchange for
Rider 6 trp
This pen has four very positive advantages over any other 'Make.
1) Better flow, (2) six to twelve times more ink capacity, (3) only five
parts, strong parts, therefore it will outlast any other pen. (4) It is made
right here in Ann Arbor and serviced by the manufacturers.
Rider's Pen Shop
24 HOUR SERVICE

FMASKo.R

llh

Style - Quality - Service
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work. Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burned Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415

Gilbert and Band. Box
Chocolates

-s tlIfllll11llillllililill1 ll I iN lillil illlllll ~lllll llillllltlllllllllilllllilllllllillllil I ilH Hlltli l gtM Mlp li~t1t l;
GR9IHA 715
BOOKS
Travel - Poetry - Pliays - Fiction - Biographies
A Very Complete Stock of the Latest and Best Books.
GK§4HAfIS-
At Both Ends of The Dia Bona.
dHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI ill11lII IH iIIIl~lll llII ll llllIIIllIlIIIIIIIIII111IIIill llllllll ill IIIllltlll l

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

Delicious pieces of the best in confec-
tionery packed in handsome gift boxes.

I

4

1

',

I

j

Swift's Drug Co.'
340 South State

Cal

in

Michigan once had an "M" day,
when all possessors of Varsity letters
and numerals wore their sweaters. It
was a campus tradition that had been
observed on Wednesday of every week
for years. But within the last few
years this custom has gradually fallen
away until it is now a thing of the
past.
The loss of such a colorful tradition
has been bemoaned by graduates, who
feel the materializing tendency of an
institution of Michigan's size. It is
true in small schools, where the stu-
dent body is compact and homogene-
ous, where everyone knows everyone
else ,that numerous traditions flourish
and are as sacred to the students as
their .religion. In fact, they are their
religion. The bigger the school, the
fewer the traditions. If for no other
reason than to create the atmosphere
of the small school, Michigan athletes
should again take up the custom, for
students as well as alumni know the
deficiency of our campus when it
comes to displaying traditions.
But such a reason would not be
sufficient to warrant the re-establish-,
mett of "M" day. The athletes them-
.gclvos must feel the impressiveness
and value of such a significant tradi-
tion. The University honors and re-

* * *
BALTIMORE 8 P M NOV 3
NAVY GAME IS OVER STOP AND A
COUPLE OF EXCLAMATION POINTS
VISITED ANNAPOLIS THIS MORN-
ING STOP THE USUAL BIG CHEER
STOP NAVY. GOAT SAW ME FIRST
STOP STOP STOP I DONT KNOW
WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE BUT I FEEL
I HAVE MET IT.
IXZO.
* * *
FUND INCREASING RAPIDLY
ROLLS' confidence in the patriotism
of the student body is justly rewarded
by the flood of contributions pouring
into this office like townspeople at a
convocation.
* * *
The boys around the office are get-
ting jealous, and make nasty cracks
like "Well, It's too bad you won't be
completing your college education,"
and "Write me from Canada, won't
you, Tim 7"
ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
Today's contributions
Cad Aver............$ .15
Deacon ................. . 09
Joseph Krashney......... .45
Joseph Ziltch........... .15
Marjorie ................ .01
Timothy Hay ..Time and energy
Today's total......... .31
GRAND TOTAL...........47
YET TO BE RAISED .... 499.53
* *6*
AGAINST CO-EDUCATION
Dear Mr. Hay,
Never let it be said that a co-ed led
any kind of a list, especially the one
of ROLLS' Stadium Bond contrib-
utors. Herein I enclose fifteen cents,
which equals the "Special Co-Ed's"
mite, and I raise her five.
Dissectingly yours,
Cad Aver.
P.S. By the way, Mr. Hay, when are
you going'to contribute?
* *
But, don't we contribute our val-
uable time and energy to this cam-
paign? In fact we think we ought
to get a salary for promotion of the
thing. We will take it up with the
Athletic association.
* * *
If you tell us your name, we can
teill vnatinofwhimih nao o rnl f,' ist.,,naa-

4

Y'

A

FFA

The mos t we lcome call .)

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

POOR SPORTSMANSHIP
To The Editor
On Saturday last I attended the
Michigan-Illinois football game. Neith-
er before the game nor at any other
time did I hear the Michigan rooters
cheer Illinois. I did hear, however,

i

NEVER was there a smoke invita-
tion that could compare with
"Have a Camel!"
On swirling city streets. In the
roadster as it bounds over the hills.
fn the study or by the fireside, no
other smoking phrase is so pro-
vocative of enjoyment and friend-
ship. 1In its realization comes a

ever-increasing millions who have
tried them all, who could well
afford to pay more, Camels are the
first and only choice. Since the
dawn of smoking, there has never
been a success like Camel's.
Camel preference is the inevi-
table expression of Camel quality.
No other cigarette made is like

I

to smoke ever sounded

''

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan