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November 03, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-03

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PAOE FOUR

"THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

WIEDNFJSDA'YNOVMER 3 1 26

MOAN

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board i
Control of Student Publications.
Memblerkf Wetern Conference Editorial
Association;
the Associated P"s is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lisbed therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post
master eneral.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices:eAnn Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor..................W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor.'... ...lrwin A. 'Olian
NewsEdiors...Frederick Shilit''
News Editors.............Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor .......Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Sim son
Telegraph Editor...........'Morris Zwerd iim
Music and Drama......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
James Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Douglas Doubleday Carl Burger
Reporters.
Marion Anderson G. Thomas McKean
Alex Bochnowski Adeline O'Bren
Jan besikpbell Kenneth Patrick
Martin J. Con Morris Quinn"
Windsor Davies Sylvia Stone
Clarence Edelson . James Sheehan
William Emery Heny Thurnau
John Friend William Thurnau
Robert G essner Milford Vanik
Elaine eGrubr Herbert Vedder
Morton B. eov Marian Welles
Paul Kern Thaddeus Wasielevski
Milton Kirshbauo Sherwood Winslow
Ervin Laowe Thomas Winter '
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED, JR.
n.................Paul W. Arnold
..............William C. Pusch
.d,,tsn........ .. ..... Thomas Sunderland
iin ...........George H. Annable, Jr.
("i s i....................T. Kenneth Haven
S............ .John H. Bobrink
: u...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
;. i. ho. Jr T. T. Greil, Jr.
l; A. iSrw A. Mi. Hinkley
TM. 11. Cain E. L. Hulse
larvey Carl S. Kerbaury
Dorothy Carpenter R. A. Meyer
Manion Daniels H. W. Rosenblum
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1926
Night Editor-JO H. CHAMBERLIN
ANOTHER ONE!
Great gratification has been mani-
fested over the entire campus with the
announcement that Michigan is to
have a new honor society. Not only
is the University greatly in need of
another such organization, but the
establishment of the chapter here also
stamps Michigan as a school of
sparkling originality-a pioneer in the
field of education. It will be one of
the first two thousand honor so-
cieties in the country.
To be perfectly serious, however,
there are undoubtedly immense in-
contives to study accruing from the
passion to belong to an honor so-
1eiet'. Am,,rican students seem so
constituted that it is impossi-
ble for them to study unless they See
dangling at the end of their college
careers a tiny gold key or some little
charm. As far as this phase is con-
cerned, few can deny that there is a
place for societies such as Phi Beta
Kappa in the educational world.
The only objection that can possi-
bly be adduced to the new group is
i t "i; dding to our present over-
organization. Literary students al-
' ro;ay h.v e me incentive, at the ends

?3 ther .' rs, and it seems almost
absurd to consider a man any better
because he received good marks his
first year in college. For those who
plan to enter the teaching profession
x it may be an advantage to have a half
dozen or so additional keys hanging
from their watch chains; but the pro-
essional man can dismiss them with
a smug smile, for he knows that if
, d aken constitutional history
or organic chemistry they might not
have the key either. The grade is not
what one knows; it is the estimate of
another as to what one knows in one
particular course. The honor society
S mi~'mt base its membership on grades.
We already have on the campus so-
cieties for almost every conceivable
type of student. The electrical en-
gineer, the debater, the woman arch-
itect, the engineer, the chemical en-
gineer, the medico student, the law
student, and the senior literary stu-
dent, have honor societies, and now we
arn about to add the freshman literary
student. That is the case for over-
orgramzation. On the other side we
have added incentive to study. In so
far as one overbalances the other, just
that far we have an excuse for 'or
against the new society.
?gCIINA -

Ion customs tariff and extra-territorial'
jurisdiction, shows the conflicting
views and inadequate knowledge on
the subject.
In his summary, the Chinese stu-
dent declares that the present social,
political, and economic difficulties of
SChinaare due to "the imperialism of
the West combined with the forces'of
conservatism and militarism in
China." As if in direct refutation to
the charges against the world powers,
Mr. Strawn characterized the belief
that China's present precarious status
is due to imperialism or lack of tariff
autonomy, to extra-territoriality or to
unequal treaties as "pure bunk."
As portrayed by the returned dele-
gate, this Oriental country is now
suffering from a devastating struggle
between the various war lords, who
are fighting for control of the national
government and its treasury. As the
existing factions are constantly chang-
ing and new groups are forming,
there seems to be little hope for a
complete settlement, which will allow
"the frugal, industrious, and patient
Chinese to enjoy the fruits of their
labor."
Although China presents one of the
world's most serious problems, other
nations are legally restrained from
interfering with a country engaged in
civil war. Practically they are pre-
vented from further settling or even
discussing the tariff or extra-terri-
toriality questions because of the
revolutionary activities of the war
lords.
With changing conditions preclud-
ing the formation of a definite atti-
tude, the United States has wisely
taken up the policy of "watchful
waiting." Adoption of this policy in
a helpful, sympathetic spirit Is the
most that the remainder of the world
can now do.
THE STRAIGHT TICKET
Torchlight processions and bitter
political rivalry are largely things of
the past. The days when one was
either born a Democrat or Republi-
can and couldn't change one's party
any more than one could change
one's religion or the color of one's
hair are past. With these narrow
minded practices has also practically
vanished another unworthy phase of
our political life-the straight ticket.
It is perfectly absurd to imagine, of
course, that any one party or group
can secure candidates for twenty or
thirty offices that are uniformly better
than every one of the men they oppose
in the other party for the same offices.
The law of averages would cause us
to expect that the division is about
equal, and that the divided ticket is
not only a safeguard but a necessity
to fair minded voters. In view of this
fact, then, it is quite startling to pick
up a campaign letter of one of the
major parties-sent to thousands of
voters-which urges all people to
vote the straight ticket of that party,
in that that organization may have
complete control of all the machinery
of government in the state. It is not
only startling; it is revolting; for the
straight ticket is an obsolete relic of
the consummate narrow mindedness
of our ancestors.
In the days before people thought
a'bout their government a straight
ticket was probably as good as any-
thing that could be voted. There
never was a time, however, when the
nation was more in need of intelligent
choice and less in need of straight
tickets than it is at present; and
surely, if this is an era of enlight-

enment, the voters must choose, not
tolerate and suffer.
FIGURES DECEIVE
If the statistics in the national sur-
.vey of conditions under prohibition
made by The Moderation League, Inc.,
with headquarters in New York city,
are to be accepted as true, the number
of arrests in Ann Arbor for intoxica-
tion has been growing larger every
year since national prohibition be-
came effective. The figures in the
survey have been obtained from police
departments, the researchers claim.
The number of arrests for drunken-
ness here in 1925 is listed as 138,
which is an increase of 15 over 1924
when the number arrested for intoxi-
cation was 123. The figure quoted for
1923 is 95, for 1922 it is 71, for- 1921
it is 57, for 1920 it is 47, and for 1919
it is 40.
It is unfortunate that this condition
should exist because undoubtedly
many unthinking individuals will
place the blame on the students in the
University. They will not take the
pains to investigate the true condi.
tions before expressing their opinion,
because they are constantly looking
for just such statistics as these.
If those persons who are quick to
express their opinions on these figures
investigate they will undoubtedly

T AVED ROLL
LHALLENGED
TO RACE
The Student Directory is out today,
and anyone who hasn't by this time
found out where everyone he wants
to locate lives will buy one.
* * C
The election in Michigan is over,
and the Republican club will soon
know whether it was worth while to
help Democrats do their "absentee
voting.".
President Little is back home, and
while he didn't exactly bring back a
dormitory in his suitcase, he did hint
that Santa Claus may bring us one if
we don't hang up the stocking for a
year or so.
ADMIRAL IXZO CHALLENGED
Dear Mr. Hay
I have tread with a great deal of in-
terest the trip of Admiral Ixzo to the
East. It has been my opinion that he
was mentally deficient and I was sure
of it when I heard that' he stopped at
Vassar. Now here is the point. I am
an engineer but not mentally deficient
and what I have forgotten abo'ut
horses is more than Ixzo ever knew.
I am confident, moreover, that I can
secure better mileage and higher effi-
ciency from a stock model horse than
he. What I propose is that you send
us both to the Ohio State or Minnesota
game and start us at the same time
from Ann Arbor. If I don't beat the
Admiral to our destination I shall be
willing to join the Horse Marines. As
you know, us engineering students are
fast men and we don't stop at girls'
schools. I have had forty hours of
horse tactics and feel that I am quali-
fied in every way to make the trial.
Hoping to hear from you soon, I re-
main:
Kernel.
* * *
We are willing to hold the race, and
unless the Admiral feels it beneath
him to take part in such a public ex-
hibition, you can have the affair, but,
let it be understood that the contest-
ants buy their own hay and oats-for
the horses, that is-in order that no
possible taint of professionalism enter
this contest.
We don't want the papers of the
country editorializing about profes-
sionalism in collegiate horse and
buggy racing.
IXZO GOING TO NAVY GAME
PAUL SMITHS N Y 9 42 P M NOV 2
WHEN I ENTERED THE MAMMOTH
DINING HALL HERE LAST NIGHT
RESORTERS LET OUT CHEER
WHICH DID NOT SUBSIDE AT ALL
STOP EVEN COOLIDGE WOULD
HAVE JOINED IN IF HE HAD BEEN
HERE NOW
IXZO
PHILADELPHIA 11 51 P M NOV 2
RECEPTION COMMITTEE KEPT ME
SO BUSY SPEAKING AT DEDICA-
TIONS AND BANQUETS THAT I
DIDN'T GET A CHANCE (TO SEE
SESQUI STOP AM TO SEE COOL-
IDGE TOMORROW
IXZO

C C s
ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
Today's contributions
LEGAL HOLIDAY; BANK
CLOSED
GRAND TOTAL.......$ .16
YET TO BE RAISED.. 499.84
4* *
, BOGIES
Editor's note-This communication
was held for verification by Sir Arthurj
Conan Doyle.-
Philly, Oct. 29.-Joseph Zilch, de-
ceased professor emeritus of barbery
college of tonsorial arts, U. of M., in
a spectacular speech at the' Alumni
banquet here tonight, praised football
for its educational opportunities.
"The pulling of Oosterbaan's hair
by Shapley will provide an excellent
demonstration of the art of barbery,"
he explained.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, when con-
sulted In regard to the alleged ap-
pearance of the deceased Joe Zilch atf
the banquet, said, "Yes, I was there,k
in spirit, and photographed him. The
picture will appear in the Chelsea Op-

MUSIC
,"D
DRAMA
THIS AF'ERNOON; The Organj
Recital in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock.
THE ENGLISH SINGERS ,
The English Singers of London,
consisting of six artists -Flora Mann,
Nellie Carson, Lilian Berger, Cuth-
bert Kelly, Norman Stone and Nor-
man Notley, will give the second con-
cert in the Choral Union series in Hill
auditorium on Friday evening, Novem-
ber 5 at 8 o'clock.
These singers are regarded by many
critics (Lawrence Gilman in the New
York Herald Tribune and Olin Downes
in the New York Times) as the out-
standing musical novelty of last year;
and their appearance in seventy of
the metropolitan musical centers of
the United States and Canada this
season is being regarded as equally!
successful. They are bringing to the
concert hall a distinctly novel reper-

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DANCING TONIGHT
and
EVERY WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY, OR
SATURDAY
Hot Music by Jack Scott's
"WOLVERINES"
Convenient lobby, rest rooms, check
rooms, and fountain service..
GRANGER'S ACADEMY

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toire; .they have reiscovered the
possibilities in Elizabethan music, and
their concerts of madrigals, folks
songs, ballets and canzonets are dis-
tinctly' different than the numbers
usually given in work of this type.
Just as Yvette Guilbert saved the
medieval French folk songs from
oblivion, the English singers have
brought to light many of the English
drinking songs that were forgotten
and have developed and popularized
others. These "Songs to Queen, Eliza-
beth"-history students needn't snig-
ger, they are nice songs-are excep-
tionally interesting for the prophetic
modernity of the music. "For all these
Englishmen (Byrd, Weelkes, Wilbye
and the rest) were masters of rhythm
as they were of harmonic melodic ex-
pression a polyphonic art which need
not have hung its head in'the presence
of the divine Sebastian himself a cen-
tury later."-Lawrence Gilman.
Their most valuable service to a
musical public other than this is the
fact that they have proved that Eng-
hish is singable. For years it has
been a major premise in all musical
circles that the rich liquid vowels of
the French, Italian, and German were
far more suited to vocal rendition.
English has presented difficulties to
the foreign singers that made it advis-
able to develop all grand opera and
many of the modern operas in those
languages. But, singing with the
clearest diction possible with intelli-
gent interpretation the English Sing-
ers give their entire program in
English.
Their numbers are as follows:
I
"Motet
Praise our Lord .......William Byrd
Ave Verum............. Wiliam Byrd
Hosanna to the Son of David.......
.Thomas Weelkes
II i
Madrigals And A Ballet
O softly singing lute...........
.Francis Pilkington
Tho' Amaryllis dance ..William Byrd
On the Plains......Thomas Weelkes
Stay, Corydon ..........John Wilbye
lit
Folk Songs
The Dark-eyed Sailor...........
Arranged by R. Vaughan Williams
The Turtle Dove
Wassail Song
Intermission
IV
Italian Street Cries
Chimney Sweeps .... Jacques du Pont
Rag and Bone ....Adriano Banchieri
Hot Chestnuts ......Jacques du Pont
V
Duets And Trio
I spy Celia..........Henry Purcell
John, come kiss me now (16th Cen-
tury)
The Three Fairies ....Henry Purcell
VI

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Your
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Professors
Administrators
Alumni
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most of your college years,
it is necessary to know not
only what is happening in
your college but the outstand-
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