100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 31, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

ld& a IddL-. A p 4F

attij

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 30 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1926 . EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTc'

CAMPBELL MEMORIAL
LECTURE TO BE GIVEN
BY GERMAN CHEMI
DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL SCHOO
SPEAKS ON RESISTANCE
OF STEEL TOMORROW
WILL GIVE TWO TALKS
Lecture Dedicated By Steel Group To
Late Michigan Professor In
Honor Of ltis Work
As a memorial to the late Prof. E
D. Campbell, head &f the chemistry de-
partment who died last year, Dr.
William Minot Guertler, director of
the Metall-Institut der Technischen
Hochschule%, of Charlottenburg, Ger-
many, will delived the E. D). Campbell
Memorial Lecture of the American So-
ciety for Steel treating, as a Univer-
sity lectuire, tomorrow at 8 o'clock in
the amphitheater of the chemistry
building. He will speak on "The Cor-
rosion Resistance of Steels."
Professor Campbell was a member
of the Society for Steel treating, and
one of the most prominent men of the
United States in his field. When he
died, the Society dedicated to him a
lecture of Dr. Guertler's, who was pro-
cured to go on a speaking tour under
the auspices of the A. S. S. T., and
proclaimed that it ,should be known
as the E. D. Campbell Memorial lec-
ture in the honor of one of its most
noted members. This lecture was
first delivered at the annual meeting
of the Society which was held in Chi-
cago the week of Sept. 20.
Has Seven Lectures
Dr. Guertler has seven lectures on
hand, any number of which he can
deliver at any stop on his speaking
tour. During his stay in Ann Arbor,
he will give the Memorial Lecture
and "Systematic Procedure in Estab-
lishing the Limits of the Utilization
of New Metal Combinations in Tech-
nical Practice." This latter speech
will be delivered Tuesday.
Dr. Guertler has made an extensive
study on the subject of corrosive
steels. He believes that chromium
gives the greatest protection to iron,
even though it, itself, is less noble
than iron, and nickel, which is more
noble. However, this protection af-
forded by chromium can be produced
only by secondary effects. Dr. Guert-
ler declared that by numerous tests
with combined chemical and mechan-
ical attack, it is possible to determine
the extent to which the observed re-
pistance is due to the automatic for-
mation of a protective coating.
OHIO STATE WINS
FROM STAGG TEAM
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 30.-Ohio State
took its expected step towards the
Western Conference championship by
defeating Chicago on Stagg field to-
day, 18 to 0. Despite the one-sided
score, the game was closely fought
until the last stages when the Ma-
roon defense crumpled.
Ohio's line showed its superiority
with Hess, all-American guard, and
the Ohio tackles dashing through con-
sistently to break up Chicago's plays
before they were fairly started. Until
Marek took his broken hand into the
fray late in the final quarter, the
backfields were evenly matched, the
visitors having a seeming advantage
only because their linesmen kept the
Chicago forwards away from initial
nterference. The contest attracted
a recordythrong of 45,000.
A 20 yard pass, Karow to Aler, led
to Ohio's first score. The receiver
sprinted to the Maroon 15 yard line
and another pass and two drives at
the line took the ball to within six
inches of the goal. On the fourth
down, Karow carried it over. Ohio's

second counter cane easily. Eby,
who has taken Grim's place at right
halfback, ran a punt back to Chicago's
43 yard line. A few minutes later
Karow cut through left tackle and
ran 30 yards for the touchdown. Eby
scored the third tally in the final
quarter by line plunges after Clark
intercepted one of Chicago's passes.

Completes Research
jWork In U. S. Island

GILKEY TO SPEAK AT
UNIVERSITY'S FOURTH
STUDINT CONVOCATION
COMES AT PERSONAL INVITATION
OF PRESIDENT LITTLE; SPOKE
AT STUDENT CONFERENCE
GRAHAM TOBE SOLOIST
Chicagoan Has Served A's Preacher In
Every Leading University Of
The United States
Dr. Charles W. Gilkey of Chicago
will give the address at the fourth
student convocation of the fall series
at 11 o'clock this morning in Hill aud-
itorium. "What Is There In Religion"
is the subject which he has chosen.
Dr. Gilkey speaks today at the per-
sonal invitation of President Clarence
Cook Little who heard him at the
Lake Geneva student conference last
June. He is well known to many!
Michigan students through the Lake
Geneva meetings and visits to Ann
Arbor for various University serv-
ices. Dr. Gilkey gave up engagements
at Smith and Mount Hlolyoke colleges
to speak here today.
Having served as university preach-
er in every leading college and uni-
versity in the country, Dr. Gilkey has
gained a keen insight into American

Grid-Graph Of Navy
Battle Calls Many
To Hill Auditorium
Fillin~g the main floor almost to ca-
pacity and part of the balcony, a
crowd of more than 2,000 watched the
story of the Michigan-Navy football
gae as told by the grid-graph yes-
terday afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Records played on a Brunswick
panatrope through the courtesy of
Stoffler's Music store, furnished a
substitute for the Reserve band.
Itenneth C. Midgley, '28L, played
several numbers on the xylophone
before the game and between halves.
John M. Bennett, '27L, one of the
managers of the performance, gave a
short talk before the game in which
he explained the workings of the
lights and signals to the audience.
The announcements were made by
Royal S. Cherry, '26.
SHUTER PICKS LARGE
CHORUSES F OR OPERA'
Record Number Of Try-outs Consid.
erecl; Three Distinet Choruses
Will Perform
REHEARSALS HELD DAILY

Outkicks Hamilton
Durirg First Half

MIDSHIPMEN SCORE 10 POINTS IN LAST

3

HALF OF GAME TO* AVENGE 54-0 DEFAT
BY WOLVERINES AT FERRY F1ILD IN 11325
SAILORS GAIN 165 YARDS FROM SCRIMMAGE IN
FINAL PERIODS OF BRILLIANT STRUGGLE
By WILTON A. SIMPSON
(Special'to, the Daily)
MUNICIPAL STADIUM, BALTIMORV,, Oct. 30.-The Mid-
shipmen from the United States Naval Academy got full revenge for
the 54 to o defeat administered to them last year by Michigan by down-
ing Coach Yost's Wolverines io-o before an enthusiastic: crowd of
8o,ooo here this afternoon.
The Navy team was the Navy team of last year, in name only. The
Navy goat was expected to butt today, but not so stingingly. Coach
Ingram, formerly of the University of Indiana, has made a complete
revolution in Nav'y's football history. The Midshipmen displayed a
perfect pass defense, making Michigan's highly touted aerial attack an
unloaded weapon.
The Navy backs ripped through the Wolverine line time and time

MICHIGAN DOWNED BY
NA VY'S VARIEDA TTA CK

Joseph R. Hayden
Professor of Political Science, who
returnedl last night fromn the Philip-
pines, after spending five months as
a member of the Carmi Thompson
Presidential investigating committee.
HAYDEN RETURNS FRHOM
TOUR OFPHILIPPINES
Discloses Unusual Natural Resources
Of Islands Discovered During
Five Months' Visit
FINDS NATIVES FRIENDLY
On his return last night from a five
months' tour of the Philippines, made
in order to complete his study of
Philippine institutions started two
years ago, and as a member of the
Carmi Thompson mission, Prof.
Joseph R. Hayden of the Political
Science department praised the co-op-
erative spirit shown by the natives
in the efforts of the mission, and em-
phasized the value of the natural re-
sources of the islands.
"The Island of Mindanao," he stat-
ed, "is the richest undeveloped terri-
tory in the world. There are limit-{
less iron resources, coal fields, oil,
and a fine soil." Coffee, rubber, rice,
and other tropical products could be
grown there effectively, he said. The
island is mostly 2,000 to 3,000 feet
above sea level, according to Profes-
sor Hayden, and the climate is there-
I fore favorable.
The trip was made partially under
I the auspices of the graduate school
to carry on the study begun when
Proftesor Hayden was exchange pro-
fessor in the Philippines in 1923. For
most of the 12,040 miles which he cov-
ered in the islands, he was wItb the
Thompson mission, on which hie rep-
mresentedthe Christian SciencehMoni-
tor. The party was led by Mr.
'ihomp>son a former candidate for
governor in Ohio, and the holder of
large coal, timber, and copper inter-
ests. He was once assistant secretary
!of the interior, and was secretary to
President Taft.
Represented t'colidge
Mr. Thompsontwas sent as a per-
sonal representative of President
Coolidge to study conditions, and to
Smake suggestions which might lead
to the economic development or im-
prevenient of the administration of
the islands. He visited 42 of the 48
Philippine provinces, receiving offi-
cial reports from each department of
the government, and many special re-
ports and letters from authoritative
pee-'le. Ie was accompanied by the
Am (riean trade commissioner of Ma-
nia, and by correspondents of several
American newspapers.
Professor Hayden commended the
effort made by Mr. Thompson, saying
that the latter worked diligently, and
!"is going to present a report based
entirely on the facts as he saw then."

student life. He received his A. B. Selection of an unusually large per-
and A. M. degrees at Harvard in 1904 sonnel for the men's and women's
and 1906. During the next two years choruses of the 21st annual Union
he served as student secretary on the opera, was announced yesterday by
International Y. M. C. A. committee. E. Mortimer Shuter, opera director.
In 1908, Dr. Gilkey earned his B. D. The 42 picked men will largely de-
degree at the Union Theological semi- termine, through their dancing, sing-
nary after which he attended the Uni- ing, and costume effects, the almost
versity of' Berlin, the University of assured success of "Front Page Stuff."
Marburg, the United Free Church col- This year's choruses were chosen fromi
lege at Glasgow, and Oxford. In 1910 the largest field of tryouts in the his-
he was ordained a Baptist minister, tory of the Opera, more than 900 men
and became pastor of Hyde Park having received consideration since
church, at Chicago, the same year, the first call last spring.
where he has been since. During the 4A new feature of chorus work in
last few years he has had an arrange- this year's production will be its di-
ment with his church to address col- vision into three separate and dis-
lege and university audiences in tiuct choruses, a men's chorus of 12,
various parts of the country from time a women's show chorus of6, and a
to time. le is a trustee of the Uni- mixed chorus, men and women of 24,
versity of Chicago, and the Grenfell appearing in specialty dances.
association of that city, and a member a se of tsecfatytane r
of the University club and the Iar- Because of the fact that the chor-,
yard club at Chicago. uses are the backbone of the produc-
Theodore Hornberger, former chair- tion, every selection was made by Mr.
TheodoreHt oreh i Shuter with the greatest care. The
man of the, convocations, will presideunsalwiepadtetexbtd
at the services this morning. Robert unusually widespread talent exhibited
Graham will be the soloist and Dalies by nearly all of the men chosen has
Frantz will be at the organ. The furnished an opportunity for an effec-
program follows: tive variety of choruses and dance
Organ Prelude-Prelude to "The {numbers. Mr. Shuter believes also.
Delude" -Saint-Saens that the personnel of the three
u ..... .schoruses is truly representative of the
Hymn-"Faith of Our Fathers" student body this year.
FSt. Catherine The choruses worked for several
Congrega.'''''t' i 'eweeks of preliminary training last
Prayer-Dr. Charles V. Gilkey. j spring under the personal direction Of
Offertory Solo-"The Voice in the I Roy Hoyer, dancing partner of Fred
Wilderness" ..John Pindle Scott Stone, and at that time were instruc-
Mr. Graham. ted in the rudiments of chorus dane-
Address-"What Is There in Religion" ing. Since then, they have been given
Dr. Gilkey. dance numbers from time to time.
Organ Postludr.Grnd Choeur Rehearsals are now held every day,
Ogn F ".s.t..d..... a. d C Salom e and occasionally tw ice daily.
inF"..............The three choruses are as follows:
Mr. Frantz. I Men's chorus: George Krege, '28; Wal-
ter Auer, '27; Carlos Schott, '29; Ce-
a , 4dric Traeger, '28, Seely Chapman, '28;
Navy Flyer Reporte ;&;e "sCRc,'8
, I~Howard Bloom, '28; Wesley Rice, '28; i
Dead In Plane Cra FayeFevre, '27; Harley Haynes, '29;
Dea n a e r S 1Stanley Podbielniali, '29E; Thomas }
___Winter, '28; Forrest Heath, '27.
(By Associated Press) Women's chorus: William Comstock,
MATHEWS, Va., Oct. 0.-Lieut. 'BE; Richard Kurvink, 129; Vincent
Frank H. Conant, Jr., Navy SchneiderIWall, '28; David Harbaugh, '28;
cup race flyer, is believed to have been Thomas Dougall, '28; Robert Man-
killed when his plane crashed and chester, '27L.
sank in shallow water near here to- Men's and women s mixed chorus:
day ,Men: Farnum Buckingham, '28 ; Al-
fred Krell, '29; Earl Kuhn, '27E; Karl
The plane crashed suddenly while Mast, '27; Theodore Skinner, '28;
flying over Winter Harbor, 30 miles 'Kenneth Stolpman, '29; William Thur-
north of Norfolk. Efforts to raise the nau, '29; Harlan Cristy, '29; Robert
craft have been futile and no trace Price, '27; Florian Blaszczyk, '29 ;I
of the pilot has been found. The num- Robert Spicer, 29. Women: William
her of the plane was A-6970, which
officers at the naval air station said Chester Johnson, '27; John Ottaway,
was that of Conant. He was unac- '28; Edvard Heyman, '28; Roland
companied. ?FGies, '29E; Philip, Crane, '29; George
Conant was a member of the Navy McKnight, '28; Lester Curl, '28; Law-
Schneider cup team and was practic- rence Pettibone, '28; Rudolph Clary,
ing for the speed races to be held '28; Charles Spaulding, '27.
over Hampton Roads Nov. 11. The
plane crashed at 2 o'clock.
GOPHERS WININ
BROWN CONQUERS FINAL MINUTES?

E
,
;
;
.
i
I

Louis Gilbert
Stellar halfback, who played the
} major role in the Wolverine attack in
yesterday's game. Gilbert, in addi-
tion to gaining more ground than any
of his team-mates on end runs and
in running back punts, decisively out-
punted Hamilton, Navy star, through-
out the initial half of the struggle.
BROWN WILL LECTURE
ON LA'USANNE TREATY
Speaker Has Held Diplomatic Posts;
Writings Include Books
And Articles
SPEECH OPENS SERIES
Consideration of the "Lausanne
Treaty and Our Relations With the
Near East" will be taken up in the
} lecture by Prof. Philip Marshall
Brown, writer and professor of inter-
national law at Princeton, at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow in Natural Science
auditorium. The address is being
given in connection with the School
1 of Religion seminar on "The Moral
Issues of Modern Life," which deals
with the two questions, the moral is-1
I sues of disarmament in international
relations, and the regional problems
[ in international relations. This is the
first of the series of lectures which
will be given by prominent men along
these lines.
, Professor Brown has spent several
years in various capacities with for-
eign diplomatic posts. He was pri-
vate secretary to Lloyd C. Griscom in
1900-1901, later serving as secretary to
the American Legation,- Constanti-
I nople, the legation to Guatemala and
Honduras, the American Embassy at!
Constantinople, and was envoy ex-1
traordinary and Minister Plenipotent-
iary to Honduras. Since that time
he has been at Princeton in the capa-
city of professor of international law.
HAVANA-A committee of sugar
growers has recommended to Presi-
dent Machado that the coming sugar
crop be limited to about 4,500,000 tons.
The planters also suggested that a
world sugar conference be called to
prevent over-production.

I .
THE LINEUP .
MICHIGAN NAVY r
Oosterbaan ..L.E....... Lloyd
Baer........L.T.. Wickhorst
Palmeroli ....L.G ......Cross
Truskowski ...C......Hoerner
Lovette......R.G.......Born
Gabel.......R.T.......Eddy
Flora.E............ Hardwick
Friedman ....Q.B... Hannegan
Gilbert......L.H.... Hamilton r
Greenwald .. .R.H..... Goudges
Molenda......F.B..... Caldwell ,
Substitutions: Olsen for Wick-~
horst; Weber for Molenda;
Puckelwartz for Friedman.
I Touchdown-Hannegan; point
after touchdown - Hamilton; j
fielfl goal-Hamilton. j
Officials: Referee - Davet
Fultz (Brown); umpire-John
Schomer (Chicago)*;, ead lines-
man-Hugo Von Kers'burg (Har-F
vard); field judge-J. H. Nichols1
(Oberlin). Time of neriods-15 Y
minutes.
Peters Kicks Goal
For Illini Victoryt
Over Pennsylvania
(By Associated Press)
CHAMPAIGN, Oct. 30.-Pennsyl-
vania, conqueror of five eastern foes,
came West, saw, and was conquered
by Illinois today in a game dramati-
cally won in the last three minutes.
of play, producing a climax that
brought hysteria to the crowd of 65,-1
000 spectators. The score was 3 o 0.
"Frosty" Peters, the mercury from
the Montana plains, won the game for'
Illinois by booting a field goal from
the 15 yard line.
For three periods and half of the
fourth there was nothing to choose
between the two elevens. The lines
stood shoulder to shoulder, playing an
astonishing defensive battle. Illinois
stood off the threats of the phantom
light Pennsylvania backfield, smash-
ing their hidden ball formation.
When the opportunity came for
Peters, filling "Red" Grange's shoes
on this year's eleven, to display his
kicking ability, he left no doubt con-
cerning his particular specialtiy. He
also left no doubt in his ability to
throw forward passes, for it was his
accurate toss to Lanunm, the Illinois
quarterback, that put the ball on
Pennsylvania's 21 yard line in the
closing minutes of play, th s enabling
him to score.
After this pass, Galli'an broke
through left tackle for six yards and
Peters added another, going to Penn-
sylvania's 14 yard line. Peters then
ripped through left tackle for five
yards, giving him first down on Penn-
sylvania's 9 yard line. They stopped
Gallivan without gaining on the next
smash, but Lanum picked up three
yards through center.
Then Peters dropped back, and
while a death like silence fell over
the huge stadium, he stood there on
the 15 yard line waiting for a pass
from center. The ball was snapped
perfectly. His toe crashed against
it and the ball sailed high above the
goal posts, giving Illinois its victory.
OTHER FOOTBALL SCORES
I ev ,,, _ _ 7 TT_. T

again and used a short forward pass
as its chief ground gainer. Fried-
man's passes were hurried and were
wild for the most part. Oosterbaan,
the all-American receiver of Fried-
man's passes, was covered and failed
to gain much ground. However, he
was a tower of strength in defense.
Navy Backs Show Dash
The Navy backs came onto the field
in the second period with renewed
energy and tore Michigan's line to
pieces.
During the second half, the Midship-
men gained 165 yards from the line of
scrimmage, Caldwell being the prin-
cipal ground gainer for the Annapolis
team. Gilbert was the chief ground
gainer for Michigan, making yardage
on returning punts and on end runs.
During the first half Michigan gain-
ed on exchanges of punts, but in the
final period Hamilton, star back of
th Ingram team, outkicked Gilbert.
Wolverines Excel In First Half
Michigan had the bal far into the.
Midshipmen's territory for the greater
part of the first half, but lacked the
necessary punch to score. A forward
pass, Friedman to Oosterbaan,
brought the ball within one yard of
the Navy goal line in tlfe second quar-
ter, but the Wolverines lost the ball
on downs.
Hamilton made the first score of
the game in the third quarter when
he stood on Michigan's 25 yard line
and kicked the ball squarely between
the uprights giving the Navy a three
point lead.
In the fourth quarter after bringing
the ball,.far into Michigan's territory
on a series of line plunges, Hamilton
threw a forward pass to Goudge, who
raced to within two yards of the goal
line before he was tackled. Hamilton
failed to gain on a line plunge, Cald-
well squirmed through center for a
touchdown,hmaking the first touch-
down that has been, made against.
Michigan in two years. Hamilton
made a successful attempt to kick
goal after the touchdown, making the
score 10 to 0 in the Midshipmen's
favor.
Wolverines Fight Hard
The Wolverines made a desperate
attempt to score in the closing min-
utes by throwing long passes, but
for the most part the Navy blacked
them.
f The Midshipmen ran wild over the
playing field after the Navy eleven
had defeated Michigan 10-0 here this
afternoon. The cadets pulled up the
goal posts at each end of the field,
and carried them ove'r to the Michi-
gan stands, where the Middles in a
great mass, sang their song of victory.
They did not stop at rooting up the
goal posts, but carried away all the
markers which lined both sides of the
field.
A play by play account of the game
will be found on page six.
TOKIO.-The cabinet voted to make
enforcement of Japan's alien land law
effective Nov. 10, next.
MEET THE TAM
The Student council made an
appeal last night for students to
meet the team. The special train
bearing the squad and band will
arrive at 10 o'clock this morning,
and the student special will ar-
rive a half an hour later.
Michigan's team faces one of
the most difficult schedules in
j the country this year, and the
Navy game marks the half way
mark in the six hard games. If
tha m1varina r chian + o ui

NANDIEOKE
TAKES NINE

Traveled Independently
BLAST: Professor Hayden left the mission
L VES during its tour of the island of Min-
(danao, and with the aid of letters

(By Associated Press)
WILKES-BARRE, Pa., Oct. 30.-The
explosion which caused the death of
nine employees of the Susquehanna
Collieries company at its number
seven operation at Nandieoke, about
noon today, may be listed with other
unsolved tragedies, the anthracite
field. Rescue suads late today re-
covered the last body.
With two official investigations an-
nounced, officials pointed out that
there was little possibility of determ-
inin thoo-a-a of th? 1sie t

from General Leonard Wood, governor
general of the Philippines, made an
inspection tour independently, travel-
ing by horseback, trail, launch, and
part of the way in the Navy airplanes.
In regards to the reports of danger
to the party this summer in Zambo-
anga, Professor Hayden sajd that the
importance of the incident was con-
siderably extggerated. The trouble
arose over a dispute between the
Christian and Moro natives as to
which should lead the parade of wel-

DARTMUH, 10 -0
(By Associated Press)
HANOVER, Oct. 30.-Eleven cour-
ageous sons of Brown who had ham-
mered Yale into submission a week
ago, again played through 60 minutes
of gruelling football without a substi-
tution to defeat Dartmouth 10 to 0 on
its Memorial field today.
The victory was particularly sweet
as it broke Dartmouth's winning
streak of five games and brought the
Bruins their first triumph over the
Green since 1919.
It mattered not that cold figures
gave Dartmouth a statistical advantage
of 14 first downs to Brown's 6.

(By Associated Press)
MADISON, Oct. 30. - Minnesota
broke a three year tie with Wisconsin
by downing the fighting Badgers in
Camp Randall stadium here today,
16 to 10. Forty thousand spectators
saw a thrilling fight culminate in the
closing minutes of play when Mally
Nydahl, a substitute Gopher halfback,
caught a Wisconsin punt and raced!
65 yards for the touchdown which
meant victory.
Four times, scoring leadership,
changed as Wisconsin fought gamely
to snatch a win, and without making
a single first down they appeared to
have succeeded until the last five
minutes of play.

BIG TEN STA
W
MICHIGAN .... 2
I n. <>

NDI

NG
T Pet.,
0 1.000

L
0

to Mr. Thompson.

The Chris- I

( A

1.000

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan