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October 29, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-29

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F IDAY; OC'T OBER. 29,-1926

i DYOTBE 9.12

Published every morning except Monday
during the Uuive- year by the Board in
Control of Studer ;cations.
Members of W Conference Editorial
Association.-
The Associated ss is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited o it or not otherwise
credited in this parer and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at t e :ostoffice at Ann Arbor,,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master (General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,l
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard St et. business
P'hones: Editorial. 4925; bsnes21914. ;

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor.................W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor............Irwin A. Olian
Cewy Editors.............. Frederick Shillito
NewsEditrs.......... Philip C. Brooks
Women'slditor......... ..Marion Kubik
Sports Editor.......,....Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor............Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles 13ehymct Ellis Merry
Carlton ('hape Stanford N. Phelps
jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
Ja es Herald Cssa A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Douglas Doubleday Carl Burger
Reporters
Marlon Anderson G. Thomas McKean
Alex B3ochnowski Adeline O'Brien
Jean Cnpbell Kenneth'Patrick
Martin J. Cohn Morris Quinn
Windsor Davies Sylvia Stone
Clarence Edelson James Sheehan
William Emery Henry Thurnau
ohn Friend William Thurnau
Rkobert G~essn~er Milford Vanik
Elaine Gruber Herbert Vedder
Morton 1. Icove Marian Welles
Paul Kern Thaddeus Wasielewski
Alilton Kirshbaum Sherwood Winslow
Ervin LaRowe Thomas Winter
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. LMSTED, JR.
Advertising.................Paul W. Arnold
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising..........George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation..............T. Kenneth Haven
Publicaiin ............. .John H. Bobrink
Accountb.........rancis A. Norquist
Assistants
G. . Ahli, Jr- T.T. Greif Jr.
D. M. Brown A. M. Hinkley
M. 11. Cain E. L. Hulse
Harvey Carl S. Kerbaury
Dorothy Carpenter R. A. Meyer
Marion Daniels H. W. Rosenblum
FRIDAY, OCTOER 29, 1 26
Night Editor--C ,ITRTLAND SMITH
A STEP FORWARD

ed critic! The retailing of these un-
certain confessions is in itself a shal-
low business. But when one ma, in
no evidentstouch with the situation,
presumes to stand the authority of
two young, impressionable, publicity-
seeking people against the sincere and
weighty opinions of faculties and col-
lege presidents, one must suspect his
motive.
It is such men who are making more
difficult the administration of univer-
sity affairs. They set themselves in
the highways and byways as spreaders
of light. Instead they are selecting
isolated examples, their evidence is,
at best, doubtful, and they are pre-
suming to hand the lie in public to
conscientious, sincere men.
It is to be hoped that these self-
appointed critics will soon be driven
out of the limelight and out of the
headlines of the press so that college
life may be represented, pro and con
at once, by the people who know
actualities and facts. Only in this way
may the people of the country really
know and understand conditions in
their educational institutions. The
universities need no mouthpiece from
without. They are the recorders and
publishers of each of their own min-
ute phases, in truth and entirety.
FOR OUR MARINE
In the involved system of modern
business, it is impossible for some
government expenditures, while bring-
ing no direct return, to foster an in-
stitution beneficial to the whole coun-
try. To a large extent, this applies to
federal aid which will enable Amer-
ican shipping, still in the "infant in-
dustry" stage, to meet foreign compe-
tition.
Belief in the practicability of this
viewpoint has led President Coolidge
and the Budget bureau to recommend
a $4,500,000 increase in the shipping
board appropriation, when it learned
that certain foreign companies were
planning to cut rates on the lines over
which American concerns were oper-
ating. The existence of such an
emergency fund coupled with the
notice that the government stood
ready to back its commercial marine
would undoubtedly produce the proper
psychological effect upon the theaten-
ing competitors. Realization of the
strength of the American opposition
will probably lead them to abandon
the idea of price cutting.
Appropriation of the sum requested,
even if it were actually expended,
would be a move beneficial to the na-
tion. The creation of a merchant ma-
rine would preclude discrimination
against American shippers and
would establish a training school for
American sailors as well as a valuable
part of the national defense. That
such protection will be practical and
will be required for only a limited
time is shown by the success which
some American lines have already at-
tained in the foreign trade.
Blame for a head-on electric rail-
road collision is fixed, on the painful
toothache of the motorman. It ap-
pears~ that the Interstate Commerce
commission will have to appoint a
dental inspector in the interests of
safety.

OASTED ROLL
JOIN THE
VARSITY T
AND SEE
THE WORLD
Yesterday was "Navy Day."
Tomorrow is "Michigan Day."
"Navy Day," postponed one day in
Ann Arbor on account of rain, was
celebrated yesterday with a big pa-
rade of the Horse Marines, a meeting
of the Tolstoy league, and an uliasual-
ly rough 8:40 riot at the Maj. The
police were home in bed resting up
for the expected excitement Saturday
night.
* * *
Throwing aside professional jeal-
ousy, the Horse Marines turned out
in great number to support the Navy
in whatever the present campaign is
about.
The Tolstoy league celebrated by
holding a meeting, with the discussion
centering around Tolstoy for a change.
The team and the band weren't the
only ones to leave town yesterday for
Baltimore. Admiral Ixzo, represent-
ing the Horse Marines, left in his
famous horse and buggy late yester-
day afternoon -
* * *
OFF FOR THE GAME
W e e # -. I.-
* * *
Admiral Ixzo will address the
Alumni banquet tonight in Philadel-
phia on the subject, "The Place of the
Buggy in Higher Education." He will
urge the alumni to support his, or-
ganization in its efforts to bring back
the good old buggy era, by driving to
football games in buggies themselves
hereafter.
* * *
The exclusive story of Admiral
Ixzo's trip will appear only in ROLLS.
Furthermore, he will not write his
confessions for the Times News.
LATEST
BARBED-WIRE TWEEDS
For theater wear
"Kernel" reports the following con-
versation as having taken place at
the Junior literary elections:
Senior to frosh-"Some of those
juniors are putting in three votes
apiece, but I am going to be honest
and just put in one.
* * *
SHED SOME MORE TEARS
TEAR GAS will be spread rather
heavily around the School of Music,
in the hope that maybe it will stop the
noise.

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA
THIS AFTERNOON: The Play Pro-
duction classes present three one act
plays, "Manlikin(I andl Miniikin", "Riders
to the Sea" and ",The Man with the
Boeler Hat" in University hall audi-
torium at 3 o'clock.
FROM SYNGE TO MILNE
Activities of the Play Production
and Direction classes will receive their
first public inspection at 3 o'clock this
afternoon in the University hall audi-
torium with the presentation of three
one-act plays. The event will be of
double importance to those interested
in campus dramatics because it will
represent the first work in that line
which has been done under the direc-
tion of David Owen, latest addition to
the public speaking faculty. The pro-
ductions are being staged under some-
what of a handicap in that it is still
early for the course to function, es-
pecially under new leadership. Re-
hearsals have been going, on for little
over two weeks, and they have been
under the direction of several stu-
dents, Mr. Owen merely acting in a
supervising capacity. He wishes it
understood particularly thatsthe
greater part of the work has been done
by the individual students. There will
be no admission charged for the per-
formances this afternoon, and any one
who is interested is welcome.
The three plays to be given have
been selected from a group of seven
which have been under rehearsal. The
first is a fantastic bit from the pen of
Alfred Kremymborg entitled "Manikin
and Minikin" wherein two porcelain
dolls come to life. It is directed by
Margaret Lord. The second is "Riders
To The Sea" by J. M. Synge, directed
by Mary Gudekunst and Catherine
Geesey. It is a realistic drama of the
Irish sea folk and their inherent
fatality. The third play, which may
give way to another, is. a satiric bur-
lesque on the acting of two or three
generations ago, and it is written in
the inimitible style of A. A. Milne.
This piece is directed by Ruth Mc-
Cann, and is entitled 'The Man In The
Bowler Hat."
Glimpses of the rehearsals presage
wel for the reception of the produc-
tions, and at least an interesting after-
noon should be afforded those attend-
ing: Mary Lois Kudekunst is also di-
recting Comedy Club's "Tea for Three"
I and is excellent; Ruth McCann and
Margaret Lord are possessed of a
happy faculty for stage proportion;
and the Synge Irish peasant dramas
are always popular-witness the run
of "Juno and the Paycock" last year in
New York.
* * "
MUSICAL COMEDY IN DETROIT
Two exceptional musical shows and
one so-so ,comedy are now playing in
Detroit: the "Song of the Flame" and
the "Passing Show" 1926 edition are
the pick of the lot; "Yes, Yes, Yvette"
is holding its own, and will probably
last through a longer run.
The "Song of the Flame" is an
Arthur Hammerstein production, pre-
tentions and with a wonderful ballet
is now at the Shubert-Lafayette and
wil easily run into another week.
Tessa Kosta and Guy Robertson and
as much of the original company as
ever survives for the Detroit and

Chicago companies is presenting the
play which boasts a Russian art choir
of 60 and an American ballet and aug-
mented orchestra. Alive Weaver and
Shep Camp are also in the cast, Miss
Weaver doing some very good toe
work. The opera is romantic (the
background of the Russian revolt of
1917 is used) and is beautifully
staged. The music is by George
Gershwin and Herbert Strothart with
Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein
doing the book and lyrics.
The New York Winter Garden Revue
"The Pasing Show of 1926" is now in
an indefinite run at the Schubert-De-
troit. Incidently this is the third
Schubert revue to play in the city in
the last month. The most unique
thing about the show is that it was
swung from first rehearsal into a pre-
miere in exactly four weeks. Which
means that the leading lady lost
twenty pounds, the Winter Garden'
Brigade of 100 famous beauties 100
were blessed in terms of the Black

Granger
Enterprises
Good music still available
for week-end of Wisconsin
game-November 5 and 6.

I

91

Friday and Saturday Special
- P
enory Books
Size 11 X 14
Block M Cover s 100 Pages
At Both Ends of
Th~eDiago9al

Dancing Every
Wednesday, 8-10
Friday, 9-1
Saturday, 9-12

Phone 5822 and

arrange

Music by Jack Scott's "Wolverines."

for a band.
H. E. Boxer
Director

I

GRANGER'S ACADEMY

/,

-q I.

" "+.

I

DON'T
MAK E
PAT HS
ON THE
CA MPU S

MAKE '
MANN'S COLL M M
Style - Quality .Service
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and nleblocked
Fine Work Only!
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burned Sweats
F
Factory Hat Store

Have you heard
THE NEW
VIVA-TONAL
COLUMBIA
tile newest and latest
achievement
in tone production?
"LIKE LIFE ITSELF"
Bear them play our latest Jits'
at 805 Maynard St.
Almenndinger's Music Shop ;

f

617 Packard St.
(Where A. U. R. Stops

Phone 7115
at State)

Return to normalcy has come so
slowly since the World war that any
small step in that direction is ex-
tremely encouraging; and particularly
so if that step involves stabilization
of currency and credits. With this
'act in mind, it is truly gratifying to
learn that. Belgium, one of the prin-
cipal sufW'ers-of the'"war has stabi-
lizad t edrarW and also a medium for
foreign--trade, Q Belga, which will
again put on a srd basis the mone-
tary system of th:t country.
Perhaps with ,-eps toward progress
all around her, even France will soon
come to a saner viewpoint and attempt
to rehabilitate tihe franc with foreign
aid, rather than persist in its attempt
to" restore it to its fd rmer value.
American capital is willing to lend
aid, as is shown in the helgium ar-
rangement, to a nation that is sincere
about recovering its credit;, and if
Belgium can secure fifty millions of
dollars in the United States, there is
So reason to suppose that France
would be unable to float a proportion-
al loan. It would be an investment in
progress from the standpoint of
America.
NO MOUTHPIECE NEEDED
Followers of the trend of contem-
porary college life have, sadly enough,
become accustomed to the frequent
exposures of ex-woman students, and
confessions of "disillusioned" college
rnen similar to the one by Wilbert 0.
Cross, whose impressions of college
life as a "gin-drinking, nocturnal pet-
ting, helluva good time" life were pub-
lished in a prominent church: organ
early this September. In the course
of time, however, these followers have
also learned to discount these rabid
discussions in the light of true con-
ditions. They have come to accept
these exposures as a comment on only
a minute minority and not on college
life as a whole. This change has been
brought about by the reports of col-
lege presidaints revealing things as
they saw them in practice, and by the
sincere eforts of college students to
have themselves rightly judged.
One as now astonished therefore by!
the speech of Horace J. Bridges, leader
of the Chicago Ethical society, before
that organization recently. The old
charges of Cross and a woman studentt
were introduced again as "logical
evidence." But worse than this was
th at part of the speech in which
Bridges said, "I dismiss as lundicrous
the easy vindications and various as- .

t
s
.
T
L
3j
l
3

at State)

S

1i

QU KALITY.
v v " 0
RI4g.

.l
r"

Hunting Season Is Here

And you can find most anything you need for a successful trip
at this store-Shotguns, single and double barrel, also repeaters,
priced from $8.50 to $100. Rifles, $7.50 to $26.00 for the
deer hunter. 30-30 Winchester, $35.00. Dux-Bak hunting
coats, $5.50-$8.75. Dux-Bak Hunting Pants, $5.00-$5.50.
Dux-Bak Hunting Caps, $1.75-$2.00.
Shells and Ammunition of any kind.
Jno. C. Fischer Co.

Po,
q.QUAUTY
~~ i
* UALrrY.
o O a

w,

TEAR GAS may even be
stop policemen from smoking
beats.

used to!
on their

I

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants wilt however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

PRE-CONCERT CRITICISM
To The Editor:
If in the two years I have been here
the musical criticisms were of a type
that Mr. Reninger desires, I am sure
that The Daily would have been the
recipient of a letter on "Our Musical:
Critic" and I would not have waited
for my fifth year.
The Music and Drama column is a '
healthy institution. Youth! confident!
of its capabilities-sincere; and hu-
man wherein it is occasionally car-
ried away by words.
But its forte is, it reviews the local
concerts and not the press notices.
I am under the impression that the
type of criticism Mr. Reninger wants
could be written before the concert.
"Kreisler last night gave a superb
demonstration of his artistry, before I
a packed Hill auditorium. His tech-
nique was a revelation, his tonal depth
incomparable....'
Of Kreisler's or Schumann-Heink's,
or Hoffman's capabilities, we have no
doubts. Their reputation is establish-
ed. The column has not been review-
ing reputations. A headache, a slight-
ly uncomfortable stomach, a trip in
a dusty Pullman, some uninspiring
contemplations on life..... They all
have their effects. '
But pshaw, you either agree with a
critic or you don't and as long as the
criticism is sincere and woll writ-

* * *
TEAR GAS will be released in the
stands at future football games here
whenever one of those broadcasting
stations starts telling how the play
would have been executed if he had,
been substituting for Benny.
NOTICE TO FROSH CONTRIBS
Rolls will not accept any puns
about the decorations for the J-Hop
being of a Winterish mode.
Is the Republican club going to take
chArgeof welcoming Queen Marie to
Ann Arbor?
OUR OWN SURVEY
In connection with the Union's
survey of how many use the build-
ing Saturday, we took a littlet
census of our own to find out how
many used the Alumni Memorial
hall that day. We didn't have any
of the instruments they used, so
we had to count with our fingers.
We alnost had to use both hands,
except that the janitors got in
before we started counting.
* * *
The cannon in front of the County
building is being overhauled by po-
lice, and will be ready for use in the
next theater rush.
* * *
One sophomore thinks he is a com-
bination of the "Strong Man" and the
"Black Pirate'.' He plans to "rush"
the Rae all by himself.
* * *
Bob O Link writes in with the com-
niaint that hp waqn tn 1k-i ii :--

RIO

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Washington Near Main

Main Near Washingtom

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.,

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Am

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Mass so many times that the
can say the litany backwards, and that
the whole company crammed -fifteen
working hours into the twenty-four.
The production itself contains thirty-
three scenes, the music with the ex-
ception of two tunes is awful, the
comedy good; music by Coots, Hup-
filr Timhar-~ 1rioct1y :r-n dnne

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