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October 28, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-28

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~PA~ FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUtRSDAY, OCTOER 28, 1926

Ai

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Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated PFs is exclusively en-[
titled to the use for republication of all news1
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
c- -itedtin this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
1Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
o£ .tase sgranted s by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription 'by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
):'I"-,. Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones:tEditorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor'...... ....W.Calvin Patterson
City Editor...........rwin A. Olian
Frederick Shillito'
News Editors.... . hlpC rooBs
omen's Editor. .. ..Marion Kubik
Sports Editor ........Wilton A. Simpson
TegraliEdtor...... ...Morris Zwer fin;
Music and Drama. .......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
-Night Editors,

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C.harles IBehymuet
Carl o'niChaiupe
Jo Chaimberlin
Assista

Marion Anderson
Alex Bochnowski
Jean ampbell
MfarvnJ.Cohn
Windsor IDavies
Ci_;r('3 e I dlsoo)

S EllisMerry
Stanford N. Phelps
Courtland C. Smith
Crssam A. Wilson
ant City Editors
Carl Burger
Reporters
G. Thomas McKean
Adeline O'Brien
Kenneth Patrick
Morris Quinn
Sylvia Stone
Jamies Sheehan'
Hem y Thurnau
W'~illiam Thurnau
\llurd Vantik
erbert edder
ri ill xWeller.
C wee t

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lRUSL, SS STAFF
Tel ne 21214
SS MANAGER
THOMA S 1. OLMSTED, JR.
Paul W. Ainold
A+S, ' .n . ... ..iVilian C. Pusc
. . ..hoa Sunderland
Ad c x George H. Annable, Jr.
Cm '''Utc~...............T. Kenneth Haven
Pu hation . .. .John H. Bobrink
..Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
C , 1 ' Alt,. Jr. T. T. Greil Jr
D M. Brown A. M. 'Hinley
M. 1. Cain E. L. Hulse
Harvey Carl S. Kerbaury'
Dorothy Carpenter R. A. Meyer
Marion Daniels H. W. Rosenblum
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1926
Night Editor-JAMES T. HERALD
THE LEAGUE TO DEFRAUD
Pe rcent decision of the State
Supremi(Court in regard to Michi-
gan's law prohibiting the publication
of olds on athletic contests again
bIin So t1e fore the ot-mooted ques
lou of race ,track gambling inMichi-
gan. it is true, to be sure, that the evil
has been practically done away with
in the state; but still thousands cross
the Detroit River every summer, for
the purpose of beating the pari-mutuel
machines on the races.
In the great mechanical age in
which we live, Americans have acquir-
ed a great deal of respect for machin-
ery in every other line, it seems. They
trust their lives behind a gasoline
engine, and they step into elevators
and rise ten or a dozen floors without
a quIam. It is truly an anomaly, then,
hat they refuse to believe that the
:4' :'W44 8.1fl machine at the race track
iin o:aten-for it is as me-
8h1 n":y - ,;.iild as any machine can
La d j ator is as sure of his
u :;uz a 'investor in stadium
bonds-except that he does not have
to ait as long, and his returns are
larger.
It may Abe only the weaker willed
u *' tI a Ueud to be protected
tormt1 eil; it. may be a perverted
so7 f ' got:sm that moves men to
d efymechaical certainties; whatever
it i:, no means should be overlooked
in wiping out the tendency as com-
pletely'and as ,quickly as possible. It
is 2l( ,' h,: lb i''ecision of Michi-
gan's; court does .not seriously affect
the law ains .publication of odds,
which:is one of the most effective
way s to siamp out betting, for the de-
t:> ; the publication
t# eUi Y AC i vent is over, and
a '' be made then
If th remainder of the law-that
; ;,1ll "o ni"3 i.;eminaion o,
odds; before the race-is enforced, it
viiaim,- I deal in combating'
# vi au 11; .iincouraged by a sis-
r u0dn aid many eastern states
rely ftr the paltry revenue which
the pari-matuel tax gives to them.
I;.LiN TiAiES THE REINS j
Uncr the directorship of Georgian
1t.in who for a time at least will
have the opportunity to carry into ef-
fect his new economic policy, Russia
will adopf a quieter attitude toward
the rest of the nations, expenditures
will be materially cut down, loans will
be floated in foreign countries, and
the rehabilitation of industry will be
unrlvtnken withut 'mkin th -nas-

that of Stalin would have been
adopted. I
This latest leader of the Bolshevist
regime has proceeded on the assump-
tion that because the peasantry has
never accepted the communistic theo-
ries they are a constant menace to the
present regime, and the only way to
assure its success is to placate them.
On the other hand Trotsky still main-
tains that the communistic ideal must
be upheld and that if necessary to do
this the peasants must be forced into
line by the use of stringent methods.
It would seem that the policy of
Stalin is more likely to be conducive
to ultimate success for the commu-
nistic government-that is of course
if it ever can be successful at all. It
is a rather current rumor that already
the peasantry are organizing at least
politically, and of course, if this is
true, unless some concessions are
made to them they will sooner or later
command enough power to prove an
active menace to communism. This
"cool-headed opportunist"-Stalin -
has sensed the seriousness of the sit-
uation and intends to make the most
of the single opportunity to save com-
munism in Russia.
GOVERNMENT COOPERATION
Development of Detroit as an avia-
tion center received another boost
when the army, navy, and department
of commerce pledged their cooperation
to obtain the necessary authority for
use of Grassy island as a municipal
airport. The site is declared ideal and
will be a welcome addition to the avia-
tion facilities of the community.
Likewise, the announcement that
Detroit is to have a reserve unit of the
naval air service providing Congress
appropriates suficient money at the
short session this winter is of inter-
eCt to those interested in aviation. The
successful backing of this measure in
Congress by Michigan representatives
would materially assist the air devel-
opment program of this district.
SO ENDS A CAREER
With the, recent resignation of Her-
bert Henry Asquith, First Earl of Ox-
ford and Asquith, ended one of the
longest and most momentuous careers
of any Englishman of recent decades
--leader of the often great Liberal
party.
Although his resignation has been
looming as almost inevitable because
of the quarrel with Lloyd George last
May over the attitude that the Liberal
party should take toward th general
strike, still any man who has reached
his 75th year, and has been for the
best part of half a century in public
life, serving as Prime Minister for a
I long consecutive term and a still
longer time as leader of his party,
may with just grace seek retirement.
The generous spirit of this great
man can be demonstrated no more fit-
tingly than by quoting his own words
upon his resignation. "Though my
health has been restored, I feel the
anxieties and responsibilities of lead-
ership ought not to be undertaken or
continued by anyone who cannot
be reasonably certain that he can
stand the strain. I do not contemplate
retirement from public life and hope
that I may be of some service to the
State and to Liberalism....1.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants wil,dhowever, be'regarded as
+ confidential upon request.
A FAIR MINDED REPLY
To The Editor:

have read with great interest your
editorial The Shallow Mind" in The
Michigan Daily of October 17, 1926.
My first thought is that you are
loyal to the,. University of Michigan.
You abuse me and call me names. I
do not object to that at all. However,
loyalty to the University is not in-
volved with being loyal to any one
man on earth. It is fair to judge of a
tree by its fruits. Dr. Little has been
particularly unfortunate in public ut-
terance. In the matter of prohibition,
which is a vital issue in the Univer-
sity and everywhere, he stammered.
l'o mi.e subject of birth control,
which is not a serious issue anywhere,
and certainly not in the University of
Michigan, he took a peripheral posi-
t on. If he grows, and he will out-
fold, he wtll be sorry and ashamed of
his birth control record within less
than a quarter of a century.
I enclose the full text of my criti-
cism of Dr. Little, which was written
to the Sault Ste. Marie News and was
invoked by an editorial in that paper.
If I am ift error, then no harm will
have been done; if I am right, good
will follow.
As to whether I am "shallow and
inane" does not matter. I am not
President of the University of Mich-'
igan. It is fair, proper and important
to discuss Little's fitness for the great(
4 -5 4 o1-.n n 4n... WYr.... 4-. is .. .+-- -

0CALL THE COPS!
Football is not the most interestingj
sport in Ann Arbor. More students
take part in the Maj 8:40 fight every
night than participate in a football
game, when Minnesota is knocking
them out right and left.
The popular boast now is: "I made
the 8:40 last night in 80 minutes flat."
* * *
The Maj should have an usher
and half of their police force out
in front to line up the students
and townspeople as they gather
forthat long wait for the second
show. After all, it's the manager's
responsibility to get his patrons
in safely.
" R
SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST

O~iiii RLL
MAN'S
INHUMANITY
TO MAN
Many questions * were asked the
Union information booth men last
Saturday. Most of them were funny
but a few were serious. Now, if they I
would only open that booth some day
when the building wasn't filled with
alumni trying to buy or sell football
tickets and a student could get in, wel
would ask a few questions.
* * x*
For instance, Mr. Information,
where is that committee that was to
adjust the highway robbery inflicted
on all students except the entering'
class, wherein they pay extra for a
life membership which they never re-
ceive?
* * s
And, now that you are handing over,
the building, even the tap room, to
women, are you going to give them
representation on the Boardl
t 0
And why should the women go to
the trouble of raising several hundred
thousand dollars from alumni, when
these men might better pay off a part
of the Union debt and then make the

name fit the facts-calling it
Alumni Union?
* * *

the

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MUSIC
M U ANID
DRAMA
"TEA FOR THREE"
As its first dramatic venture of the
year, Comedy Club will present Roi
Cooper Megrue's satirical farce "Tea
For Three" in the Mimes theater on
November 5 and 6. The cast, although
it cannot be announced in full will in-
clude Minna Miller, who has been
prominent for the past three years in
campus dramatics, having played the
feminine lead of Becky in "Becky Be-
have," the Junior Girls Play of last
year, as well as being prominently
cast in "The Cradle Song" and other
productions of Masques and Comedy
Club, and James Martin who played
in Mimes' "Engaged" and in "The
Camberley Triangle." Others in the
cast are Vera Johnson, active in
dramatics several years ago, and who
has returned after two years in pro-
fesional musical comedy, and Harland
Christie who played in "You Never
Can Tell."
The play contains but three major
roles, the eternal triangle: the wife,
the husband and the tertium quid.
This situation is not in itself original
or clever; it has been overdone and
underdone since the inception of the
drama. But the treatment in "Tea
For Three" is entirely different, for
here this situation is satirized, bur-
lesqued broadly and turned against it-
self. The farcial element is elaborate
and potentially serious to an extent
that brings out tully the point of the
piece.
Comedy Club which is a member of
the triumvrate on the campus which
governs all principal actives in drama-
tics produced several outstanding
plays last season, notably Bernard
Shaw's "Great Catherine" which
played for ten performances in Ann
Arbor to capacity audiences at every
f performance, and could be playing yet!
"You Never Can Tell," also by Shaw
commanded packed ;houses, and al-
though it was damned for being too
long (Shaw and Shakespeare have
never in the history of the profession
been successfully cut) it was popular
for other reasons.
* * *
"NO, NO, NANETTE"
Everything that might have been said
about this show has been said: it has
not beenon the boards for three years
without criticism of each detail to be
noted in the dramatic columns of every
newspaper in the country. It's popu-1
larity is without question-good lines,
good music (even if some of the num-
bers are hoary with age) and a sure
fire production.
The company at the Whitney last
night might not have been of the best,
and attitude of the audience rather in-
dicated that Ann Arbor has seen its
last presentation of this show; but the
fact that there are five companies in
Europe speaks for itself.
THE ORGAN RECITAL
A review, by Elaine Gruber
Had an artist heard it, he would
have heard from the depth of the
organ the golds, the deep, rich purples
and the somber grays which he had
tried to etch upon his canvas. Had
an actor heard it, he would have found
an inspiration attuning his tempera-
ment to every emotional intensity
needed to sway the hearts of any
group, however diverse. Had a stu-
dent heard it, he would have heard the
echo of all the struggles and the at-

tainments which had been his during
his years of endeavor, while the com-
moner would have discovered in the
music's depth, the tragedies and the
happinesses which had been crowded
into his life. And the musician listen-
ing to the voice of the organ would
have been confronted by every conflict-
ing emotion possible, feeling in the
organ's grandness, the harmony, the
feeling, the depth and technique, which
'had already meant years of toil and
hardship and which spell struggle and
hardship in the future.
And this, though weakly put, tries to
explain the recital offered by Palmer
Christian, Wednesday afternoon in
Hill auditorium. Starting with the
grandissimo of Maitland's "Concert
Overture," he carried his listeners
through realms of fantasy, through the
depths of despair into the heights of
hope and loveliness, through the la-
mentations of lovers, to bring them
finally to the climax in that immense
creation of Wagner's, "March (Tan-
hausser)," excelling even the opening
selection, rendering it all as only
Palmer Christian could with that
marvel of technique and feeling which
marks the artist. The choice of the
selections from Tanhausser probably
swayed the listeners more than any
others, expressing the broken-hearted
lover in "Eliazbeth's Prayer," in such
emotional intensitv as only music. so

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REPAIRING

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MAN N'S CM*
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Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burned Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)

F

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Prepared-Foods
MARGARET'S
Open Thursda , Friday, Satur.
day and Sunday Evenings
'until 11:00.
Fountain Service.

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Grailhamsa a
Hollowe'en Decorations
And
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a 111llrirtririritllllrlr1111111llrltlllltrlt E'a~llr~~rI IIE1t1E11N~~t1Et111 1lttr

I

The new campaign song: "8:40 And'
Fight."
SOME MORE GAS
TEAR GAS is expected to stop all
hazing of freshmen in the future. Class
games will be broken up with gas at-
tacks and police billies.
* C *
TEAR GAS, it is planned by the po-
lice department, will drive all alumni
from the fifty yard seats at the' Wis-
consin game. So that officers may
have even better seats.
1* * *
WEAR SPIKED SHOES ,
ANDGET INTO THE MAJ. A
WITHOUT BEING CRUSHED
* * *
DARROW WILL SPEAK
Clarence Darrow, famous product of'
evolution and lover of animals and
criminals, has accepted the invitation
to address the student bodies on the
need of grass for horses.
The lecture will be delivered in Es-
peranto, in order that the 4,000,000,000
people who speak this language will
be able to understand. (The figures in
The Daily Sunday were wrong). This
should not keep anyone away, how-
ever, as the universal language will
be translated into English for those
of the audience who happen to speak
that archaic tongue.
Kernel.
* * *
* 0
Sneak a student into the strong-
hold of the customers! Help
ROLLS buy one of those Stadium
bonds, the resulting good seatsE
going to two students elected by
the campus at large.
MARINES PREPARE FOR ACTION
Teak gas and shrapnel will be used
by the Horse Marines, if necessary, to
keep order in the Tolstoy meeting
this afternoon, Admiral Ixzo announc-
ed last night. The police will handle
the situation by themselves unless
they run out of tear gas, in which case
the artillery unit of the Marines is
to be brought into play.
* * *
It is believed that with these meas-
lures the vast crowds expected to seek f
entrance will be handled with very
little loss of life, and that the meeting
I __,.,---- -_--I

O00 E. Liberty St.

Phone 9215

s a
- Have You Paid Your
Suscriptiion to.th a
Michigan Daly
aa
All subscriptions of $3.75 not paid by Novembera
15th advance to $4.25. After November 20th,al
unpaid subscriptions will be sopdand billd'
Sat the rate of 5c pe isae
Hos Manger
a House naDily

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