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October 23, 1926 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-23

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SATURDAY, OCTODER. 23, 1926

PA GE r, OUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BU L.L E T IN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the President until
3:30 p. in. (11:30 a. in. Saturdays).
Volume VII SA'T1'RIJA Y, OCTOBER 23, 1926 Number 23
Michigan-Wjisconsin-Illinois Debate:
Students wishing to submit questions for the Michigan Debates with
Illinois and Wisconsin should 1ave the same with Mr. Densmore at the Uni-
versity Extension Service Office not later than October 27.
R. D. T. Hollister.
The Ann Arbor Scout Leaders' Association will hold its opening ban-
quet at 6:15 Monday, October 25, at the Presbyterian church, Huron and
Division Sts. All students who have had Boy Scout experience are invited
to attend, notifying Scout Headquarters, phone 7215, of their intention.
Fielding H. Yost, Scout Commissioner.
Student Volunteer Group:
Mrs. Helen Elgie Scott will talk to the Student Volunteer Group on
"What twenty-five years in the Orient means to me," at Wesley Hall, at
9:15, Sunday morning. Mrs. Scott has been a pioneer in educational mis-
sionary work in China, Japan, and Turkey.
These meetings of the Student Volunteers are open to all students who
are interested in foreign missionary work.
Wells Thoms, President.
Men's Educational Club:
There will be a meeting of the Men's Educational club Monday, at 7:00
p. m.. in room 304 of the Michigan Union, for the purpose of electing officers
for the current school year. Professor James B. Edmonson will speak.
Everybody interested in Education is cordially invited.
J. D. Cooper, Chairman.
University of Michigan Band:
Meet at Morris Hall today 1:15 p. in. sharp. Uniform with cape.
Gordon Packer, Drum Major.
Graduate English Club:
The election of officers for the coining year will be held at the first
meeting, Monday, Oct. 25, at 8 p. in., in Room 316, Michigan Union. Words-
worth and Keats: A Study in Influence.
P. V. Kreider.
PROFSSOR TRUEBLOOD RETURNS
FROM TOUR; TO GO TO FLORIDA

LAWYERS HEAR
LEIDY ADDRESS
School Secretary Stresses Importance
Of Continued Reading
"Slight details should never be over-
looked, because they affect many a
case," declared Prof. Paul A. Leidy,
secretary of the law school, speaking
to a group of more than a hundred
students at the all-law smoker, held
at the Lawyer's club Thursday night.
Professor Leidy outlined the trials and
tribulations of a cub in a law firm,
who has to do thesroutine work, such
as preparing briefs and memoranda.
A lawyer must try to be the first on
the scene of an accident, take photo-
graphs for evidence, and line, up as
many witnesses as possible before the
other fellow gets them. He must for-
mulate his case from the tales of these
witnesses, who often tell the most con-
flicting stories, declared the secretary.
"A vast amount of reading is re-
quired even after graduation," declar-
ed Professor Leidy," and working on a
law review is one of the best ways
to prepare ones-self for a career in
law. The student delves into ancient
and almost forgotten cases and learns
to differentiate between good prece-
dents and bad ones. He illustrated
his points by citing cases from his
own experiences while connected with
an Ohio law firm before coming to the
University this fall.
In the preparation of briefs, Pro-
fessor Leidy went on to say, a lawyer
must give a history of the case, then
cite similar cases and decisions given,
after .which he makes a statement of
the facts and attempts to convince the
court that his facts are correct and
prove them by evidence.
"A great many students," declared
Professor Leidy, "ask as to what they
should charge a client. This depends
a great deal on how much business is
transactedwith the person in question,
and naturally a regular client is
charged less than a stranger."
Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.

TROOPS MANEUVRE FOR
PRESIDENT OF GERMANY

I -''u.1411)~~JT
CONCERT SERIES
c ix numbers of the Michigan State
Normal college concert series at Ypsi-E:
l n i have just been announced, the
I tl stanclin;engagement being that of \W e have for your enter-
Ih. Sigrid Onzegin of the Metropoli-
kaopera. The series will open on
:27 with te Detroit Symphony or- -taining this week-end, a
ostra. Carl Fireberg, pianist, I.o
Peorges Larrere, flutist, and Lewis specal brCk o Rasp-
Richards, harpsichordist, and others
ill complete the concert series..'- iy-ou se'V nlla
and Caramel. Try it!
Cap 'n' Gown
Come over to the Cap 'n' Gown
And try our waffles, crisp and
brownDial
Or take a sandwich home with
a c
you
To share with Betty, Jane, or
Sue.
751East University Ave.A NRRI
Hours, 11 A. 31.-11 P. FI. -
"The Home of Pure Milk"
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Michigan
Decorations-
BLANKETS -
PEN NA NTS.-
SPLENDID ASSORTMENT - - -

4'

BANNERS
PILLOWS

I I r.
VON HINDENTIWR1
President of Germany who dons his
military garb as commander-in-chief
of the German armies to review the
troops at recent demonstrations at
Bad Mergentheim.

I

- - - - - PRICES RIGHT
UNIVERSITY'
BOOK STORE

Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood returned
recently to Ann Arbor for a short
visit before motoring to Florida for
the winter. Prof. Trueblood coniplet-
ed at the close of the summe r session
his 42nd year as a teac-her of public
speaking. In his long stay at the
University, Trueblood bas coached de-
bate teams and orators that have ei ad
the middle west forensic field for the
past 'l0 years. Upon his esignation,i
Prof. R. D. T. iollister wAis appoinited
head of the department of public
speaking.
At the close of the Summer session
Prof. Trueblood and Mrs. Trueblood
motored to points in uorthwestern
Illinois and to Chicago, where theyI
visited their children. From Chicago
Mr. and Mrs. Trueblood journeyed to1
Los Angeles where relatives were vis-
ited. While in Los Angles Prof.
Trueblood was called upon numerous

times to address Michigan alumni
clubs. Trueblood addressed the pub-
lic speaking department of the Uni-
versity of Southern California, of
which Prof. Immel is the head. Prof.
Inimel was several years ago on the
faculty staff of the public speaking
department at Michigan.
P Prof. Trueblood with Mrs. Trueblood
plan to leave Ann Arbor in about three
weeks to motor through the South to
Florida. His plans are to travel slow-
ly and stop at universities and points
of interest on the way, especially the
schools in Virginia and around Wash-
ington. l3ardenton, on the western
coast of Florida, will be the True-
blood's home during the winter
Smonths where warm weather will af-
fordl the playing of Mr. Trueblood's
favorite game of golf, of which sport
lhe coached the varsity team.

Benefits Of Early American Ambitions
In Education Told By Julius H. Barnes
"America is realizing on its early industry that cause America to be
educational aspiration that made the pre-eminently ahead in business.
public school the common heritage of "They come to learn,''went on.Mr.
every child, and owes its prosperity I
and progress to the foresight of the arnes, "what it is in Anerica's phil-
nation's founders," declared Julius H1. osophy that has in so short a space
Parnes, former president of the Cham- of time put shoes oil children of the
her of Commerce, in a recent speech. poor, robbed unemployment of halif
"The fathers of America recognized its terrors, furnished America n homes
that the mainspring of effort was in- with countless improvemneints, such
dividual impulse, and that a man as electric lights,, steam heat, and tel-
must be assured of a fair field and ephones, built six hundred thowaiid
equal chanee to put forth his best miles of hard surfaced roads on which
creative effort." twenty million automobiles run, with
Delegations from all countries of the the most effective service to busness
world arrive in America annually, to and the greatest idividuml enjoyment
study organization and methods of of any faculty ever known."

~- AT THE -

AT
Stag

LAST-A place where respectable dancing can
as well as Couple plan-Where the Music will
And where Pep Predominates.

be enjoyed
be of the

on the
Best-

"JOE" BURROUGHS' TROUBADOURS

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Lined and Unlined

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for Dress and Knockabout Wear
We are showing every conceivable
shade and style for your approval.
Priced $4.50 to $12.00 the pair.
' We carry nothing but the best.
TINKER & COMPANY
South State St. at William St.

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Saturday and All Next Week Special
Offering of

"Printzess" and "Wooltex"

Coats

,

$59.50 and $98.50
In this year of coat scarcity, owing to the prolonged strike in New York, we have been
favored by the PRINTZESS and WOOLTEX Companies with complete deliveries of
the wanted coats. In co-operation with these two companies we shall offer Saturday and
all next week two specially priced groups of coats at even less than last winter's prices. If
you need a coat this Fall, this will be your opportunity.

74

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New models that speak instantly
of distinction and the best of
the fall mode, for nothing could
1)e smarter nor more charming
than the Printzess wraps we
are featuring during Printzess
Week.
So wonderfully rich in fabric
and fur trimming that many are
sure to show a preference for
the cloth coat instead of a more
expensive fur garment.

The Fabrics
Bolivia
Kashmello
Lustrosa
Lorobia
Duvbloom
Vivette

The Furs
Deaver
Fox
Squirrel
Natural Wolf.
Platinum Wolf
Skunk

Developed in all the most beau-
tiful warm fall and winter fab-
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and domestic weave. Finely
tailored, perfectly finished in all
the latest silhouettes.
Fur collar and cuff set of rich
pelts-all are lined with silk or
-crepe. In regular sizes for miss-
es and women, as well as in
petite sizes for short women.

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Specially Priced for the Week at
$59.50 and $98.50

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