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October 19, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE MXJ

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GRID\ON POLIC Molenda Still Leads
Conference Scorers;
CHANE IEAS Karow Holds Second
IFor the sec(ond consecutive week,
Passing Attacks Figure in Victories; I3o Molenda, Michigan's star fullback,
Yale And ziarvard Develop leads the Western Conference scorers.
Aerial flane holders of second and third place are
also the same as a week apgo; Marty
PASSES NOW USED WIDELY I1a row, of Ohio State in the runner-
up position, with 36 points, is just two
(By Associated Press) from the top, and Gustafson, North-
NEW YORK, ,Oct. 18.-Yale and I x estern, trails with 32 markers.
NEW ORK,,.Oc. 8-Yal and Fros'ty Peters, the Iilini find, con-
Harvard, if theyfind the places in the tinned his effective work and by boot-
football sun they are aiming for this hud pir ffie gork and a poit
seaoneinattibue tis o te msting a pair of field goals and a point:
"season, ,can :attribute this to the mostatrtohd nfrsenpitse
radical shift in gridiron policy the in- moved into fourth place, as Bennett
stitutions ever have effected. of Indianaado footpheas er
Traditions and time honored meth- backield standrfaile to athe tder
ods have been swept aside in building totals. Grim of Ohio State again
the 1926 model machines of the Blue 'showed well and advanced into A tie
and Crimson. In this turnover Yale with Crofoot and Bennett with 24
already is among the leaders of thep
Eastern pack, as the result of a de- Fieds. , .
cisive defeat of the 1925 champion, F e o,'hlaseapanood2
Dartmouth, while Harvard after a bad scoring ace oft last season, booted 2
istart, is adjusting itself for better b 'ofnther hen one
Th in g s.+.o b ed o n o te n w as o s e .f rt e
The forward pass is the chief ele- Wolverine linemen was off side. Fried-
anent in both transformations. Yale ian and Oosterbaan have both been,
and Harvard have altogether started in reservensrth nemen
the East with the aerial game. As have been given scoring chances
it has developed by leaps and bounds Michigan and Ohio State, prominent-
in recent times tliey.'have been leaders ly menione fo h shon or t
Big Ten, have both shown powerful
of the old guard in keeping the offense offensive power in their early season
on the smashing attack for gain. offesepheruckeearlngesor
It was significant, therefore, that games, the Buckeyeshaing scored
Harvard's triumph over William and s119points against 21 for their oppon-
VIary as well as Yale's smashing vic- ents. The Yostmen haverun up 117
itory over Dartmouth, were due to points to 6 for their oppositionsand'
largely to. the effective use of the passi1924,tsigoanerscossed sice-
Yale, in beating Dartmouth at the 1924, the six counters coming asare-
latter's own passing game gave evi- suit of two field goals.
dece of fe possibilities. With nearly 100 points to the credit
of the Northwestern offense while
their opponents have been garnering
PIRATE PILOT but 3, is convincing proof that North-
TB western must be reckoned with when
LOSES 15111'I.H71the Conference' spoils are divided.
Though defeated by Illinois, the Hawk-
Club Owner Notifies Bill MeKetchnie eyes have shown well with a record
That Pittsburgh Funs Want Change of 70 points against 20 scored on them.
This is almost as good as that of the
PITTSBURGH, Oct. 18 Bill Me- Illini who have run up 78 against 13
for opponents. Purdue has scored ex-
Ketchnie, manager of the Pittsburgh actly twice as much as opposing elev-
National baseball club for several ens with 34 points against 17.
years past and pilot of ' the World Chicago is the only Big Ten team
Championship aggregation of 1925, which has not outscored the opposi-.
was notified by Barney Dreyfuss, tion; both the Maroons and their three
Pirate owner, tonight, that his serv- intersectional opponents have gained,
ices would not be required next year. 33 points apiece.1
Dreyfuss, after a conference late The leading individual scorers fol-

t

ILLINI STARS AT T EMPT TO DIM MEMORY OF GRANGE

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Purdue And Chicago
Center Attentions
Upon Saturday Tilt
LAFALETTE, Oct. 18.-A light
workout which spared members of the
team who had engaged in the 0-0
deadlock with Wisconsin Saturday was
the first step this week in preparation
for the Purdue-Chicago football con-
t est scheduled to take place Saturday
at Chicago.
The Purdue-Chicago football series
is one of the oldest in the Conference
and the Middle West, and this year it
has taken on special significance be-
cause of the fact that it will dedicate
Chicago's new stadium with a seating,
capacity of about 50,000.
With the Chicago team still suffer-
ing from its severe defeat at the hands
of the strong Pennsylvania eleven,'
and the strength of the Boilermakers
evidenced in the clash with Coach Lit-
tle's men, Coach Stagg will be forced
to drive his men to the limit in order
to get the best available team onto the'
Ifield.
Purdue was successful in vanquish-
ing the Maroons in the first few games
played, but it has been over two de-
cades, since Purdue has triumphed
over Stagg's eleven. The Boilermak--
ers have come close and last year
went down to a 6-0 defeat only after
a hard fight in which a brilliant for-
ward passing attack was spoiled by
the weakness of the running attack.
This year it is thought that CoachI
Phelan's offense is much stronger,
while the passing game has provedj
to be very effective. The watchword,
"Stagg fears Purdue," seems to be
Daugherity, not pictured, and Galli-
van and Leonard, the latter two being
stationed at the quarter and half
berths, respectively.
The Ghost in the center of the cut
needs no jdentification, for his deeds
against the Michigan teams for the
past several seasons have stamped
him in the vision of Wolverine rooters
for a long time to come.

HA"KEYES POINTED
FOR OHIO CONTEST
IOWA CITY, Oct. 18.-Iowa's foot-
ball team, defeated Saturday by the
Illini by a 13-6 score, is ready to take
on another keen edge in an attempt
to get revenge on the Ohio State elev-
en. The Hawkeyes turn to the east-
ern rim of the Conference for the
third game at Columbus in four years.
Each year that the Iowa aggrega-
tion has met the Buckeyes at the Ohio
stadium i4 has been successful in
downing the Ohio team, regardless of
the strong opposition which has faced
them. Four games compose the Hawk-
eye-Buckeye series and Iowa has never
lost. The limit of the Ohio State suc-
cess was a scoreless deadlock on Iowa
field in 1924.
\ Gordon Locke, well on the way to
an all-American quarterback berth,
led his champion Old Gold playersto
a 12-9 win at Columbus in 1922.;; A
year later, with mediocre material, the
Iowans registered an upset, winning
20 to 0, also at Columbus. Last fall,
Ingwerson's men proved to be better
mudders than their opponents and
smeared a surprise 15 to 0 victory -in
a clash at Columbus.
Ohio State's team, the most power-
ful seen at that institution for many
years, will be keyed to score their
initial victory, while the Hawkeyes
face a severe task in rising to their
greatest heights after the Illinois
game.
true this year.
One of the biggest handicaps to
Purdue's team this year has been tbe
number of sophomores on the team,
but the new men are rapidly gaining
experience. Injuries have also taken
their toll, the tackles being hit especi-
ally hard. Eickman, and Winkler, the
former a flashy sophomore, and the
other a seasoned veteran, were forced
out of competition because of in-
juries.

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These are some of the members
of a Grangeless Illinois team that is
hoping against hope to maintain the
prestige the Galloping Ghost gave the
team last year. In defeating the me-
diocre Hawkeye squad last Saturday
by a score of 13-6, the Illini exhibited;
a tight line and a well-balanced back-

field which will undoubtedly furn
the Wolverine eleven with some k
competition on Saturday.
After the severe injury to Jud Ti
several weeks ago, Coach Zuppke
came pessimistic about the prospe
of the squad. However, with the
velopment of his now famous "F
Mules," three of whom are pictu
above, the diminutive leader of
Indians again took on an optimi

today announced he had told the
Pirate pilot that the people of Pitts-
burgh want a change and he must
give them that henceforth.1
Dreyfuss added that he had no one
in sight for the mangerial post next1
season but hoped to land a good manJ
shortly. He said he advised Mc-
Ketchnie of his decision at this early
date so that he might look about for
another berth.
McKetchnie took over the Pirate
managerial reins in 1923 when George
Gibson resigned on short notice. At
that time he was coach and assistant
to Gibson.

low:
Molenda, Michigan
Karow, Ohio State
Gustafson, N'west'n.
Peters, Illinois ....
Bennett, Indiana ...

if

iish
een
mini
be-
Ects
de-
our
red
them
stiu 1
?et-

ers, billed as the successor to
Grange. He has already scored 28
points against three opposing teams
and he rests temporarily in fourth
position in the individual race for
Conference honors.
His record includes two touch-
downs, three field goals, and seven
points after touchdown. He has the
unique record of kicking 17 goals from
the field in a single game, a world's
mark of some sort. The other mem-
bers of the "Four Mules" include

TI. T
38 6
36 6
32 5
28 2
24 4
24 4
24 4

~AOr

FG
0
0
0
3
0
0
0

PAT
2
0
7'
0.
0

Schedules have been .drawn up for
the second round of competition, and
this week should see the playing wax
even warmer than it has during thes
past week.

Good tailored-to-order
Clothes
$40 - $50 - $60
F. W. CROSS
3i06 S. Mai

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attitude.
On the left is shown

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"Frosty" P

i'

Crofoot, Wisconsin
Grim, Ohio State ..

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FRESHMAN WRESTLERS
REPORT IN GYM TODAY
All freshmen who are interest-
ed in wrestling are urged to
repoit to Coach Peter Botchen
any afternoon from 3 to 5
o'clock on the 'second floor of
Waterman gymnasium.
The team will hold regular
practices and all freshmen ac-
cepted 'by the Coach will be ex-
cused frqm gymnasium classes
for threminder of the season.
Coach Botchen has served as
freshman coaIh here for several
years.

More than 100 men are expected to
run in the all-campus cross-country
race which will be held under the
auspices of the intramural department
the latter part of November. The race
will be over the course regularly fol-
lowed by the freshman cross-country
teams.
In order to compete in the race all
contestants must run over the course
at least nine times with the yearling
harriers, who run every Monday,.
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.
The first six men to place in the
race will be awarded jerseys with
their class numerals. All entries
should be filed with the intramural
department in Waterman gymnasium.
First week competition in the inter-
fraternity speedball tournament was
featured by many close games. The
first round finds the following fra-
ternities leading in their respective
leagues: Tau Kappa Epsilon, Delta
Alpha Epsilon, Accacia, Alpha Sigma
Phi, 'Kappa Nu, Theta Chi, Phi Lamb-
da Kappa, Phi Chi, Alpha Delta Phi,
and Sigma Alpha Mu.

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YELL LEADER CANDIDATES
TO MEET AT FIELD HOUSE
All candidates for the Varsity
cheer leading squad are request-
ed to report to Willisam Warrick
at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
Yost field house.

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Careless investors are the pause of losses tIat amount

to millions of dollars each year.

This can be greatly 1es-

sened by more careful selection.
You are taking a personal risk unless you make an
intelligent investigation into the character of securities. There
are a great many fake investment schemes that have little if

I

I NVESTI GATE

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3

any chance of turning out successfully.

You cannot afford

to be trapped into buying until you make certain that it is

Announcing

reliable.

The fall display of
Tom Powers & Co.,
Merchant Tailors,
Chicago.
With a large line of
foreign and domestic
woolens to be tailored
to measure.
Oct. 19-20-21

$

Perhaps in our experience of investing

other people's

money we have gained information that would be valuable

A large shipment of the
desired shades in brown
. ..
suits just received from
Langrock.

to you. If so, we
benefit of it. Feel

welcome the opportunity to give you the

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free to ask our advice.

It,

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