100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

$

ESTABLISHED
1890

Si r

4:3 atl

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 18

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1926

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENT'S

GREE 0HSSPUBLICAN CLUB
ON PARTY SYSTEM

FRIEDA HEMPEL TO APPEAR ON CHORAL
UNION PROGRAM AT HILL AUDITORIUM

EMPH AS[ZE S IAPORTANCE
TWO FACTIONS BEFORE
STUDENT GROUP

OF

URGES USE OF VOTE
Nominee Tells Audience To Be Active
In Political Organizations And
To Stand For Principles
Stressing the importance of politi-
cal parties as an essential element of
American democracy, Fred W. Green,
'98L, spoke yesterday at a luncheon
at the Union under the auspices of
the Republican club. He urged stu-
dents to become active in some party,
and to stand consistently on principles.
"There is a wonderful opportunity
for young men to serve their country
in political organizations," Mr. Green
stated. "In times of stress such as
IGREEN FAVORS BILDING
PROGRAM AF UNIVERSITY
"There will always be a build
Ing program at the University,
said Republican gubernatorial
nominee Fred W. Green, '98L,
after his speech yesterday, and
II shall always be in favor of pro-
viding means to extend it to
meet the needs of the institution.
We cannot have satisfactory edu-
cation without the proper physi-
cal equipment."
war, it is easy to be patriotic and sup-~
port one's flag, but in peacetime the
nation is not generally appreciated.
It is necessary to live for one's coun-
try in peace as well as in war," he
said.
Some people believe that they can
stay out of political parties, but, ac-
cording to Mr. Green, it is almost im-
possible to accomplish anything in
that way. The individual is not
strong enough to achieve much with-
out the strength of some organization.
The gubernatorial nominee pointed
out that the students of today will be
the rulers of tomorrow, and that the
present governing generation would
like to improve conditions as much as
possible before turning the control
over to younger hands. In order for
men to accomplish worthwhile ends.
in Mr. Green's opinion, they must be
men of strong character and fixed
principles. Their efforts must not be
for the sake of getting votes, but to
support their abiding principles.
One may disagree with certain fea-
tures of his party, but he should try
to improve it from within, rather than
withdrawing from the organization,
Mr. Green asserted. Where principles
are involved, he explained, it is not
matter of politics but of one's own
self-respect.
Emphasizes Fundamentals
The fundamental nature of the two
party system in this country was em-
phasized by Mr. Green, who contrast-
ed it with the "chaos in Europe," the
numerous conflicting and confusing
parties in France, and the rise of
several dictatorships to replace many
party systems which had failed.
In regard to a statement by Dean
Henry M. Bates of the Law school
that only 50 per cent of the people in
the country vote, Mr. Green said that
no suchh assertion could be made if
people would appreciate their govern-
ment more fully. They must vote, he
said. "It is easy, just to make a note
of appreciation to the government."
Dan Bates introduced the speaker
at the meeting, of which Dean Hugh
Cabot of the Medical school was the
toastmaster. The session was attend-
ed by Mrs. Green, Congressman Earl
C. Michener of Adrian, and Judge Ira
W. Jayne of Detroit.
WISCONSIN SQUAD
HELD 'SCORELESS
BY PURDUE TEAM
(By Associated Press)
LAFAYETTE, Ind., Oct. 16.-Pur-

due and Wisconsin swept up and down
Ross-Ade stadium this afternoon in a
game notable for its lack of scoring
opportunities and battled to a score-
less tie. Harmon, Wisconsin star, was
pitted against the driving tactics of
"Cotton" Wilcox, Purdue half back
with honors about even, though the
latter gained consistently through the
Wisconsin line late in the game.
Each team had one chance to scor
and both elected to attempt field goals
Leitl' kick for Wisconsin was wide

As the opening number of the forty-
eight annual Choral Union Concert
series, Frieda Hempel, operatic so-
prano, will appear at 8:00 o'clock to-
morrow night in Hill auditorium. This
will be the first appearance of Miss
Hempel in America this season, since
she comes directly from her vacation
in Bavaria, having set her sailing date
two weeks earlier in order to arrive in
this country in tine for this concert.
The singer has had a long career in
operatic work, making her debut in
the Royal Opera house in Berlin in
1905. Soon after, she toured Europe
and came to America in 1912, making
her debut in the 'Metropolitan Opera
house, where she received much com-
mendation from critics for her re-
markable voice.
Miss Hempel has appeared several
times before in this city but never be-
fore on the Choral Union series..
Ewald Haun, flutist, will assist her
in some of her numbers and Rudolph
Gruen, pianist, will also accompany

her. The complete program is as fol-
lows:
Rondo Capriecioso ......Mendelssohn
Mr. Gruen
(a) My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair,
...........................Haydn
(b) ARIA from the "Marriage Canta-
ta".............. . .. Bach
Miss Hempel
Theme and Variations.......Proch
Miss Hempel
(a) Prelude in G Minor......Gruen
(b) Prelude in B Flat Minor ..Chopin
Mr. Gruen

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)

Ave Maria ............ Schubert
Der Schmied ........ Schumann
Feldeinsamkeit ........ Brahms
Dort in den Weiden .....Brahms
I Have a Lover True .......Wolff
Miss Hempel

Spirale .................... Donjon
Mr. Haun
Folk songs:
(a) Schwesterlein........ German
(b) Gsaetzli................Swiss
(c) Coucou, Canari Jaloux..Neuchatel
(d) Lauterbach.............Alsatian
Miss Hempel

DELAWRE SENATOR
ATTACKS COOLIDGE

In

President Is Charged By Bayard,
Radio Address, With Political
Man-uverIng

BUTLER IS MENTIONED
(By Associated, Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 16.-President
Coolidge was accused of "shaking
down" his visitors for a third term
endorsement during his summer stay
at the White House in a radio address
"here tonight by Senator Bayard of
Delaware, treasurer of the Democratic
senatorial campaign committee..
"From day to day," the senator said,
"one or more of the great minds of1
the Republican party were ushered
into his presence. Thereafter the
"great minds," hat in hand, came out1
into the sunlight and announced to
the assembled representatives of the1
press that there was not a cloud on
the Republican horizon, that pros-
perity was 'ehetratng into every nook
and cranny, that these blessings oughtj
to be laid at the door of Republican
policies and that credit for promulga-
tion of said policies was due to the
President."
Senator Bayard said that Senator
Butler of Massachusetts, the Repub-
lican national chairman, had found
the textile industry of his state rather
"flat," when he sang his song of.pros-
perity, and that Senator Phipps of
Colorado, chairman of the Republican
senatorial committee, in singing of
prosperity, had met distressing notes
of agriculture from the West.
PARIS AUTHOR
WILL LECTURE
ON MORALIT Y
Lucien Levy-Bruhl, professor of his-
tory of modern philosophy at the Sor-
bonne, in Paris, will deliver a lecture
on primitive mentality at 4:15 o'clock,
Oct.19, in the Natural Science audi-
torium.
Professor Levy-Bruhl is the author
of many books upon philosophy and
the history of philosophy. Among these
books are his "Modern Philosophy in
France," "La Morale et la Science des
Moeurs," and "Les Fonctions Mentales
dans les Societies inferieures." The
lecture that he is giving here is a re-
view of the material that he delivered
as Exchange professor at Harvard
I since published under the title "Prim-
itive Mentality."
Shortly following this lecture will
be one by Prof. S. N. Dasgupta, pro-
fessor of philosophy in Presidency
college, Calcutta, on the subject "Edu-
cation and International Relations."
Princeton Loses
To Navy, 27 To 13
(By Associated Press)
PRINCETON, N.aJ., Oct. 16.- The
Navy invaded the Princeton Tiger's
Idomain today and headed southward in
the late evening with a 27 to 13 vic-
tory over the Orange and Black.
The Annapolis eleven smashed the
Princeton forward wall to bits in three
periods of a royal battle. It was Full.
back Schuber and Howard Caldwell
f who accounted for the striped players
, downfall. Except for one flash late
in the second period when Prince
e ton's aerial attack netted a pair o
touchdowns, the Blue had the bette
e of the argument. Earl Baruch, Prince
. ton halfback, playing in place of Jak
e SRlagel. engraved his name in th

MARINES CALLED
TOGUARDOMAILS
Numerous Holdups of Recent Months
Necessitate Extreme Measures
By Executive
RUSH ACTION ORDERED
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 16.-The ma-
rines again have been called into ac-
tion as they were in' 1921 to guard
from bandits the millions of dollars
worth of valuable mail handled daily
by the postal service.1
Stirred by the numerous holdups
within the last few months, especially
by that at Elizabeth, New Jersey, when
a mail truck was robbed of $151,000,
President Coolidge and his cabinet
have decided on extreme measures.
Postmaster-General New arranged
today at a conference with Major Gen-
eral Lejune, commandant of the ma-
pine corps, for immediate assignment
of marines to railway terminals, on
mail cars and mail trucks which trans-
port large quantities of valuable mail.
The number of men to take up the
work was not announced, but in 1921,
when a similar emergency existed,
2500 men were placed on guard.
Plans for the organization within
the postal service itself of a large
armed force immediately was begun
by the Postmaster-General and as soon
as this force has been trained thor-
oughly, the marines will be released.
'Additional armored railway mail cars
will be built by the government upon
specifications designed to protect the
mail and postal employees from band-
its' attacks. These will be leased to
the railroads. Armored mail trucks
are employed in many cities but the
number of these have been insufficient
and orders have gone out for the
building of more.
Northwestern Wins
Over Indiana In
Last Period, 20 To 0
(By Associated Press)
EVANSTON, Oct. 16.-For three
quarters today Indiana university
matched with smart defense the strong
attack of Northwestern, but in the
fourth period, the Hoosier wall crum-
bled and the Wildcats romped to a
three touchdown victory, winning 20
to 0.
Captain "Moon" Baker, "Tiny"
Lewis, Gustafson and Colin, made up
the backfield which enabled North-
western to hit its stride. Gustafson
took Baker's pass for the first marker
in the opening minutes of the final
period. Baker went over soon after
the next kickoff, when runs by Lewis
and Colin put the ball on the Hoosier
one yard line, and Lewis found a
hole in the Indiana line for a 50 yard
sprint to the final touchdown. Baker
kicked the extra point after the las
two touchdowns.
Ohio State Trims
Columbia, 32 To
(By Associated Press)
1 NEW YORK, Oct. 16.-Ohio State
defeated Columbia 32 to 7 here today
Fred Grim scored three touchdown
- for the Buckeyes, two of them bein
f after long runs. The other was a re
r sult of a slant off tackle in th
shadow of the Columbia goal posts
e Grim's performance of running 5
e 1vards for a touchdown in the secom

CHICGO (MINISTER
Will GIVE SECOND
ADDRESS OF SERIES'
UNIVERSITY CONVO CA TION WILL
HEAR FORMER ANN ARBOR
CLERGYMAN
OTTO KOCHTO SING
Patton, Member of Faculty at Chicago
Theological Seminary, WIl Speak
On "What's In It For Mel"
Dr. Carl Safford Patton of the Chi-
cago Theological seminary, former Ann
Arbor clergyman, will be the speaker
at the second Sunday convocation at
11 o'clock this morning in Hill audi-
torium. The service is one of the
second series which is being held un-
der the auspices of the Student coun-
cil, Women's league, and School of
Religion.
A graduate of Oberlin college in
1888, and four years later from And-
over Theological seminary, Dr. Pat-
ton, after being ordained in that year,
went to Auburn, Me., where he preach-
ed in the Congregational church for
nine years. In 1901, he became pastor
of the First Congregational church in
this city where he was located for ten
years. During this time he received
his D. D. degree from Oberlin and, in
1913, his Ph. D. degree from the Uni-
versity.
In 1911 Dr. Patton went to Colum-
'bus, where he became pastor of the
First Congregational church, succeed-
ing Dr. Washington Gladder. He re-
mnained there until 1917 when he mov-
ed to Los Angeles, where he held a
similar position until this year. He
has recently become affiliated with
the faculty of the Chicago Theological
seminary, and was the convention
speaker at the last nation Congrega-
tional convention.
Dr. Patton has lectured in various
'parts of the country and has written
a number of books and articles on re-
ligious subjects. He is the author of
"Truth in Small Packages", "Sources
of Synoptic Gospels", "The New The-
ism", "Sources of the Gospel of
Mark", and "Preachableness of the
New Testament."
Dr. Patton has many friends among
the University faculty and townspeo-
ple in Ann Arbor. He is the guest
'of Shirley Smith, secretary of the Uni-
versity, during his visit here.
Thomas Cavanaugh', '27L, president
of the Student council, will preside
at the convocation this morning. Otto
Koch, '27, S. of M., is the soloist, and
Dalies Frantz will be at the organ.
The program follows:
Organ Prelude-"Kamennoi-Ost-
row", Rubenstein.
Mr. Frantz
Hymn--"How Firm A Foundation."
Congregation
Prayer-Dr. Carl S. Patton.
Offertory Solo-"I Will Lift Up
Thine Eyes," Eville.
Mr. Koch
Address-"What's In It For Me?"
Dr. Patton
Benediction-Dr. Patton.
Organ Postlude--"Marche Ro-
maine," Gounod.
Mr. Frantz
SCIENCE COURSE
ADDS NEW MEN
Excessive Enrollment In Psychology
DeptartmentForces Addition
Due to the fact that more than 1,000
sophomores enrolled for the elemen-
tary physcology course planned to ac-

commodate only 500 students, two new
men have been added to the depart-
ment, and new restrictions placed on
r the course for this semester.
SThe ne men that have been added
r are Theodore C. Schneirla, enrolled
in the graduate school here last year
and manager of the Varsity band, and
rLeon B. Slater, formerly dean of stu-
t dents at the Wichita Municipal college
Wichita, Kansas.
Due to the addition of these two men
the number of people allowed to take
the course was increased somewhat.
7 But the measure necessary to further
reduce the number enrolled was the
elimination of sophomores of the li-
terary college.
The growth of the course is due,
. according to a member of the depart-
s ment, to the increased interest in
g psychological findings and the increas-
- ed publicity given results of such
e study.
5 CHAMBERSBURG, Pa.-Mrs. Cal-
d Ivin Coolidge, wife of the President

WHITESIDE WILL APPEAR
AT WHITNEY TOMORROW

BIG TEN STANDING

Walker Whiteside
Noted actor who will return o Ann
Arbor tomorrow night in "The Arab-
ian," a play written by Gordon Kean,
author of "The Hindu," another one
of Mr. Whiteside's starring vehicles.
He will be supported by a noted cast,
including Miss Sydney Shields.
ILLINI DEFEAT IOWA
IN THRILING GAME,
Zuppke's New Backfield Shows Great
Power In Overcoming Driving
Attack of Hawkeyes
'COWBOY' KUTSCH STARS
(By Associated Press)
CAMPAIGN, Ill., Oct. 16.-Revealing
a galaxy of backfield stars, to operate
behind the veteran .line, that shielded
"Red" Grange last season, Illinois
passed and kicked its way to a 13 to
6 victory over Iowa ,today, before a
home coming crowd of 50,000 in Illi-
nois' Memorial stadium.
The Illini were forced to exert the.
combined efforts of their new back-
field quartet to match the brilliancy
of "Nick" Kutsch, the rough riding
Iowa cowboy. Kutsch scored one
touchdown and came within two
inches of crashing over with a sec-
ond that might have tied the score. 1
Kutsch, playing left halfback, gained
two thirds of the total yardage, car-
rying the ball 160 yards in 27 at-
tempts.
Kutsch gave the Illinois rooters a
shock at the very start of the game
when, on the second play after the
kickoff, he raced 60 yards around the
Illinois' left end for a touchdown.
Then, early in the third period, Kut-
sch broke away for a 15 yard run
and, with the assistance of Schmidt,
the big fullback, pounded the ball to
the Illinois four yard line.
Kutsch then shot around left end
and was heading for the Illinois goal,
certain to make a touchdown, when
Daugherity upset him when he was
only two inches from the line.
Kutsch's touchdown demoralized the
Illini for a few minutes, but the new
backfield, "Frosty" Peters, Stewart,
Lanum, and Daugherity, immediately
began the uphill fight.
Peters, husky quarterback, became
the new idol of Illinois fans, as the re-
sult of his kicking and brilliant run-
ning. He scored two field goals, the
first from the 16 yard line, and the-
other from the 33 yard mark. He fail-
ed on a third attempt from the 38
yard line. He also reeled off some
spectacular runs. Lanum opened the
second period with an exhibition of
forward passing, two of which placed
Illinois within scoring range. This
enabled Peters to kick an easy field
goal. Lanum then hurled one to
U Daugherity that enabled him to run
U 27 yards for Illinois' touchdown.
r Cuhel, the Iowa track star, went in
I the fourth quarter and Iowa made a
desperate attempt to tie the score
CORNELL STAGES
e WIN OVER M.S.C

Games played
MICHIGAN .... 1
Illinois.. .......1
Northwestern .. 1
Wisconsin... . . 1
Purdue ..........1
Indiana .. .......1
Minnesota.... . 1
Iowa .. .........1
Chicago.........0
Ohio State ...... 0

MICHIGAN GAINS FIRST BIG TEN
VITR YDLNIGNORTHMEN WITH VARIED ATTACK

W
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Gridiron Enthusiasts)
End Auspicious Day
In Revelry At Union
The "sound of revelry" last night
at the Union was a composite of many
things; revelry accompanied by banjo
throbbing, clarinet wailing, and the
measured, sh-sh of as many dancing
couples as have gathered together in
the ball room in a long time.
It presented a fairly good picture
representing the enjoyable climax of
a highly successful afternoon. And
it took place in a decorative profusion
of maize and blue, maroon and gold,
and a colorful galaxy of college ban-
ners and pennants that lacked only
those of Nevada State normal and
Oskosh Agricultural college to be al-
most complete. Then there were foot-
balls in a suspended collection that
made it look distinctly as though a
raid had taken place on the trophy
cases of the Field house. At one end
of the ball room was placed a 'replica
of the "Little Brown Jug." The spot-
light radiance around the cherished
object of tradition indicated the pleas-
ing result of today's score added to
those of other years.
Somewhere toward the waning of
festivities the group of string and
wind experts did a disappearing act,
and 10 and behold, on their reentry
they were clad in all the glorious re-
galia of this institution's Varsity foot-
ball team. Then followed a parade
and a rendering of "The Victors"
equalled in execution and enthusiastic
reception only by our regular Varsity
drum and fife corps.
Sapiro To Address
B nai B'rith Hillel
At Lane Hall Today
Aaron Sapiro, prominent corpora-
tion attorney, will speak at the regu-
lar Jewish services in Lane Hall at
4 o'clock today. Mr. Sapiro's presence
has been securedthrough the efforts
of the B'nai B'rith Hilel Foundation.
The attorney was born in San Fran-
cisco in 1885, of poor Jewish parent-
age and most of his. early life was
Sspent in an orphan asylum. He stud-
ied at Cincinnati to become a Rabbi
but changed his mind after nearly
completing his course andareturned to
San Francisco to study law.
Mr. Sapiro is at present attorney
for more than half a million farmers
of the United States through the
agency of the many cooperative mar-
keting organizations that he has
founded and is conducting. Among
these are the famous California Fruit
Growers association, the Southern
Cotton Growers' marketing association
and many others of equal fame.
OTHER FOOTBALL SCORES
WEST
Cornell 24, Michgan State 14.
Ohio State 32, Columbia 7.
Illinois 13, Iowa 6.
Purdue 0, Wisconsin 0.
Pennsylvania 27, Chicago 0.
Northwestern 20, Indiana 0.
Notre Dame 28, Penn State 0.
Nebraska 20, Washington univer
city 6.
Missouri 7, Southern Methodist 7.
. Loyola 38, Detroit 0.

L
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0

Pct.
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000

GILBERI MAKES 42 YARD RUN
FOR FINAL TOUCHDOWN
OF GAME
WOLVERINE LINE FALTERS
Contest Featured By Battle Between
Joesting, Molenda For Supremacy
In Line Smashing
By Wilton A. Sinpson
Michigan hurdled the first obstacle
in the race for the Western Conference
football championship by defeating
the powerful line plunging eleven of
the University of Minnesota by a score
of 20 to 0 before a capacity crowd
yesterday afternoon at Ferry field.
Although Michigan was unable to
effect its strong forward pass attack
with its customary success, the Wol-
verines combined a running and line
plunging game and snared enough
passes to score all their points during
the first half. The Yost eleven made
great progress in developing its for-
ward pass defense, which showed so
poorly against the Michigan State
team last week, by covering 13 of the
northerners' passes, allowing only one
of these to be completed. Yost's
great line which held its opponents
to a 3 point score throughout last sea-
son was only a ghost in yesterday's
battle. Michigan's line coped with
the Minnesota shift during the first
two periods, but cracked under a
powerful line plunging attack in the
last half of the game.
Being completely outplayed during
the first half, Minnesota returned to
the field in the third quarter with re-
newed energy and amazed the entire
Michigan team with a sensational
march down the field on a series of
line plunges by Almquist and Joest-
ing, star fullbacks of the Gopher team.
Early -in the final period the North-
erners brought the ball to within 16
yards of the Michigan goal line, only
to lose the ball on downs after they
had been unsuccessful in a series of
forward passes.
Yesterday's contest was. a battle be-
tween Molenda and Joesting for all-
Conference honors. Both men were
ranked as the' best fullbacks in the
Big Ten last season and this year they
will be given an opportunity to de-
termine the supremacy' in two games.
Both stars made splendid showings
for their teams, but Molenda was forc-
ed to withdraw from the fray early
in the game because of injuries, re-
suming his place at the start of the
second half after receiving medical
aid.

The game opened with both teams
playing very cautiously, punting fre-
quently to keep out of danger. The
Wolverines were given their first op-
portunity to score when Gilbert re-
turned Barnhart's punt from midfield
to Minnesota's 33 yard line. Rich
threw a long forward pass to Fried-
man, who ran to the 5 yard line .be-
fore being tackled out of bounds.
Molenda, carrying the ball on three
successi've plays, plunged through the
center of the line.for the first touch-
down of the game. Friedman's at-
tempt to kick goal was successful.
Flora'paved -the way for the Wol
verine's second score when he broke
through the line and blocked Ny-
dahl's punt, Michigan recovering the
ball on the Gopher's 7 yard line. On
'a line plunge, Weber advanced the
ball to the 2 yard line. After the
Gophers had stopped Weber without
gain on his second attempt to cross
the goal line, Friedman selected Rich
to carry the ball. Rich found a hole
in. the center of the line and fell over
the goal for the second score. Fried-
man kicked the ball squarely between
the bars for the point after touchdown,
but the referee disregarded the point
because Michigan was offside on the
play.
The Wolverines obtained possession
of the ball in the Gophers' territory
when Barnhart punted to Gilbert on
the Minnesota 41 yard line. Gilbert,
outdistanced his interference on the
next play, and made a wide end run
around the left side of the line and
parted through the entire Minnesota
team for a touchdown, covering 42
yards in his sensational run. Fried-
man added the extra point after the
touchdown.

r (By Associated Press)
ITHACA, N. Y., Oct. 16.--Micnigan
- State threw a bad scare into Cornell
today but the Red and White emerged
victorious on the long end of a 24
- to 14 score.
After Cornell got the jump on the
- Westerners by rushing two touch-
downs in the first period, Michigan
State came back fighting and held
Cornell scoreless in the second period
- and nearly won a spectacular contest'
, in the final period.

EAST
Harvard 27, William and Mary.
Brown 27, Bates 14.
Pittsburgh 19, Colgate 16.
Yale 14, Dartmouth 7.
West Virginia 13, Georgetown 10.
Lafayette 14, Dickinson 13.
NEW YORK.--Word was received
here today of the death in Paris 01
Cleveland Moffett, author an journal-
ist. Mr. Moffett's wife, a son and
daughter were with him.

I
fI

THE LINEUP
MINNESOTA MICHIGAN
Haycraft ........LE.... Oosterbaan
Hyde ...........LT........... Baer
Hanson .........LG...... Palmeroli
'Hulstrand.......C...... Truskowski
Strand .........RG..........Lovette
Gary ........... T.......... Gabel
lWheeler (Capt). .RE.. ........Flora
Nydahl..........QB.. Friedman (C)
Matchan........LH....... ..Gilbert

i

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan