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September 28, 1926 - Image 13

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-09-28

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0

,TUESDAY,, SPTEMER'2, 1926.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P~AGE3THRTE

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FOOTBAL PLAE R S
atOnly One Of 6 Football Candidates
a Declared Ineligible On Account
Of Scholarship Average
ONE RECEIVES ALL A'S
Candidates for the 1926 Wolverine
ts eleven, during the spring semester,
IRsUaccumulated 71 hours of A grade and
282 hours of B out of 914 hours
,Sarried, while only 10 hours of E
s irade'and 63 of D marred the general
I average.
Of the 63 aspirants for the team only
one, Carl Thisted, reserve center last
year and probably one of the most
"~ 4ualified men to take captain Brown's
position at the pivot berth, was de-
Wligjtilared ineligible for competition this
'e> eisemester.
One of the gridmen, Norman Gabel,
',pi.eserve tackle, obtained a perfect
:tzjwrecord in scholarship, receiving 12
!: hours of A grade.
tx Howard Jackson, sophomore half-
oAth back, scored 38 honor points for 15
;iaUahours of credit, and William Hough,
another sophomore back, made 40
onor sponts and 16 hours of credit
.This pair was followed by Peter
Bugni, sophomore end, who gained
2 pointe by virtue of his five hours of
, six of B, and five of C grade.
Paul Cook, a backfield man, made
a straight B average in 14 hours of
work while many others received A
grades in at least one of their courses.
Among this latter group were Wayne
Cowell, fullback, and the Weber
brothers, all of whom received five
hours of A grade.
Following these came Philip Ham-
mes, tackle, Frank Harrigan, end,
James Miller, halfbacks, with three
hours of A grade each. Those re-
ceiving one and two hours of A in-
clude Leroy Heston, end, Ray Cragin,
center, Sidney 'Dewey, tackle, and
George .,quiel: William Puckelwart7,
Herman Nyland, and Harold Green-
wald, backfield men.
Others who ' madencreditable show-
gs* were Asbeck, tackle or end,
I ~oden, end,, Dahlem, quarter or half,
aptain Friedman, Gilbert, veteran
alf, Grinnell, reserve end, Hager,
ckle, Hughes, full or half, Leason,
center, Lovette, vteran guard, M-
Intyre, ,guard, Nicholson, guard or
tackle, Oosterbaan, all-American end.
Rich, 14alt, Sauer, half, and Schoen-
feld, center.
In order to popularize English
style rugby football in Canada, the
Australian-New Zealand rugby union
is willing to send a picked team to
tour Canada next summer.
NEW YORK-The Intercollegiate
Ace orchestra, composed of men from
Princeton, Y.le and Dartmuth, ha
returned from i Three months sojourn
in s Europe.
W I
I rug ,Store!
r /
340 S. State St. .
for
F TE
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SFOUNTAIN PENS

I-
PENCILS
STATIONERY
RAZORS -
SHAVING BRUSHES
TOOTH BRUSHES
Si
SHAVING CREAMS
TOOTH PASTES
S_
TOWELS\
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R UH-
=,IHAIR BRUSHES

Wolverine Leader

Athletes igh Scholastically, Figures
Also Carry Larger Number Of Credit Next to the track division came the low the general average of the Uni- this in spite of the low average of the group ofn
Hours And Remain In School
Sorne Than Otherscho minor sports group with a mark of versity, which is set at 73.4 by official j basketball numeral men who fell to a latter groa
onger an rs 75.9, almost four points less than the figures. Varsity football men rank fraction above 73 per cent, group ofs
-i la wf11"hve the averaffe with a girade Varsity men obtained a total aver- better than

Show
non-athletes. Moreover the
up was not only an average
students but even a trifle
a the general averaze of the

USE 1,300 IN TESTS

l

Scholastic work- of the average ath-I
lete at the University of Michigan is!
superior to that of the average non- !
athlete, according to statistics com-
piled by West Joseph Altenburg, as-
sistant instructor in physical educa-
tion at the University.
A study of the figures also show
that the athletes carried a larger
number of credit hours than an equal
group of non-athletes picked at ran-
dom, and that there is no appreciable
difference in the choice of subjects
chosen, and finally, that a larger per-
centage of the first group remained in
college for a longer period of time
than the selected non-athletes.
Includes 1,:300 Students
More than 1,300 students were in-
cluded in the tests, the final result
showing that the athletes outranked
the non-athletes with a percentage of
74.5 to 73.5.
The results were computed in the
following way: to equal the total
number of athletes, other students
were chosen from the various col-
leges of the University, 420 from the
literary college, 175 from the Colleges
of Engineering and Architecture, and
75 from the School of Education. Then
the total number of hours and honor
points were taken for the two oppos-
ing groups, giving the result already
stated.
Moreover, the figures seem to in-
dicate that the better athletes out-
rank the numeral men and those who
received the A. M. A. insignia. Var-
sity men averaged 76.5, A. M. A. men
averaged 75.6, and numeral winners
averaged 73.
Track Men Lead
Perhaps the best record in many
years was made by the Varsity track
men, who under the leadership of'
captain Richard Freyburg, himself a
Phi Beta Kappa, gained a grand av- I
erage of 80.4 or better than a straight
B average. However, the numeral
trackmen had the comparatively low
grade of 71.6, almost six points lower
than that of the A. M. A. men, thus
reducing the total average to 79.8 perI
cent.

leaders. In this group also, the Var-
sity men led the remainder, being
almost a point in the lead of the
A. M. A. men and those receiving num-
erals. The latter two groups had the
percentage of 75.7, making the total
average of the minor sports group
75.9.
Football men, with a mark of 73.1,
are the only athletic men to fall be-

Wl UOUC Ule II gIVfl6", WILIaM
of 74.5. However, the baseball play-j
ers attained a mark of 73.5, exactly
equalling the average of the selected1
non-athletes and exceeding that of all
men on campus.
Basketball Averages
Basketball concludes the survey and
shows that these men also surpassed
the non-athletes by a considerable

age of 76.5 for the first five sports
while numeral men received the low-
est ranking, 73 per cent, partially be-
cause of the poor showing of those
gaining the baseball numerals who
averaged only 71.2 per cent.
From these figures it is shown that
the total of hours and honor points
amassed by the athletes was superior

University as shown by their percent-
age of 73.5 as opposed to the Univer-
sity average of 73.4 per cent.
LINCOLN, Neb.-Glenn Munn is the
fourth Munn brother to try for a posi-
tion on football teams at the Univer-
sity of Nebraska. He entered tho
university this fall and will be a can-
didate for the freshman team.

margin by gaining a grude of 75.6, and to that accumulated by the selected

I:min

Men

of

m ichi1gani

t

Capt. Friedman
Benny Friedman, of Cleveland, will
captain the 26th Yost-coached Michi-I
gan football team. During the past
two years Friedman has been one of
the outstanding quarterback of the
country, being selected for a position
on the all-Conference football team
and chosen by many football critics as1
all-American material.
SALEM, N.. H.-Fredericks of Den-
ver, Colo., claimed a new cycle record
when he drove a motorcycle at an
average speed of 114 2-10 miles an
hour for five miles in the United
States motorcycle championships re-J
cently.
ESCANABA-More than 70,000 cars
this year passed from lower Michigan
to the upper peninsula, closing the
most successful summer tourist sea-
son this section has ever known.

Invitation

C--
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We welcome you back to Ann Arbor.

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A new name, but the
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A new n me, but the
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Successors to N. F. Allen Co.
A store where you willike to trade.

<;

Brunswick's New Musical Instrument is
THE IDEAL FRATERNITY PHONOGRAPH
Usually, we can find sufficient words to advertise the merchandise which
we are selling, but words absolutely fail us in describing the wonderful new
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We are also carrying in stock the Bruns-
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This wonderful instrument of ited vol-
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Let us explain our plan of loaning the Pan-

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1111

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