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October 14, 1926 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-14

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P'AGE FIOUA

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TIHUJ ยง ATI o'CTOtER 14, 1926

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members . of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated PAs is exclusively en-
title to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00,.,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street. ,
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor............. W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor...............Irwin A. Olian
News Edtor.. ... , , Frederick Shihlito
News Editors.............Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor..... ..........Marion Kubik
Sports Editor ............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Edit~or............:Morris Z werdlifl;
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymer Ellis Merry
Carlton Chanmpe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland.C. Smith
Janies Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
oouvlas IDoubleday . Carl Burger
Assistants
Marion Anderson Dorothy Morehouse
Alex Buchnowski Kingsley Moore
Jean Catxpbell .lenry Marymont
Martin J.'Cohn Adeline O'Brien
Windsor Davies 'Kenneth Patrick
Clarence. Edelson Morris Quinn
William.Emery Sylvia Stone
John Friend James Sheehan
Robert Gessner Henry Thurnau
Elaine Gruber William Thurnau
1ilorton iiB. IcoVc Milford Vanik
1'aul Kern Herbert Vedder
1 i lt 'n Kirrhbdum Al arian Welles
rin i aiowe Thaddeus Wasielewski
i Levy Sherwood Winslow
3 . h , tas'M ci~cai'-Thiotas Winter

present bill was to reduce generally
the high surtaxes on corporate in-
comes. This it has accomplished and
business has been greatly stimulated
as a result.
As is often the case, it is the min-
ority who are clamoring for a reduc-
tion. But such would only serve to
disrupt the present system in several
respects, benefiting few and hurting
many. The present surplus in the
Treasury could well be applied to the
public debt, as urged by Secretary
Mellon. The time is not ripe for a
tax cut, there will be plenty of time
to consider a reduction when the
present ,bill has had a fair trial. So
far it has been a noteworthy success.
Why change it now?
The fascist party has adopted a
new set of mules whereby all party
officials are appointed by the general
secretary, namely Mussolini, which
simply means that Benito will have to
arrange for a few more mirfors in
order to secure a full attendance when
the party meets. "

OATED ROLL
MEIC
5 AND
MINING
Co-education is on the carpet again
in the Campus Opinion column. But
before we get into a long and hot
fight over this matter, ladies and gen-
tlemen, let us agree, if the thing is
wrong, on which sex is to leave the
University?
" * "
Obviously, the men have the better
rights here; they were here first, and
they own a Union Building, whereas
the women merely wish they had a
League building.
Of course, if this separation has to
come about, the logical thing to do
would be to send all the girls to Ypsi,
and then build a wider highway be-
tween the two towns.
* * *
That most professors really don't
believe in co-education is seen by
their practice of separating the sexes
in the class room.

IMUSIC'
AND
DRMA
TONIGHT: The Ann Arbor group
of Michigan women present Elsie
Janis in a recital in Hill auditorium
at 8 o'clock.

Friday and aturday Special
$2.25 Laundry Case
r=
$1.48
with 1 extra inside U
G R 694HA./f5 At Both Ends of the biagoital

* * *
THE ORGAN RECITAL
A Review, by Malverna Kennedy
Appreciation of a quiet hour

of

|

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

1USINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
''USINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED. JR.
........ Paul W. Arnold
er :'.eising ..............William C. Pusch
rti tiig...............Thomas Sunderland
'0 -isng........... George H. Annable, Jr.
wa ti in...............T. Kenneth Haven
1 iaon.............John H. Bobrink
its .......Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
1: j r. T.1T Greil Jr.
ix :'. ; d ~n A. "M. lin idey
M. tI( iiE. L. Hulse
S. Kerbaury
r. _ er R. A. Meyer
IM am 1H1V. osenhium
rrHURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1926
Night Editor-JAMES T. HERALD

WATCHFULL WAITiNG
In suggesting an armistice between
the warring Chinese factions and in
providing for the protection of Amer-
Wn Citizens with as little commotion
rsphle, the state department is
4I ir' 1utmost to assist in a settle-
z; nf th muddled conditions which
atm iaw very obvious in China.
m; made this humane move,
Sr, the United States has gone
as far a it rightly may. Formation
ci a dl'nite policy or working pro-
n toiard this Oriental country is
p,,,cctia~ly impossible because of the
n; it dources of reliable informa-
ci oncnerning its complicated af-
!i. and because the conflict there
s primarily civil war. By reason of
this latter condition, the opposing
armies cannot be regarded as belli-
gerents, and peace proposals may only
he advancnd from this country through
its consuls'.
l .' in the situation, Secre-
tar .f Sate Kellogg has admitted
0;c r vof tcurate and complete
rl has wisely indicated that
h nr-sent policy would be one of
athful waiting. Inasmuch as this
^att tude places grave responsibility
upon the American legation in China,
this country is fortuhate in having as
its chief representative such a man
as John V. A. McMurray. This foreign
minister has long been familiar with
Oriental conditions as secretary of the
Chinese legation, as chief of the divi-
sion of the state department on Far
Eastern affairs, and in various other
capacities. Consequently, even though
the state department may be unable
to make its influence felt in the normal
way because of the impotency of the
Pekin government, it will be effective-
ly represented in its adopted policy.
UNJUSTIFIED BY FACTS
Ta1kin no heed of the repeated as-
sertions by Treasury officials that theS
time is not ripe for tax reductions,
various trade associations are gather-
ing'their forces for a concentrated
drive on immediate tax cuts in cor-
poratioh earnings. Although the
present tax bill has had but a few
months' trial these associations would
make a slashing alteration in it, re-I

A LOGICAL VIEW
To the Editor:
The views of the "Alarmist" are
amusingly adolescent and immaturely
reflective for the one who claims to
be a senior.- The objection to women
in the classroom is puerile and needs'
no comment beyond that of the edi-
torial in today's Daily, but the impli-;
cation against the morals of co-edu-
cational institutions is a challenge
that can not be allowed to pass un-
noticed.
We are told that the presence of
women on the campus introduces the
necessity of immorality. If one were
to compare the men of Dartmouth or
any other men's college of rank, with
those of Michigan, would there be
found any striking dissimilarity in
the morality of the two groups? If
one were to compare the women of
Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Vassar or Sim-
mons with those of Michigan, would
one find any striking dissimilarity in
their morals? Would the "Alarmist"
be responsible for an answer to these
questions? The assumptions he makes
definitely describe Michigan men and
women as guilty of less moral in-
tegrity than the students of segregat-
ed colleges.
Personal experience-limited to be
sure-with men and women of both
types of colleges, has given me no
reason to declame in behalf of the
morals of either type.
Some of the colleges in the East are
so close together that segregation
serves only to separate sexes in the
classroom. The social life is as inti-
mate and intermixed as at any co-
educational institution. For example,
I suggest the cases of Amherst, Smith
and Mt. Holyoke.
Dartmouth is an excellent example
of male isolation. A hundred or more
miles from a women's college, Dart-
mouth men live in splendid social
vacuity for months, with only the
events of the football game, Carnival
parties, the Prom, and week-end
Peerades introducing feminine com-
pany. After the long bleak days of
total abstinence from women (save
for silent trips to White River Junc-
tion) the accumulated sexual energy
is difficult to restrain. I have heard
Dartmouth men lament before return-
ing to Hanover, over the long period
of isolation before Christmas; have
seen them in action during vacations;
and I have some major doubts as to
the supreme moral innocence of the
segregated college man.1
Ifone is burning with the desire
to combat immorality between the
sexes, I would suggest absolute free-
dom of companionship with opportun-
ity for association under all possible
circumstances, and especial emphasis
on free and unrestrained social inter-
course. Under these conditions the
morality of the individual would be a
function of character, somewhat influ-
enced by social forces. The creation
of artificial barriers to a natural im-
pulse-sex-can only create an un-
natural condition of temporary mor-
ality that will eventually be upset.
The contention' that the life of stu-
dents in a segregated college is fuller
than that in an institution like ours
is wholly unwarranted; it is quite
independent of the mixture of the
sexes. It is a function of the intel-
ligence of the individuals who attend

OUR OWN "CAMPUS OPINION" t
Toasted Rolls:
We ;note you're down on the "elder-
ly students," as occupying seats on
the main floor Sunday A. M. at the
convocation. We read your request,
but as one of us is quite deaf, we de-
cided the balcony was a little far off,
especially as we understand that even
for those who have their hearing, it
isn't wise to sit there! Are we for-
given?
-One Elderly; One Not So Elderly.
s* *
Yes, my dear-as Nancy Fairface,
of the advice column-would say, you
are forgiven. Probably the reason
why others didn't sit in the balcony
was that they were blind and didn't
see the notice.
* s
A BETTER HEALTH SERVICE
Dear Timothy-
It certainly is a shame when one
stops to think how the University is
up and doing, its professors becoming
go-getters, the B and G boys raking
up the leaves scientifically, the di-
agonal made more efficient by
straightening it-everything up to the
minute-that the Health service has
fallen down so miserably.
Why not put the Health service on
a business basis? Why not make it
pay; do a volume business so that at
the end of the year they could report
to the Regents that more broken noses
had been set, more noses broken, etc.,
than ever before.
Who will deny that advertising
"specials" has not made modern mer-
chandising what it is? Why couldn't
the Health service put an ad in the
Daily like this as a starter?
FOOTBALL SPECIAL
3 Days Only
Beginning today we will set
broken legs (all sizes) for the
unheard of price of $3.98. . Take
advantage of this rare bargain
now. It may never come again.
Remember-only
$3.98
Many other bargains. False teeth,
(broken lots) 59 cents. Glass eyes
(all colors), 29 cents.
Why not, I ask you?
Black Teak.
* * *
MEDICS WORK TOO MUCH
BULLETIN
Little hope is held by observ-
ers at the mouth of the North
U.mine for the rescue of the 20
Medics entombed there since
Monday. No word has been re-
ceived to indicatedthat the Med-
ics are even as nearly alive as
Iusual.

music on Wednesday afternoons is
growing if we are to judge by the in-
crease in attendance at the Twilight
Organ recital yesterday. Michigan is
fortunate in having Palmer Christian
as university organist; and Michigan
students are fortunate that Mr. Christ-
ian plays for them every week. The
hour of music comes as a breath of
fresh air to a crowded room, as an
opportunity for relaxation at the end
of a hurried day.
- The program yesterday was essen-
tially modern, including Cole, Stouh-
ton, Borowski, Strauss, DeLamarthr
and so on. Dvorak and Bizet were
the only composers included who even
smacked of the old school and they
are essentially of the transition.
Stoughton's "March of the Gnomes"
seemed a little below the par of the
rest of the program but the other
numbers were rendered in the finish-
ed manner that has always character-
ized the University Organist .
Dvorak's Largo from the New
World Symphony was the most com-
plete work of the afternoon. The
haunting melody, reminiscent of negro
spirituals combined with perfect
rhythm and blended into a whole that
was almost orchestral in effect seem-
ed to stand out from the other com-
positions at the beginning of the pro-
gram. Again near the close a "Trau-
merei" by Strauss, transcribed for the
organ by Mr. Christian seemed to fill
the auditorium with its soft beauty.
It was natural, lofty, with no obvious
striving after effect to spoil the ex-
quisite tone flights indicative of air
castles and lovely dreams.
MASQUES
The first play which Masques will
present during the coming season will
be Maurice Maeterlinck's "Sister
Beatrice." This play was the founda-
tion for the plot of "The Miracle" and
will follow in the footsteps of "The
Cradle Song" by Martinez Sierra which
was Masques' opening play of last
year. The director of the Masques
organization for the year will be
Phyllis Loughton, who will also direct
the Junior Girl's Play. Tryouts for
"Sister Beatrice" will probably be
held on Monday afternoon.
"The Cradle Song" as well as "Sis-
ter Beatrice" lends itself to an entire-
ly feminine cast, since the scenes are
laid in a convent almost entirely and
the characters are for the most part
nuns.
AN OPERA OF THE SOUTH
Before the opening of "Deep River"
at the Imperial theater in New York
the chief glamour of the production
was thrown about Lawrence Stallings,
the author of the book, and the pres-
ent vogue of the so-called "new neg-
ro"-with perhaps a minimum of glory
about Arthur Hopkins, the producer.
The appeal seemed to be chiefly to the
dramatic mandarins of theatrical
events. But after the second act of
the opening night Frank Harling as
composer had taken complete charge
of "Deep River" and the rubric "na-
tive opera" seemed particularly ap-
propriate.
And those departments in the New
York papers devoted to music and the
drama were in a dilemma: the musical
emissaries, prepared to enjoy in per-
son and bewail in print, wrote ginger-
ly of drama and, were frankly disap-
pointed in the score; and the theatri-
cal reporters with the scores of a
thousand musical comedies in mind
trod softly on the music. Apparently
those who are sufficiently ignorant
of both music and drama will like
"Deep River."
Whatever the truth may be, however,

Mr. Hopkins should be sincerely com-
mended for his enterprise in choosing
a native theme for embellished treat-
ment in the theater. For the one peren-
nial topic in both music and the opera
is the American indifference to Amer-
ican themes. "Deep River" arranges
several attractive vignettes of creole
and quadroon life in New Orleans
about 1835, with a wisp of story sup-
plying continuity. In an extensive
program note Mr. Hokpins discusses
the social amenities of the creole
"half world of society", the origins of
the cabalistic chants in the second
act, the hostilities between the cre-
oles and Kentuckians, and the voodoo
wnrshin of the native. "Deep River"

SHUBERT LAFAYETTE
Lafayette at Shelby Street
It's Here Again!
"The Big Parade"
A Metro- Gold wyn-Mayer Production

t,

MAKE ~ ~
MANN'S OLEGEItY
Style - Quality - Service
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burned Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
P LEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS{
ON THE1
CAMPUS

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By this time everyone
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gives pen service
not found elsewhere.
Service

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Eastman Films Carried in Stock
340 South State St. Phone 3

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CHORAL UNION CONCERT SERIES

FRiEDa

HEMP

Prima Donna
Ewald Haun
Flautist

Coloratura Soprano of the
Assisted by

Metropolitan

Opera Company

PRl

c
;.1
Gruel
I
'1
i

We made another discovery yester-,
day in regard that mysterious hole
being dug by the steamshovel in the
middle of the proposed extension of
N. University street, in front of the
Health Service. It appears now that
there were 20 senior medic students
buried alive there last Monday after-
noon. These Medics had suddenly dis-
covered that they had finished all the
studying and work they had to do for
the day, and were faced with the
horrible specter of idleness.
* * *
They came to the place where the
new street was being carved out of the
landscape, and right away they saw
that they could play there to their
heart's content. And so, ithese in-
dustrious Medics pitched right in and
began digging a hole for a new hos-
pital or something. A frosh engineer
name alon oandad aa am fn fnir

in a Monumental Program of
SO NGS AND ARIAs

E
,
a

MONDAY -
HILL AUDITORIUM
A Limited Number of Single Tickets ,
Sale at the University School of Music
Morning, 8:30.

8P.M.

duin te enrl axonCoprae te niaa nt t' annt wh rn

Will Be On
Wednesday

.
t

i
,E
7

,d

earnings from thirteen and one-half t
per cent to ten per, cent. 'The only
reasons advanced for the proposed cut:
are that under the present system cer-
+nri n e~~n nfnn n n.Mn ie~ -m m - ir

tribute to their activity.
Man and woman through life are
found in a wide variety of contacts.
To limit the contact in the period of

A few: Season Choral Union Tickets admitting to

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