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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P'AGE SI'X

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TH"IRTY CAGE MEN'I
REPORT TO MTH ER
Basketball' Coach is Pessimistic In
Regard To Small Number of
Court Candidates
CHAMBERS ONLY VETERAN
With only 30 men reporting for the
first workout, Coach E. J. Mather of
the basketball squad is leaning toward
pessimism when confronted with a
question conceining the strength of
this year's team.
"Only one letter man, Capt. Ed.
Chambers, reported for practice Mon-
day night," Coach Mather said, "and
we had only 30 altogether. That is
not nearly enough for this time of
year. I would like to see many more
big, fast men trying for po'sitions.
"Of course there are a few veterans
on the football squad, but they will
not be out until after the close of tie
season. Oosterbaan, Molenda and
Harrigan, regulars of last year, and
Babcock, Baer, Squires, and Nyland
probably will not report until late in
November. Truskowski, the Varsity
football center, also will report. He
plays guard, and may be of some
val-ue."
In addition to Capt. Chambers, I
Schroeder, Gawne, and Kuenzel, AMA
men, also were on hand for the first
practice, and Nissen, McCoy, Aylger,
and Rose of last year's freshman team
took part in'the workout.
Michigan's hopes for a strong team
were raised somewhat when it was
learned that (Martin, Barley, and
Petrie were declared eligible, but it
will undoubtedly take two good men
to replace Doyle and.Ginn of the 1926e
champions.
The Michigan schedule this year in-
cludes five practice and 12 confer- !
ence games. The pre-season'tilts willa
be with M. S. C., Cornell College, of
Mt. Vernon, Iowa, who last year won
the championship of the Mid-west con-
ference, Syracuse, Maryland, and
Pittsburgh. The first four games will
be played in Ann 'Arbor, while on
Feb. 12 the Wolverines will journey
to Pittsburgh.t
Conference Season Opens Jan. 8 t
The conference season opens Jan.t
8 at Minnesota, and closes March 7i
with Iowa visiting Ann Arbor, and ini
between, home and home games will
be played with Illinois, Indiana, Pur-
due, and Chicago. This composes oneg
of the hardest schedules Michigan hasi
attempted in years. .

Famous Tennis Stars Of America And
France Start First Professional Tour

(By Associated Prces)
NEW YORK, Oct. 12.-Yale and
Princeton have agreed to blindfold
themselves as to each other's football
activities prior to their annual con-
flict, but they are being scouted by
other rivals.
The Middies, who tackle PrincetonI
next Saturday, are drilling steadily
in stopping Princeton formations,
gleaned by sailor scouts. Princeton
has just had its first secret workoutI
of the season.I
Dartmouth, which plays Yale next,
had Clark Tobin, All-American guard,
watching Yale turn back the Georgia
invasion last Saturday. As a result
the Dartmouth regulars are learning
how Yale does it, via the chalk board
route and dummy scrimmage. Jess.
Hawley, Dartmouth coach, opposes
the abolition of scouting.
Pennsylvania is preparing a defense
for Chicago formations.
Gene Tunney has been invited to
make his college football debut as a
linesman in Lehigh's struggle with the
Quantico Marines, Saturday.
Harvard refuses to be downcastI
over defeats from Geneva and Holy
Cross. The trouble, Coach Horween
j thinks, is . lack- of experience under
pressure. There will be more of that
experience gained from coming en-
counters..
SPEEDBALL RESULTS
Delta Sigma Phi, with a total of 22,
points was high point scorer in yester-
day's play in the interfraternity speed-
ball tournament. Phi Chi with 17
points, Sigma Alpha Mu with 16, and
Phi Lambda Kappa with 14 comprise
the other high scorers.
Complete results of the second
round are "as follows:
Kappa Sigma1-Delta Phi 0 (default.)
Tau Epsilon Kappa 13-Phi Kappa
Psi 3.
Phi Kappa 1-Delta Chi 0 (default.)
Sigma Nu 1-Psi Upsilon 0 (default.)
Delta Sigma Phi 22-Sigma Chi 4.
Delta Upsilon 13--Phi Kappa Alpha 5.
Phi Kappa Sigma 1-Theta Delta Chi
0 (default.)
Phi Lambda Kappa 14-Gamma Sig-
ma 1.I
Phi Chi 17 -Phi Beta Delta 4.,
Alpha Delta Phi f-Xi Psi th 0 (de-
fault.)
Sigma Alpha Mu 16-Delta Kappa Ep-
silon 7.

!Wolverine Football T
Of 17 Games Playe
When Michigan and Minnesota clash
on Saturday at Ferry field, it will be
the 17th meeting of the football teams
of the rival institutions. The two
elevens first encountered each other
in 1892, with the Gophers winning, a
feat which they have accomplished
only twice since that early date.
Following the first game, Michigan
and Minnesota have maintained foot-
ball relations every season except dur-
ing the periods, 1898 to 1901, 1904 to
1908, and 1911 to 1918. The total years
that have elapsed since the first game
total 34, while 17 contests have been
Played.
This means that the Wolverines
have maintained an average of one
game every other year, while this sea-
son, the teams will meet on two dif-
ferent occasions. Dr. Clarence Spears
will have no complaint to make with
the Wolverines as far as dodging the-
Gop'hers is concerned.
Michigan's assaults against Minne-
sota have usually been successful, and
out of 17 games played Michigan has
won 13, tied one, and lost three.
Peculiarly, in every game from which
Minnesota has emerged victorious, the
Northmen have scored the same num-
1 ber of points, 34. Another feature of
'interest in connection with the con-
tests between these two teams is that
Minnesota has never been able to
hold Michigan scoreless, while on the
other hand, in eight of the games,
Michigan has blanked the Gophers.
The worst beating that Michigan
ever gave Minnesota occurred in 1921
when the Wolverines got the long end
of. a 38 to 0 count.
Minnesota beat Michigan worse in
the first game -ever played between
the two schools, 34 to 6, than in any
other. In 1919 Minnesota scored a 34
to 7 victory. Since then the North-
men have only scored seven points
against the maize and blue.
MANN iPLANS FACULTY RACE
Announcement was made yesterday
by Coach Matt Mann that the faculty
swimming class will soa begin a ten
mile race. The competitors will swim
four days a week.
Coach Mann also said that the fac-
ulty class will meet on Monday, Wed-
nesday, and Friday at 12:15 o'clock,
and- not, on- Wednesday at 12:45, as
was prmviotisly announced in the Daily.

eams Have Won 13
.d Against Minnesota
Previous scores are as follows:
1892-Michigan.. 6 Minnesota...34
1893--Michigan. .20 Minnesota..34
1895--Michigan..20 Minnesota.. 0.
1896-Michigan.. 6 Minnesota.. 4
1897-Michigan..14 Minnesota.. 0
1902-Michigan..23 Minnesota.. 6
1903--Michigan.. 6 Minnesota.. 6
1909-Michigan..15 Minnesota.. 6
1910-Michigan.. 6 Minnesota.. 0
1919-Michigan.. 7 Minnesota..34
1920-Michigan.. 3 Minnesota.. 0
1921-Michigan..38 Minnesota.. 0
1922-Michigan. .16 Minnesota.. 7f
1923-Michigan..10 Minnesota.. 0
1924--Michigan..13 Minnesota.. 0

HOFF ASKS PERMISSION
TO REMAIN IN COUNTRY
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., Oct. 12.-
Charles Hoff, Olympic track star' and
holder of the indoor and outdoor pole
vault records, today conferred with -
immigration officials here in an at' "
tempt to remain in this country after
Friday.
The original permit granted to Hoff
expired some months ago, btt the
Vaulting Viking was .granted the opL
'portunity to remain here until Friday
so that he might appear in exhibi-
tions throughout the country. Of late
he has been having considerable trou-
ble with authorities over the terms of
his contracts. At the present time he
is appearing in a vaudeville act in'
Minneapolis.
Hoff desires to remain in this couu,-
try for a long period of time and has
filed a petition again with the Wash,
ington authorities after having been
denied permission less than one week
ago.
Classified ads bring big results for
mioney inves-_4

I
I

1

1925-Michigan..35 Minnesota..

.0

131

Total points 238

COLUMBUS.-Except for a few box
seats, the Ohio State university stad-
im has been sold out for the Ohio-
Michigan game Nov. 13.

4I

mony _std.Ad

A,I

at $50.00

Shoes
$10.00o

;i

Hate

Reading fromt left to right: Richards, Miss Browne, Mlle6 Lenglen, and
Feret.
Who have been signed by C. C. Pyle, the great promoter of profes-
sional athletics, and have started on the first professional tennis tour
ever made. Mlle. Suzanne Lenglen, ranking woman tennis player of the
world, was the first person to turn "pro" being followed by Paul Feret an-
other French tennis player. Vincent Richards, American Davis cup star,
is the last addition to the professionals, Mary K. Browne already having
agreed to meet Mlle. Lenglen.

$6.50

I

{

IMPORTED HALF HOSE

LITTLE DRIVES
BADGERS HARD
Although the Wisconsin football
team has completed its practice con-
tests without a loss, Coach George Lit-
tle is driving his men hard this week
n an attempt to get them into condi-
tion for the Purdue game to be played
Saturday at Lafayette.
The disappointing feature of the
game with Kansas Saturday was the
neffectiveness of the Badger attack
when a few yards would have meant a'
score. The Cardinal attack netted more
han 15 times as much yardage as that
gained by the Kansas team. I
The game was a contest between
two former Michigan coaches, Little~
nd Cappon, with the Wisconsin coach
holding the edge. The Cardinal line I
was much stronger than ever, but the
>verhead attack was working poorly.
However, the Badger defense for the
aerial heaves was relatively as strong
as the attack was weak, and the invad-
rs completed only a few tosses in the
ntire game.

TITAN GRIDMEN
TO PLAY LOYOLA
DETRTOIT, Oct. 12-The University
of Detroit football team will travel 1,-
800 miles southward this week to New
Orleans, city of historic and literary
background, for its game with Loyola
university October 16.
This will be the second and final
trip away from home for the Titans
this sdason. Six remaining games 'on
the schedule following the Loyola
game, will be played in the University
of Detroit stadium here.
Loyola is a new competitor for the
Detroit eleven, but they will have the-
achievement of the Red and White
team of 1920 to aim at when they
leave for New Orleans Wednesday.
That year, the Titans defeated Tulane
university 7-0, at New-Orleans, and
repeated their victory the next year at
Detroit, when they again defeated the
southern eleven, 14-10.
Having already been seasoned by
three hard games, Coach Dorais be-
Nieves the Detroit eleven should be at
the top of their form for Loyola.

$2.00,
SCARFS
$3.50 to $5.00

$350
PIGSKINS
$5.00

fHOMPSON, & PITTS

1007 South University Ave.

i

:7 -'.

READ THE WANT ADS

.. _..4at

FRESHMAN GYM CLASSES
All freshman groups will be-
gin therrequired physical train-
ing practice for men this
week. Freshmen who have not
already classified should do so
immediately at Waterman gyni-
nasium, and arrange for lock-
ers and the necessary equipment.
DR. GEORGE A MAY.

I'
at
h
O]
a,
a1
e:
e:

SPECIAL TRAINS
OCTOBER 29TH
'Via
Michigan Central R. R.
to

E

BALTIMORE, MD.

for the
Michigan-Navy Game
OCTOBER 30TH
The Michigan Central Railroad will operate SPECIAL
TRAINS consisting of all steel Pullman sleepers, com-
partment cars, and dining cars from Ann Arbor to Balti-
more, Md., leaving Ann Arbor 4:30 P. M. Eastern Stand-
ard Time, October 29th, arriving at Baltimore, Md., Penn-
sylvania Station, 8:45 A. M. the morning of October 30th.
Returning-Special Trains will leave Baltimore after
the game at 6:30 P. M., October 30th, from the Pennsyl-
vania Station, arriving at Ann Arbor 10:30 A. M. Eastern
Standard Time, Sunday October 31st.

I.
. ;

/ ^' Ientify the arestoC,'te
of
white doc
join the reat fraternity
of Lifetime wielders
. The student gives the fountain pen its hardest
test. He must use it almost constantly-and
severely. Therefore he is the biggest buyer of
j the Sheaffer Lifetime.* It's the pen for strenuous
and unfailing action. And since it is built of en-
during and brilliant green Radite and guaranteed
against all repair costs, it is always the pen of
economy. Its first cost is its last cost. Spot it
by the dot-sold at better stores everywhere.
Price, in Breen or'black, ,$8.75. Student's sPecial, $7.50. Pencil, $4.25
Rl.n ., 7 .o..1 7 e 'o ,erSt (

V. - ,-- - e- r

RESILIO
The Neckwear of
Supreme Achievement
$1.50 and U
Unusual designs and colorings.
With us exclusively in the better grades.

J

.:

t

Reduced round trip

r- (., -
I 'A

railroad fare >from Ann Arbor,

A..
'7'
.,.m
y4

.

good on Special Trains only is $21.77.

Pullman accommo-

dations as listed below, are extra.
Lower berth, round trip ..........$15.00
Upper berth, round trip ...........12.00
Compartment, round trip ...........42.00
Drawing room, round trip ..........54.00
Make reservations early.

V

11

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