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May 23, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-23

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ESTABLISHED
1890.

C, 4r,

Ar

uU~m

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVI. No. 175 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 23, 1926 EIGHT PAGES
fllflh flfl nonnsistru u.,e." ... 1.. 1---- --------V------ -

PRICE FIVE CENTS

T DELIVER FOURTH'
CONVO0CATION TALKI,
1RESIDENT LITTLE WILL LEAD
PRAYER AT LAST MEETING
OF SERIES
NIEHAUS WILL SING'
Former President of Depauw Iwiiver-
city Has Been Official of Netliq- ;
dist Church Since 1894
Dr. Francis J. McConnell, bishop of
the Methodist Episcopal church and'
a liberal religious leader, will give
the address of the Sunday convacation,
sponsored by the Student council atI
11 o'clock, this morning in Hill audi-
torium. Bishop McConnell's subject

.o.umng i wLZsf
Elections Stir
Up Nationalists
(By Associated Press)
POSEN, May 22.-The decision of
the Pilsudski government to hold a.
presidential election by the national
Assembly in Warsaw late this monthI
has created a politcal situation
fraught with many possibilities.
The Nationalist parties, who are
meeting here, express great amaze-
ment at the decision. "It is beneath
the dignity of the nation to have its
representatives elect a new head of
the republic in a place where so much
blood has flowed," a leading conserva-
tive told the Associated Press.
"The argument is being used that
foreign countries will interpret the
selection of Warsaw as an indication
that Warsaw again is perfectly calm
and normal," he continued, "yet we{
of the right parties think that this
view is too optimistic." The inerad-
icable fact is that Pilsudski overturn-3

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VLPUIIEb WILL AUFc
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AS DRY FFICIALS,
~IN WESTER N STATE
SECRETARY ANDREWS ISSUES
ENLISTMENT ORDER UNDER
COOLIDGE AUTHORITY

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Wisconsin.........
Purdue............
Illinois ...........
Northwestern.....
Ohio State........
Minnesota.......
Chicago..........
Indiana...........
Iowa..............

W. L. Pct.
9 1 .900
6 2 .750
6 4 .600
5 4 .555
5 5 .500
3 4 .428
3 4 .428
2 4 .333
2 5 .285
0 8 .000

tOVE
aNQI
, rlI

lINE NINE, TRACKMEN5
JISH ILLINOIS ATHLETES#%
HARDl FOUGHT CONTESTS

will be "Christian Knowledge." ed the legal government at Warsaw.
President Clarence Cook Little will He did it once and he may do it again
give the convocation prayer. if the new government does not suit
Bishop McConnell has been connect- him.
ed with the Methodist Episcopal Although the Nationalists have ex-
church in an executive way since pressed their disapproval of the se-
shortly after his graduation from Ohio lection of Warsaw, it is more or less
Wesleyan university in 1894. Follow- taken for granted that they will par-
ing his study of religion and religious ticipate in the ballot.
problems at Ohio Wesleyan, he pur- "If we fail to go, there will be chaos
sued graduate work in the same sub- ahead," declared one leader, "as Pro-
jects at Boston university, receiving visional Presiden't Rataj legally alone
his doctor's degree in 1897. He has is entitled to call the meeting of the
received LL.D. degrees from Hanover national Assembly and to fix the date,
college and Weslyan university. In and the place, we who stand for leg-
1894 he assumed the natorne nf the alism must bow to his decision wheth

SENATE HITS ORDER
Dry Cief SaIys Loc.-l Police Wl
Be Used Only With Their
Consent
(By Associated Press)
WASHINIGTON, May 22. Enlistment
of California deputy sheriffs as fed-
eral prohibition officers was ordered
today by Assistant Secretary An-
drews, of the Treasury, under author-
ity granted by President Coolidge to
employ state, county, and municipal
police in dry law enforcement.
He announced that local officers
Licoln C. Andrevs would be used only in California for
Assistant secretary of the Treasury the present and that enlargement of
who has ordered enlistments of depu- the federal force would -be confined
ties for dry law enforcement. to deputy sheriffs. No consideration,
he added, has been given to nation
wide application of the new executivo
order.
I[T [ 9GUE STOPTaking cognizance of criticism III
more rigid enforcement of the Vol-
stead law, Gen. Andrews declared that
'"this is not thetlme to talk about
states' rights so rear as prohibition is
Sumis ewPo lT iconcerned."

Yesterday's Gariles
Michigan 5, Illinois 4.
Purdue 7, Chicago 5.
Wisconsin 7, Northwestern 6.
Indiana S, Minnesota 6.
Games Tomorrow
Indiana at Northwestern.
Purdue- at Wisconsin.

'Meet Is Featured By Upsets;
Defeats Illinois Captain
220-Yard Low hurdles

LAsser
lIn

MICHIGAN GOLFERS
DEFEAT WISCONSIN

Wolverines
hIigh

AND TIES FOR AN0THER TO
SUORE 14 POUNTS
FOUR MARKS FALL

Win, 22 to 2, Playing In
Wind; Lead 11 to 1
By Noon

.+..vv. aav wu . .Uau a.U L11G k CA LVIULVG VL Liltz t
1 t{

1 McCONNELL RECEP'TION
An informal reception will be
held for Bishop Francis J. Mc-
Connell from 3:30 to 5 o'clock
this afternoon in the Union. The
informal meeting is planned to
allow students and faculty to
know Bishop McConnell and to
permit of a discussion of con-j
temporary religious problems.
Methodist Episcopal church of West
Chelmsford, Mass., and after several
charges in Massachusetts, became the
minister of the New York Avenue
Methodist Episcopal church in Brook-
lyn. From 1909 to 1912 Bishop Mc-
Connell was the president of Depauw
university, and in the latter year was
elected bishop of the church in which
he is a leading figure. He is the
author of about 10 books on religious
subjects, among which are "The In-
crease of Faith", "Democratic Chris-
tianity", and "The Preacher and the
People." He has been the past presi-
dent of the Religious Education Asso-
ciation of America. His home is in
Pittsburgh.
The musical programh of the convo-
cation will be similar to previous ser-
vices. William J. Skeat, graduate of
the School of Music, will be at the
organ and Julius Niehaus, S of M, will
sing.
The convocation today will be the
final service of those inaugurated a
month ago by the Student council for
the faculty and students of the Uni-
versity. It is expected that the series'
will be continued next year by the new
body.{
The musical program is as follows:
Organ Prelude-Sunrise... Karg-Elert
Mr. Skeat!
Hymn..............All Saints New
Audience
Prayer ...........................
...President Clarence Cook Little
Offeratory-
Solo-How Lovely Are Thy Dwell-
ings ........................Liddle
Mr. Niehaus
Address-Christian Knowledge
Dr. Francis J. McConnell
Organ Postlude-Gloria (Twelfth
Mass) ..................... Mozart
Mr. Skeat
The service will begin promptly at
11 o'clock.
PRESIDENT IS SELECTED
BY ARCHITECTURALDROUP'
William E. Preston, '27A, was elect-'
ed president of the Architectural so-
ciety at a meeting of that organization
last Friday night. Preston recently
won the prize for the winning decora-
tion scheme of the architects' May
party.
SYDNEY. - Australia's drought
that caused disastrous bush fires and
threatened the crops, has been brok-
n.

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w, uca ia1-p saY~s : l ; U VtiY. :o Ā¢sarmt,
er we like it or not." unit osmmiittee; Russo-German
I rdy Atacked
WEATHER DELAYS REAL SECURITY SOUGHT
(By Associated Press)
09110ONGENEVA, 1May 22.-Now that there
Iis partial security through the League
of Nations covenant and the ocarno
Aeronautical Students Will Atte t accords, make it real and effective
and help on disarmament by arrang-
To Pass Test So As To Pilot ing immediately for the swift opera-
Ascensions tion of mutual assistance in wartime-.
such is France's latest contribution
CRAFT TO CARRY SIX to the disarmament stulies, announ-
ced at Geneva today.1
France's initiative in presenting
Due to the unfavorable weather con- this proposal through M. Paul-Bon-
ditions prevalent, the flight planied cour, to the drafting committee of the
for yesterday morning in the Michi- preparatory disarmament commission
gan I, the University's balloon, has is deemed of vast importance to the
success of the limitation of land
een postponed, and pending weather armaments in Europe, because many
conditions, will take place today. European nations have insisted that
One of the purposes of the flight i they will disarm only in proportion to
will be to develop a student. pilot. the security actually achieved.
Ralph Upson, chief engineer of the Cites Balkan War
Aircraft Development corporation of Calling attention to the fact that
Derroitheo potetebalooraonitsthe recent Greco-Bulgar conflict was
Detrit, who piloted the balloon on its quickly settled largely because the I
premier flight, recommended that an parties ceased hostilities at the re-
aeronautical student be trained to take puest eeaglesfatithscre-
the position of official pilot of the quest of thle League of Nations coun-
Michigan I instead of borrowing h cil, M. Paul-Boncour recommended
pilot as has been necessary in the past. a that the league study the advisability
Six balloosn ligtsar neas, beof giving power to the league council
fore the student receives his pilot's to impose an armistice, immediately a
licensesconflict breaks out. He also urged
As tle ans we',de fo da, that the council be authorized to ex-
trip, the balloon was to have b en ty erce this power witlhout the neces-
fildwth hy dron Friday iht at sity of a unanimous vote.
troit. tai in deciding upon a flagrant a-
Because of the fact that hydrogen is gression, but, quite contrary to the
being used to inflate the balloon, the existing custom, the burden of
ship will have greater lifting power, unanimity should rest upon the shol-
and six passengers will be taken up ders of the nation that pretended the
as compared to the four who went on aggiession (id not exist.
the last flight when coal gas was I Desir Unai mouis Votec s
used. This is regarded in League circles
as France's answer to the provisions
of the recent Russo-German treaty,
that Germany, as a member of the
League of Nations council will remain
neutral in any coalition movement
HC T ILLINagainst Russia; in plain words, the
FDT nch explanation is taken as mean-
ing that if Russia, for example,
~~-s t . should commit a flagrant aggressionI
)ppos ng Goups aptur Nominatio s Against another nation, Germany or
For Senator Aid Governor any other member of the council,
(By Associated Press) would be obliged to secure a unani-
PHILADELPHIA,tMd 2P oi mous vote, not to prove that Russia
HMay 22.--Political was guilty, but to prove that she was
party leaders in Pennsylvania still are not guilty.
mulling over the returns of last Tues-
day's primary trying to figure out who
got the better of one of the most des- BALLOON CLUB
Aerate contests in recent years in the '
state. T
The Vare-Beidleman group won OF AIR FLIGHTS
the United States senatorship, whileO
the Mellon-Pepper wing of the party-----
apparently captured the governorship. Following the regular meeting of
Noses still are being counted as to the Aeronautical society at 8 o'clock
which faction captured the majority of tomorrow night in the Union, the bal-
the members of the state committee loon section of the club will hold a
which will reorganize next month and special meeting to discuss the mci-n
elect a state chairman, to succeed W. dents of the last balloon flight taken
Harry Baker, friendly to the forces of by aeronautical students in the Michi-
Edward E. Biedleman, the defeated gan II, the University balloon.-
gubernatorial candidate. Pictures taken by Milton Thompson,
grad., of the first flight when the bal-
T Iady"loon flew over the campus, and the
T By barograph record of the trip will be
Honorary Society shown.
Lt. Charles D. Williams, of the
engineering staff of the Aircraft De-
Tau Sigma Delta, honorary archi- velopment corporation of Detroit, will
tectural society, held its annual ban- be the speaker of the evening. He will
quet last night at the Green Tree Inn, discuss the possibilities of forming
at which Hirne ten new mn Pr w. ill---- ~fn fJnT,; C~n ~-

Calls For Support
"When the people wrote the
Eighteenth Amendment to the Const i-
tution," he continued, "they decided
that federal government should have
the police power hitherto reserved by
the states. They forced us to use the
police power, making the jurisdiction
concurrent between the federal and
state governments. I must lean on the
states and communities to carry their
burden in enforcement of the prohi-
bition law."
Authority provided by the executive
order was desired principally to per-
mit closer inspection of rural dis-
tricts, Gen. Andrews explained, adding
that it was for that reason deputy
sheriffs would be enlisted.
Local police will be used only with
their consent, the dry chief said, dis-
closing that Ned Green, California
prohibition administrator, had re-
quested authority to employ deputy
sheriffs volunteering their services.
Gmt Order I ecalled
Prohibition officials doubted the
argument advanced in the Senate that
he order was unconstitutional and re-1
'qlled that President Grant had per-
witted the appointment of sheriffs as
deputy marshalls. The order of Pres-
ident Coolidge was an amendment of
Grant's order forbidding federal of-
ficers to accept employment as local
officials.
General Andrews differs with the
view of Prohibition Commissioner
Jones that one purpose of the new
authority would be to allow local
officers, clothed with federal power, to
ignore state, county and city boun-
daries in the pursuit of prohibition
violators. He said no consideration
has been given to this point.
He also said he had no intention
now of enlisting city police as pro-
hibition agents, and had given no
consideration as to the number of
states in which services of local ofh-
cers might be utilized.

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CONNER PUTTS 30 FEET
(Special to The Daily)
MADISON, Wis., May 22.-Michi-
gan's golf team continued to play ex-
cellently, and defeated Wisconsin here
his afternoon by the overwhelmingy
core of 22-2. Following their win over
Northwestern in such a fashion'
stamped the Wolverine team as one of
he best in the Big Ten, excelled by
Chicago alone, which has not lost aj
Conference meet.
A high wind, which swept the
course during the morning, seemed to
other the Wisconsin men but had no
ffect on the Wolverine golfers who
pimped into a lead of 11-1 by noon.
Captain Feely shot the best round1
of the morning to take his match withi
77. ie scored 2 1-2 points to 1-2 for
heldon, his Cardinal opponent.
Glover with a 79 took all three points
rom Grimm, and Cole shooting 80 did
he same against Feith of Wisconsin.
Conor's 79 was good enough to win
1-2 points more at the expense of
lenendon.
In the afternoon, Glover and Feely
f Michigan took all six points fromI
Sheldon and Grimm, the Wolverine
pair having a best ball score of 70,
which is two below par.
The second of the foursomes proved
o be the most thrilling of the match-f
s, with Connor and Cole shooting 751
nd 76 respectively to win one up for
the eighteen holes, and capture five of
he six points. After being three down
t the end of the fifth hole, the Michi-
an players staged a splendid come-
ack to tie Clenendon and Feith at the
nd of the first nine. Connor made a
0 foot putt to win the ninth hole for
ne of the best performances of the
ay, and Cole upheld his share of the
urden by shooting the last seven
holes in one stroke under par.
Detroit Bodvy
Of Engineers
Visits Campus

Taking eight first places of the 15
events on the program, five of these
coming in the field events, Michigan
track men scored a victory over the
strong Illinois squad by a seven
1,point margin yesterday afternoon on
Ferry field, the final score being 71
to 64.
In spite of the fact that the athletes
were handicapped by a rain soaked
track, two records were broken in the
course of the afternoon. Two other
dual meet marks were bettered, and
two others tied.
The greatest upset of the afternoon
came when Lasser, a Michigan hurdler
defeated Captain Werner of Illinois in
the 220 yard low hurdle race. Wer-
ner, who along with Guthrie can be
classed as the bst hurdlers in the
Conference was favored to win, and
Lasser's brilliant performance will be
long remembered by Michigan fans.
The Wolverine hurdler got a fair start,
and was trailing the leaders at the
half way mark by several yards. He
crept up gradually, and was just a yard
behind Werner over next to the last
hurdle. Both men were tied over the
last barrier, and Lasser finished in a
fast sprint that gave him the race by a
I scant margin. The time of :24.5 sec-
onds betters the dual meet record of
:25.6 seconds.I
Another upset cane when Captain
Freyberg, Wolverine middle distance
man was beaten in both' the mile and
the half mile. In the former event
E Freyberg was in last place going into
the last lap, but he gained on the
others and was leading the field with
half a lap to go. He let out a sprint
at this point, but this seemed to sap
his energy, and he was beaten by both
McElwee and Rue of Illinois, the
Michigan leader taking third.
Capt. Freyberg Loses
In the half mile Freyberg led, until
the last turn, and then he was over-,
taken 'by Sittig, who won the event.
Freyberg trailed him by three yards
and Bean, another Michigan man, took
third.
The two records that were made
came in the hammer throw and in the
discus. Hawkins, the Michigan ham-
mer man won his event with a throw
of 157 feet 1 inch, this throw breaking
his own previous dual meet mark of
144 feet 5 inches. This mark is but a
foot and seven inches short of the
Ferry field record of 158 feet 8 inches
held by Ralph Rose of Michigan.
Doyle's mark of 141 feet 1 inch in
the discus breaks both the dual meet
land Ferry field records. The former
1 dual meet record of 136 feet 1 1-2
inches was held by Weiss of Illinois,
while the old Ferry field record of
140 feet 8 inches was made by Higgins
of Chicago.
Buck Hester again repeated, tak-
ing the 100 yard dash in the fast time
of :09.8 seconds which tied the dual
meet record. Hale, who was expected
to give him a hard battle in this event
took third, behind Leschinsky, of
Michigan, who placed second.
Lesehinsky Wins Dash
Leschinsky marked up five points
i more for Michigan when he led the
field in the 220 yard dash. Hale press-
ed him hard all the way, and the
Michigan sprinter wa forced to make
a great finish in order to beat him.
His time of :21.2 seconds is just three
tenths of a second behind the Ferry
Ifield record.
Northrop was the high point man of
the meet, the versatile Wolverine ac-
counting for 14 markers. He was tied
with his team mate Prout in the pole
vault, won the broad jump, and took
first in the javelin throw. His leap of
23 feet 4 7-8 inches in the broad
jump is the best that he has done
this year, and it came as a surprise,
for Wallace, the Illinois jumper was
favored to beat him.
Schoch, the IIllini quarter miler tied
the dual meet record of :49.4 when he
beat Feinsinger, Michigan 440 man.
Feinsinger put up a brilliant battle,
but lost to the flashy runner by a
scant two yards.
Werner was the high point man for
the Champaign team, taking a first and
a second. His win in the 120 yard
1 high hurdles was expected, and his
time of :14.7 seconds for this event

betters the former dual meet mark of
:15.4 seconds.

1WILL ASSURE CONFERENCE
TITLE FOR VARSITY
LATE [RALLY WINS
Miller Pitches Second Victory in Week
Against Illini; Edgar Leads
Team In Hitting
By rallying in the ninth inning and
beating Illinois 5 to 4 yesterday, the
Wolverines virtually assured them-
selves of the 1926 Conference base-
ball championship.
Unless Wisconsin, who is in the
second place, can beat the Maize a'nd
Blue Saturday on Ferry field and
win its remaining game with Chicago,
Michigan iill have undisputed claim
on its third Big Ten title of the year.
Despite the threatening weather a
large crowd was on hand to see
Miller tame the Illini for the second
time in seven days. Miller, pitching
his characteristic game, allowed the
visitors but ten hits, which he kept
scattered in all but three innings. The
big pitcher received excellent support,
the team making but two errors be-
hind him none of which resulted in
scores.
Edgar, handicapped by an injured
and bandaged hand, contributed in
no small measure to the success of his
team. Besides leading his team in
hiitting with three singles in four
times at bat, driving in one run, and
scoring one himself, the sterling
catcher contributed two of the field-
ing features of the afternoon, the first
when he jumped and crashed into
the wire netting on the grandstand
to catch a foul fly, which the umpire
ruled was trapped on the wire, and
the second when he toppled head first
over the railing in front of the grand
stand in attempting to catch another
foul fly.
Oosterbaan Stars
Oosterbaan led the Michigan team in
scoring by crossing the plate with
three of the five runs. The All-Ameri-
can end also got one hit, and caught
a difficult fly off Hoffman's bat in the
eighth inning.
Michigan scored in the first inning
after Lange singled through the box,
took second on Jordan's overthrow of
first, and scored from the midway
cushion on Pucklewartz's single to
centerfield.
Illinois tied the count in the next
inning. Hoffman walked. O'Keffe
singled to left field. Major bunted a
safe hit down the third baseline, and
in an attempt to catch him at first
base Miller threw wild allowing Hoff-
man to score.
illini Score in Ninth
Illinois scored one run in the
eighth inning. Jordan was safe on
an error and scored on singles by
O'Keefe and Jordan. The Illini tied
the count in the ninth inning by scor
ing twice. Ludham singled and Dun-
law walked. Both runners advanced
a base while Jordan was retired at
first, and Kinderman drove them both
home with a single to center.
Michigan came back in their h'alf of
the ninth inning and won the game.
Jablonowski singled to.center but was
forced at secon' by Oosterbaan.
Edgar singled off Ludham's shin, and
Miller walked filling the bases. Lud-
ham, losing control forced Oosterbaan
across the plate with the winning run.

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Student members of the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers met!
Ca 0 i the Detroit members of that body in
[their annual get-together last night at,
I a dinner at the Union. The Detroiti
delegation arrived in time to attendi
the Michigan-Illinois baseball game
in the afternoon. After the dinner at
Annual elections for the Board of night, the society adjourned to the as-
Trustees of the Student Christian as- sembly hall of the West Engineering
sociation will be held Tuesday, May 1 uilding where a program of talks and
25. Booths will be open from 10 to 3 { discussions was held. Wyeth Allen,j
o'clock at Newberry and Lane halls. ; industrial engineer of Milwaukee,
All students of the University who are spoke of industrial hygiene and thera-
members of Christian churches are peutics, as applied to industry.
eligible to vote. L. F. Beach, assistant in the mechan-1
The nominees have been divided into ical engineering department, pre-
seven pairs, one to be elected from sented in a brief paper the results of
each set. The term of office on the an experimental study undertaken by
board is three years. The following him concerning the failure of the 600
are the candidates: Donald E. Hall, K. V. engine-generator hi the univer-
'29, Martin Mol, '29, Horatio J. Ab- sity power plant.
bott, H. M. Slanson, Prof. Ferdinand Max Benjamin, '26E, student as-
N. Menefee, Registrar Ira M. Smith, sistant in the mechanical engineering
Dean E. E. Day, Prof. Charles C. ; department, gave one of the phases
Fries, Theodore R. Hornberger, '27, of the comprehensive study now being
Frederick H. Shillito, '27, Anna B. conducted by the Society for the Pro-
Arnold, '27, Dean George W. Patter- motion of Engineering Education to
son, and Prof. Arthur D. Moore. determine what becomes of the engi-
neering graduates. Part of the data
for the society 'has been collected by
Officers Chosen the engineering college, and is avail-
By a s f.Ban able for inspection.
J The meeting was well attended by
representative members of the De-
At a meeting of the Varsity band troit branch of the organization.
recently the following were elected _.
officers for the coming year: R. F.1
Wells, '27, president, Hilary Deason, 1 Extra Invitations

Illinois
AB

Worth, 3b..........3
Jordan, 2b.........5
Kinderman, lf ...... 5
Hoffman, 11)........ 3
O'Keefe, rf........5
Major, cf...........4
Finn, ss .......... 4
Kusinske, c......
Kudlum, p......... 3
*Dunlaw, 3b.......1
**Flannigan, c .... 1
Totals ..........3G

R'
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0

H'
0
1
1
1
2
3
1
0
1
0
0

PO
2
2
4
12
1
1
1
3
0
0
0

A
2
5
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0

E
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
.0
x

0 0 0 0 0

*Batted for Worth in the fifth in-
ning.
**Batted for Kusinski in the eight
inning.
Michigan

Loos, ss..........
Wilson, lb.........
Lange, if..........
Puckelwartz, cf ....
Kubicek, 2b....
Jablonowski, 3b ....
Oosterbaan, 3b ....
Edgar, c.........
Miller, p . ....
Totals ...........2

AB
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
1
0

H
0
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
0

PO
1
8
1
1
2
1
2
10

A
3
0
0
0
2
1
0
1

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
.

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36 5 10 27' 10 2

9

r~a.-

'27, secretary, and Arthur Cook, '27E,

Summaries Two base hit-Major.
Base on balls-Miller, 4; Ludlum, 2.

i Assuqred Seoniors~

I

I I

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