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May 22, 1926 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-22

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ESTABLISHED
1890

'C

4itF
t an
9 1,

vat.

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

YOL. XXXVI. No. 174

EIGHT PAGES:

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 22, 192G

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

__

}

I

VARI TTACMEN
Will MEET ILLINI
SQUAD HERE TODAY
EXPECT MANY MARKS TO FALL
AS LEADING B6 TEN
SQUADS CLAS
BOTH UNDEFEATED
Wolverines Favored To Score Heavily
In Dashes; Visitors Strong
In Hurdle Events
In what should prove to be one of
the hardest fought track and field
meets ever seen on Ferry field, Michi-
gan and Illinois will vie for suprem-
acy at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon.
Neither team has lost an outdoor
dual meet this season, and both hold
victories over the strong Iowa squad,
holders of the Conference indoor title.
Although it is impossible to judge the
two teams by comparing scores, since
track meets vary with weather and
track conditions, Illinois defeated the
Ilawkeyes by 16 points, while the.Wol-
verines had a ten point lead over the
Iowa team.
In the fast competition that is ex-
pected from the two teams today many
records are expected to fall.dAt pres-
ent most of the dual' meet records are
held by Illinois men, but it is ex-
pected that after today's meet quite
a few of them will change hands, eith-
er to Michigan men, or to other Il11-
nois men.
Favor Hester to Win
In the 100 yard dash Hester is looked
to continue his steady string of wins,
although he will be pressed by Hale
of Illinois who has turned in the fast
time of :09.9 seconds for the distance.
'Third place will be a toss up between
Kelly and Leschinsky of Michigan, and
it is quite likely that the winner will
shatter the existing dual meet record
of :09.8 seconds.
The 220 yard dash should prove to
be another fast race, as Hale is ex-
pected to push Leschinsky to his limit
to win. Feinsinger, Michigan quarter
miler will have to be at his best to
defeat Schoch, Illini star. Both men
have gone under 50 seconds for the
distance this season, and the race
should prove to be one of the best on
the card. Herrnstein of Michigan may
get third, but he will be pushed to the
limit by Miehock of Illinois and his
team mate Oldheiser.
If Coach Farrell decides to use Cap-
tain Freyberg in the mile only, Illinois
ought to score heavily in the half.
Sittig has lone 1:58.6 for the distance,
and this time is better than any that
the Michigan 880 men have turned in
this season. Bean, Wagner and Beals
are the Maize and Blue entries in this
event.
The mile should go to Freyberg,
with Jung favored for second place.
Coach Gill will use White, the Illini
distance man in either the mile or
two mile. If White rns in the mile,
then the race should be quite interest-
ing, as he has already done 4:27.8 for
the event this year. Callahan is look-
ed upon to win the two mile run pro-
viding White is not entered. Wells, the
other Michigan entry in the longer run
will most likely take second or third
depending on White's entry.
Captain Werner is almost a sure bet
in both the high and low hurdles. It
is not likely that Michigan men can
score much in these events, although
Voelker might come through in the
righs, and Lasser ortSnider in the
lows. At best not more than six or
teven points can be gleaned by the
Wolverines from the hurdles.
Expect Record In Shot
On past performances it looks as
though Lyon should establish a new
dual meet record to win the shot put,
with Munz pressing hm hard. Shive-
ly, Lovette and Doyle are the probable

contenders for third place. Weeks,I
Aeislahan and . Trimble will fight it
out for first place in the high jump,I
and the former is given an edge on the
Illinois men.
One of the features of the meet willa
undoubtedly be the pole vault. In this
event there are six men who can go
over 12 feet, Northrop, White, Huff,
Prout, Barnes and Seed being capable
.f this. The winner should take the
event at over 12 feet 6 inches, and it is
quite likely that the dual meet record
of 12 feet 10% inches will fall.
Wallace and Fell of Illinois are both
capable of good distances in the broad
jump. The former has done 23 feet
S inches, while the latter's best per-
formance is 22 feet 111/% inches. North-
rop is capable of going over 22 feet,
and if he is in form should be right
tap among the winners. The discus
looks like an all Michigan event, al-
though it is not likely that they will
slam. Lyon, the Illinois weight man is
unble of heaving the saucer over 130

IAPPROVAL BY WILBUR CLOSES
CASE INVOLVING WILLIAMS
Iy Associated Press
WASHINGTON, May 21.-The
Ihectic case of Col. Alexander Wil-
liams, marine corps, convicted
by a navy courtmartial at San
Diego on charges of drunkenness,
became a closed incident today
when Secretary Wilbur approved
the findings of the court and the
sentence of loss of four numbers
on the promotion list.
Col. Williams will drop from
number eighteen on the list of
thirty-five marine corps colonels
to number twenty-two. The sen-
tence carries with it no other
penalty.

TO RECAST

AGENDA

POLITICAL SCIENCE
WORKREORGANIZED
Lecture System To Be Abolished In1
Beginning Course To Increase
Personal Contact
NEW COURSE IS LISTED
Complete reorganization of the in-
troductory course, resumption of in-r
struction in the field of foreign ser-I1
vice, and the addition of one entirely
new course are included in the pro-
gram of the political science depart-
ment for next year, as announced yes.-
terday.
In order to achieve more personal
contact between students and faculty
members, as well as to make possible
class discussion on points of interest
at the time they are brought up, the1
lecture system, which is at present
in force, will be abolished. Instead
of two lectures and a recitation sec-,
tion each week, there will be three
classes, all under the same professor
or instructor. There are now more
than 200 students in each lecture
group, and the recitation sections are
conducted by a different instructor
from the one who gives the lecture.
Under the new system, the classes
will be not larger than 35 students,
and by having' one instructor all the
time, more intimacy between him and
the student will be possible.
Every faculty member of the de-
partment will have at least one class.'
It is hoped that as various points are
brought up, they can be discussed in
class immediately, rather than being
forgotten or left until another meet-
ing as they usually are in the lecture
system. .
The resumption of courses in for-'
eign affairs, in view of the return of
Prof. Robert T. Crane to the staff, is
of special interest due to the recent
I Rogers act of Congress. This act made
the consular and diplomatic services
interchangeable, so that transfers can
be made from one to the other, and
provided a uniform scale of pay and
rank for the two, which are merged
as "The Foreign Services of the United
States." Arrangements were also made
so that promotions in the services
will be made only after examination
and certain periods of experience, and
will be made on a basis of merit only.
These measures obviate several ele-
ments which have deterred young men
from entering the foreign service, and
it isuexpected that they will now be
encouraged to do so.
For those who are interested in this
work, Professor Crane is to conduct
the course in "Diplomatic and Con-
sular Functions," which he gave be-
fore leaving the University two years
ago. Other courses relating to inter-
national politics will be "British Gov-
ernment," under Prof. Joseph R. Ha--1
I den; "International Law," and "The
Foreign Policy of the United States,"
both under Prof. Jesse S. Reeves.
With the return of Prof. Thomas H.
Reed from a lecture and study tour
in Europe, study in municipal gov-
i ernment will again be provided. Dr.
James K. Pollock will inaugurate an
entirely new course in "Political Par-
ties," based in part on his experi-
ence and study in party administra-
tion.
BERLIN.-Members of the Centrist
party have been ordered by its exec-
utive committee to oppose confiscation
of the property of former Emperor
William and his family when tie pop-
ular ballot on this question takes
place, June 20.

\ur eatherlan
01lk\: ,M

Washington Wants Success At Present
Geneva Parley; Cannot Consider
Other Suggestions
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, May 21.-Englishmen in
Geneva who are not connected with
the British delegation of the prepara-
tory commission on disarmament, in
session here, think it would be ex-
ceedingly difficult for Great Britain
to participate in a naval conference
between Great Britain, Japan and the
United States unless France and Italy
also took part.
The three-cornered naval conference
is the unofficial suggestion of the Jap-
anese delegates. Such a conference,
it is pointed out by the Englishmen,
necessarily would be co cerned with
smaller warcraft, in whic France and
Italy are particularly interested.
These observers declare also that the
United States and Japan, having a spe-
cial geographical 'positionremote from
possible enemies, can afford to give
relatively little importance to the
smaller warcraft, whereas Great Brit-
ain geographically is close to great
powers having strength as regards
non-capital hips.
Viscount Cecil has told the disarma-
ment meeting that it was possible
further agreement might be made with
respect to submarines and cruisers,
but he felt it his duty to point out
that the number of cruisers in the
British navy was largely governed by
needs created by having territories
overseas. Yet, he saw no reason why
"by general agreement" the size of
cruisers could not be diminished. I
Englishmen called attention to the
remarkable utility of all hind of small
craft in the late war as indicating why
Great Britain probably would hesitate
to discuss submarines and light cruis-
ers unless France and Italy had a
part in the parley.
Dr. Goudon, of Holland, president
of the preparatory disarmament com-
mission, has been appointed chair-
man of the drafting committee which
today began recasting the provisional
agenda of the proposed international
disarmament conference. When this
agenda is returned to the commission
it will reflect the opinions disclosed
in general discussion of the past week.
Hope is strong in Geneva that the dis-
armament pourparlers will at least
culminate in some modest start toward
reduction of armaments. Great re-
suIts are not expected immediately in
European land armament, chiefly be-
cause of the absence of Russia from
the deliberations and the conviction
of many states that the existing se-
curity is not sufficient to justify ex-
tensive curtailment of armaments.
WASHINGTON, May 21. - The
Washington administration feels that
everything possible should be done to
make the preparatory disarmament
limitation conference at Geneva a
success, and that it cannot at this
time consider any suggestions look-
ing to any other disarmament con-
ference.
President Coolidge was said today,
at the White Houseto adhere to his
view that both naval and land arma-
ments should be dealt with at Geneva
and that nothing should be done that
might impair the prospects of a suc-
cessful outcome of that conference.
While the American government or-
dinarily is willing to consider propos-
als for armaments limitation, it was
asserted that Mr. Coolidge felt he
could not discuss at this time the pro-
posal in official Japanese circles at
Geneva that a naval limitation con
ference be held in Washington with
the United States, Great Britain and
Japan participating.
At another time and under other
circumstances, it was added, this gov-
ernment might view with considerable
sympathy the proposal at Geneva,
which, it was made clear, was not
made upon consultation with Wash-
ington.
Debate Tryouts
To Speak Today

ENGLISHMEN WANT
ITAY, RANCE IN
NAVAL CONFERENCE
INTEREST IN SMALL WARICRAFTj
IS CAUSE OF *BRITONS'
I)EMANID

McConnell Will
Address Fourth
S'nday Service
At the fourth and lastof the Sun-
day convocations sponsored by the
Student council, Bishop Francis J.
McConnell of the Methodist Episcopal
church will give an address on "Chris-
tian Knowledge." President Clarence
Cook Little will offer the prayer of
the service.
Bishop McConnell is a liberal in the
Methodist church and is bishop of the
regional district centered at Pitts-
burgh. He is a graduate of Ohio
Wesleyan university and Boston uni-
versity. He has received the LL.D.
degree from several institutions and
for four years he was president of
Depauw university and has been a
bishop since 1912. He is the author
of a number of books, "The Divine
Immanence," "Religous Certainty,"
and "Personal Christian Christianity."
'LOENGIN'TOEND
FESTIVAL PROGRAME
Opera Will 'Be Hed Tonight; Levitzki
Will Give Piano Concert
This Afternoon
HILL WILL TAKE LEAD
Featuring Mischa Levitzki, pianist,
in the afternoon, and the opera "Lo-
hengrin" in the evening, Saturday's
concerts, which will be given at 2:30
and 8:00 o'clock in Hill auditorium,
will bring to a close the annual May
Festival.
Mischa Levitzki, who will play in
the afternoon, is an artist who has
won fame on three continents and who
is now completing his ninth tour of
America, during which time lie has
played with every major symphony
orchestra in the United States. A fea-
ture of the program will be the Con-
certo for pianoforte and orchestra inl
G iminor, by. Saint-Saens. Frederick
Stock will conduct the Chicago Sym-
phony orchestra at this concert.
A review of yesterday's concert
will be found in the Music and
Drama column on page four.
The opera "Lohengrin" will be pre-
sented in the evening with Florence
Austral, August Lenska, Richard
Crooks, and Riccardo Bonelli in the
most important roles. Florence Aus-
tral, Australian-British dramatic so-
prano, is one of the youngest of the
more outstanding artists, having made
her debut in 1922. This is her second
visit to the United States and she
is appearing in only a limited number
of engagements this spring. Augusta
Lenska is the leading Wagnerian con-
tralto of the Chicago civic opera and
I has scored marked successes wherever
she has appeared. Richard Crooks is
a young American tenor with a voice
of great beauty and charm and Ric-
cardo Bonelli, baritone of the Chicago
i Civic opera, is an artist who has
scored sensational successes in Euro-
pean opera.
Of special interest to local music
followers is the appearance of Barre
Hill, '26, who will make his operatic
debut in the role of the Herald, a part
that is said to be especially suited to
his voice.

COOGE EXTE NDS
FEDRLPOWER TO
LOCAL DRY AGENTS
SENATORS FROM BOTH PARTIES
JOIN TO FIGHT LATEST
LIQUOR ACTION
OPPOSITION BITTER
Sen. Bruce Leads Attack; Order Is
Hiled As Unconstitutional
And Outrageous
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 21.-An order
by President Coolidge authorizing the
appointment of state, county and mu-I
nicipal police as federal prohibition
officers was made public today at the
Treasury. It aroused immediate and
bitter opposition in' the Senate.
Almost immediately after the order
was published, its constitutionality
came under attack from Sen. Goff, Re-
publican, West Virginia, a former as-
sistant attorney general, Sen. King,
Democrat, Utah, a member of the Sen-
ate judiciary committee, and others.
Beyond characterizing the order as
an "outrage," Senator Bruce withheld
comment, explaining that he would
express his opinions in a speech in
the Senate. For more than four hours
he frequently sought to get recogni-
tion, but was unable to do so until
just before adjournment late in the
day.
Declaring that he found no legal
authority for such an order in the
Volstead act, the Marylander said that
if he did not think so well of President
Coolidge, he would say that the order
"was referable to mere pique, to mere
disappointment, to mere resentment
engendered by that overwhelming vic-
tory in favor of the anti-prohibition
cause in Pennsylvania, a few days ago,
when the President in vain attempted
to exert an influence over that elec-
tion."
Its constitutionality was attacked
by both Republican and Democratic
senators and the order itself was
made the subject of a fiery assault on
the President by Senator Bruce,
Democrat, Maryland.
While ready to take prompt advan-
tage of the order, prohibition officers
were not prepared to announce to
what extent they would avail them-
selves of the authority to almost quad-
ruple the strength of the enforcement
army. It was indicated that this
would be left in a large measure to
local administrators.
MECHAILENGIEERS
WILL ASMBETONIGHT1
Following a dinner to be held at 6
o'clock tonight in the main dining
room of the Union, the local chapter
of the American Society of Mechan-
ical Engineers will meet the Detroit
section of the society for a discussion
of various technical subjects in room
229, West Engineering building.
Three speakers are scheduled to
appear on the evening session. Wyeth
Allen, industrial engineer of Milwau-
kee, will talk on "Industrial Hygiene
and Theraupatics," L. F. Beach,
grad., will discuss the "Operation of
600 K. W. Engines," and the subject
of Max Benjamin, '26E, will be "What
Beconmes of the Engineering Gradu-
Iate."
In the afternoon, the society will
attend the Michigan-Illinois ball
game.
Choice Of Polish
Leader Postponed

(By Associated Press)
WARSAW, May 21.-At a conference
today between provisional President
Rataj, Premier Bartel, and Marshal
Pilsudski, it was decided to postpone
the summons for the national assem-
bly to choose a new Polish' president.
No decision has yet been reached as
to the meeting place of the assembly.-

Four Tuns
Three

Scored Off Walter in First
Innings; Jablonowski
Finishes Game

Jotlin S. Fisher
Late election returns have given
former State Banking Commissioner
Fisher a victory over his opponent,
Edward B. Beidleman, for the Penn-
sylvania Republican gubernatorial
nomination.
CANIN LAWYR
Dean Falconbridge Compares 4iehiods,
Of English And Americans In
Legal Education
LAUDS BRITISH SYSTEMI
"In the United States there are,
roughly speaking, 50 times as many
lawyers according to population than
ithere are in Canada," declared John
D. Falconbridge, dean of Osgoode Hall I
law school, Toronto, Can., in speaking
on "Some Comparisions and Con-
trasts" yesterday in room C, Law
building. Dean Falconbridge, who has
been characterized as one of the fore-
most barristers of the Dominion,
pointed out in his lecture, some of
the essential differences in the legal I
profession, and in the law of Canada
and of the United States.
In discussing the subject, Dean Fal-
conbridge mentioned the fact that the
English method of legal education,
while lacking the system and scien-
tific procedure of the American, still
produced more outstanding lawyers.
He accounted for this situation as
being due in a measure to the super-
ior education of the English student
in certain lines.
The speaker went on to show the
essential difference in the general
body of the Canadian law and that of
the United States and of the greater
freedom permitted the legislatures
with no constitutional restrictions.
The address was the annual lecture
sponsored by Coif, honorary scholastic
legal society of the Law school.
Coif, honorary legal society, held
their annual banquet last night in the
Lawyers' club. The principal address
was delivered by Dean John D. Fal-
conbridge.rHis subject was "The Es-
sentials of a Legal Education," and
he brought out a number of ideas on
what he considered to be the factors
necessary to the complete education
of the law student. Dean Henry M.
Bates of the Law school, acted as
toastmaster. Thomas C. Strachan,
'26L, spoke as representative of the
f students recently elected to the order
and Prof. Edgar N. Durfee for the fac-
ulty.
The banquet was attended by the
Law school faculty, alumni of the or-
ganization from Detroit and Chicago,
and the newly elected members.
DEAN EFFINGER To SPEAKI
AT SENI CLASS EVN
Planning the annual Class day which
will be held on June 11, the commit-
tee of which Harry W. Koemig, '26, is
chairman, announced yesterday that
Dean John R. Effinger, of the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts,
will speak from the faculty and Harry
G. Messer, '26, president of the liter-
ary class, will speak from the class.
George W. Ross, Jr., who has been re-
cntly nnnointd orator. will naeso

Given Victory In
Primary Election
IN NINTH TO BEAT
OHIO TERAM, 5 TO 4

Michigan won its sixth consecutive
victory and advanced one step nearer
to the Big Ten Conference baseball
championship by defeating the Ohio
State university baseball team, 5-4, at
Ferry field yesterday.
Inclement weather threatened}
throughout the afternoon and finally
forced the teams to abandon play .at
the close of the eighth inning with
the score 4 to 2 in favor of the Buck-
eyes. The Conference ruling, which
states that no game can be called off
until 30 minutes have elapsed from
the time play is abandoned, saved
Michigan from defeat. Rain fell upon
the' diamond for about 25 minutes be-
fore the skies cleared, giving the
Wolverines ai opportunity to play one
more inning in which to overtake the
two run lead of the Ohio State team.
Jablonowski, veteran Michigan
pitcher, proved the hero of the day,
pitching a shut-out game after he was
sent in to relieve Walter in the fourth
inning, and scoring Puckelwartz with
the winning run in the ninth inning
after two men were out.
Loos Starts Scoring
Blanchard, the Buckeye moundsman,
had pitched a steady gane before the a
rain forced the men to the dugouts,
but weakened in the last half of the
ninth inning. Blanchard issued a base
on balls to Loos, the first Michigan
man to face him. Captain Wilson wag
given first base when Blanchard threw
a wide low ball, hitting the Michigan
leader in the leg. Miller was ordered
to sacrifice with a bunt, but failed
when lie fouled to the catcher. Blan-
chard continued to be erratic, .and
threw four balls to Puckelwartz, fill-
ing the bases. Skidmore, who was
sent in to substitute for Kubicek, hit
a long fly to center field, Loos and
Wilson scoring on a wild throw from
the centerfielder, tying the score, 4-4.
With Puckelwartz on third, Jablonow-
ski hit a short bunt down the third
base line for an infield hit. Puckel-
wartz scored the winning run on the
play as Jablonowski beat out Tressel's
throw to first base.
0 .S. U. Gets Two Homers
Walter was selected by Coach Fisher
to hurl for the Wolverines, but he was
replaced by Jablonowski in the fourth,
inning after the Buckeyes had scored
four runs. Walter seemed effective in
the first inning, retiring the Scarlet
and Gray team in one, two, three or-
der, but weakened in the second frame
when Ohio scored twice on home runs.
Karow drove the ball onto the-tennis
courts for the first score of the game,
and McLaughlin followed with another
1 home run when Oosterbaan missed the
ball after an atteltpted spectacular
catch.
Ohio State scored two more runs in
the third inning when the Michigan
defense weakened. Dempsey singled
to centerfield, Karow was safe at first
on Wilson's error, Dempsey going to
second ba. 'Walter threw wild and
hit Leo, thereby filling the bases. Mc-
Laughlin hit a line drive through Wal-
ter to centerfield, scoring Dempsey
and Karow.
Michigan will play the University of
Illinois at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon.
The box score:
1Ohio State

BLABNCHARD WEAKENS IN FINAL
FRAME AND THREE RUNS
CROSS PLATE
PLAY ILLINI TODAY

Begin

Drive For
Lightless

Cars

City police have begun an "intensive
and expensive" campaign on cars im-
properly lighted, it was announced
yesterday by the chief of police. AllI
students are warned that their auto-'
mobiles that are parked with only one
light, or lacking a tail light, or lack-
ing both, will be brought into court.
Lanterns, according to the chief, will
not be accepted as substitutes for tail
lights. Twenty-five violators appear-
ed before the justice of the peace as a
result of Wednesday night's raid.
ROME.-Deputy Amedoe Bellonin of
Navara has been expelled from the'
Fascist party for breach of discipline.

Tressil, 3b........
Somner, 2b.......
Tarbert, if........
Morton, If........
Dempsey, cf......
Ka-row, ss........
Leo, lb..........
McLaughlin, rf
Mackey, c........
Blanchard, p.
Totals-.........

AB
5
4
3
1
4
4
4
3
4

R
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

H
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
3

PO
4
1
1
3
4
S2
7
1
2
0

AE
4. 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
2 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

35 4

8 25* 6 1

Seniors Dance To Night Hawks'
Music In RopeDraped Ballroom1
Under a canopy of green, purple, and that used in the pyramided ceiling cov-
white and orange ropes draped over ered the frameworks. I
the center chandelier of the Union A white rendezvous for the patrons
ballroom, more than 750 members of at the south end of the floor was the
the class of '26, danced last night to only break in the general color
the tunes of Coon-Sanders Original 'scheme of green; the booth was en-
Night Hawks of Kansas City for the closed by a white fence. The orches-
last formal dance of the near-gradu- tra alcove on the side opposite the en-
ates. Both ballrooms and the porch trance was surrounded by a lattice
nf the nionw were nsed. the three h- similnr to thatue nd on the nillara

AB
Loos, ss............4
Wilson, lb...........3
Miller, re..... ..4
Puckelwartz, cf......4
Kubicek, 2b........3
Skidmore, 2b.......1
Jablonowski, 3b, p...5
Oosterbaan, if.......4
Davis, c ............4
Walters, p...........0
Neville, 3b...........4

B R
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0.
0

H
.2
1
1
1
1
0
2
2
3
0
0

PO
1
10
1
1
3
1
3
3
4
0
0

A
3
1.
0
0
1
X1
2
0
0
0
3

E
1
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
1

Tryouts for next semester's debat-
ing class will be held at 8::30 o'cloc I
this morning in room 302, Mason halt.
Twenty students will be selected for
the class. From this number the six
members of the Central league de-
bating teams will be selected after a
neriod of intnnsive traininfp.

-
Totals.............36 5 13 27 10 3
*Jablonowski out, hit by batted ball.
Snmmarie-Two hasp hit. minah

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