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May 20, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-20

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PAGI. POUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 20, 192)G

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THF. MTCIITCAN DAT! V THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1O2~

Published every morning except Monaay
uring the University year by the Boar in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conterence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited t4 it or not otherwise
credited in this paper nd the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.44; by mail,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
lard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4lti R siess, *lsz.
D'TORiAL ITAFY-
elephone 4131
IANAGING EbITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board.. .Norman R. Thal
News Editor ........... Manning Housewortb
Women's Editor............Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor..............Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor........ William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors t~
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykka W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Ollan Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

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Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymet
George Berneike
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Carl .Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
arleton Champe.
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene H. Gutekuast
l ames T. Herald
ussell Hitt
Miles Kimball
Marion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Terndler
Henry Thurnan
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 1114
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising ..............Rudolph B*telman
Advertising..............Wm. L. Mullin
Advertising.........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation................James R. DePuy
Publication..............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts.................PaulW. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable, Jr. Frank Mosher
W. Carl Bauer F. A. Norqulst
J ohn H. Bobrink Loleta G. Parker
tanley S. Coddington David Perrot
W. J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Qilbert Thomas Sunderland
.T. Kenneth Haves Wm. J. Weinman
hlarold Holmes Nlargaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson
TI-IURSDAY, MAY 20, 1926
Night Editor-CHAS. E. BERYMER
"T. found the officers of the
TJtnied Sta es under Major Hatch
are exceedingly popular, both with
students, faculty and townspeo-
ple. found the institution
saturated with the spirit of self
Government. I found the officers
proud of their men and the show-
ing they make. I found the equip-
ment clean and usable."-O. El-
lery Edwards, a-graduate of the
Alabama Polytechnic Institute,
writing to Secretary Davis of the
War Department to repudiate
charges that the Department,
through military training in
schools, is "Prussianizing Ameri-
can youth."
CONSTANT IMPROVEMENT
By the inclusion of more technical
courses in their curricula in recent
years, engineering colleges through-
out the country have subjected them-
selves to charges that their training
lacked the cultural value necessary
to give their graduates a broad out-
look of life. Realization of this de-
ficiency has lead to several investi-
gations of the entire field of engineer-
ing education, including one of na-
tional sec pe which was started three
years ag under a grant from the
Carnegie tfoundation. In cooperation
with, the latter movement, the faculty
of the Colleges of Engineering and
Architecture has taken the lead
among' American technical institu-
tions in investigating local conditions.
Culminating three years of study on
the various phases of the subject the
faculty committee has drafted definite
resolutions recommending both new
nd revised methods. In general,
their execution would increase the
non-technical portion of the engineer-
ing curricula, provide better instruc-
tion, and furnish vocational guidance
t prospective engineering student
As indicative of these probable
changes, these drafts mark a signi-
floant step in the improvement of
rngineering education.
Furthermore, the resolutions are
notable in view of their priority of
definite expression. By their zeal
and progress in the investigation, the
local committees have outdistanced
even the national organization, which
gvill not meet fcr final compilation of

COLLEGIATE
Our yllegiate career dates back to
the time when Hill street was un-
paved. We remember the paving of
that street, and the great number of
red lanterns that were necessarily
scattered about the construction work.
We also remember that it was con-
sidered quite collegiate to have one
of those red lanterns to heighten the
atmosphere of the "truly collegiate"
room. That is, it was collegiate as far
as various poor, misguided freshmen
were concerned.
Things are ever thus. The fresh-
man, away from home for the first
time, considers anything unusual,
anything that he may do at college
that he did not, for one reason or
another, do at home, as collegiate.
Little does he realize that, in the final
analysis, the collegiate way of doing
things, if there is any such way, is
usually the most conservative way
available.
Thus we are informed that the city
of Ann Arbor is forced to set aside
flve hundred dollars annually to re-
place street signs torn down by stu-
dents. Perhaps there is not better
analysis of this situation than that
contained in a letter which we re-
cently received from a prominent,
and, incidentally, popular, faculty
man:
"Not only is this expense unneces-
sary, but there is always a delay be-
tween the time that the sign is torn
from its post and the time a new one
can be installed. In these days of
universal travel, strangers are in our
city at all times, and street signs are
one of the greatest conveniences tha
we can provide."
Street signs are really petty things,
but the treatment they receive often
serves to point out petty minds. We
are heartily in favor of the upholding
of those few traditions that are left
and of class spirit, but we are unable
to classify the destruction of street
signs under either head.
YOU'RE SPEEDING-NO FINE
"An 'honor system' by which kind-
ness instead of fear is employed in
enforcing traffic regulations on Pueblo
County (Colorado) highways has
proved highly effective after three
months' operation," declares a story
in the Christian Science Monitor.
There are still traffic officers, but in-
stead of arresting speeders and other
traffic law violators, they explain the
law and the necessity of compliance
for the mutual protection of all the
parties concerned.
It is an "honor system," and it
works on the highways with people
of all classes, from the dirt farmer
on his way to market to the wealthy
tourist on his way to warmer climes.
The honor system works there, and
yet there are those who maintain that
it will not work in a university, in this
University.
The honor system works because
it is based, not upon fear, but upon
reason and respect for the rights of
others. An honor system with the
same basis would be successful at
Michigan.
EDITORIAL COMMENT

f CO-ED
CAP
'iI ROLLS
Those lanterns, symbolizing the
Sbrightness of college days, managed
to glow in spite of the threatening
rain, symbolizing the final exams.
* * *
The freshman pageant portrayed
all the hopes, dreams, etc., that enter
into the life of a college girl. For in-
stance, we suppose the "Jestor" was
Chimes, "mocking all." s
* * *
And then the "Dreams" ought to be
represented by philosophy lectures.
* * *
The part of "Beauty" would be filled
by The Blue Bird Shoppe.
* * *
"Doubt" could well be impersonated
by a co-ed posing as a student.
* * *
Obviously, "Fear" would be repre-
sented by a blue book.
NOTICE TO THOSE THOUSANDS
OF READERS WHO TELEGRAPHED
IN PROTESTS REGARDING THE
NON-APPEARANCE OF ROLLS YES-
TERDAY: WE DENY ALL RUMORS
TO THE EFFECT THAT THE PO-
LICE SUPRESSED THE COLUMN.
* * *
And to President Coolidge: We
promise not to disappoint you again.
Now the journalists will be coming
forth with jokes to the effect that,
even though they are holding editing
classes in the old Medical building,
there will be no doctoring of news.
Have you a little Indian in your
houseT
THE OLD DAYS
Having thus rested for a few days,
and knowing only too well the plight
in which the esteemed Mr. Hay must
find himself, we gallantly take pen
in hand in his behalf.
Just what there is to say, is a prob-
lem since Mr. Hay seems to have cov-
ered the ground pretty well. (Person-
ally we call him Timothy but how
should you know that?)
Of course the proper thing to do is
to remenisce (that isn't the right
spelling, but the dictionary doesn't
give it and who are we to set our-
selves up a lexicographer) anyway the
right thing to do is to remenisce (at
least we are consistent) about the
thrills and sorrows of the years gone
by, and so forth and so on. We really
should have done this before retir-
ing, but what with one thing and an-
other we never got to it.
Well, anyway the most thrilling ex-
perience we ,had during our term of
office came with the first publication
of the B. and G. News. When this
first appeared we argued two days
and three nights with the editor to
allow us to print the entire paper un-
der a big ROLLS head, but he refused
and we had to publish all the meatier
parts in two or three separate col-
umns.
This was, indeed, our first blow,
We never quite recovered from it, and
to this day whenever we see a copy
of the B. and G. News we are liable
to do anything from fainting away in
the nearest person's arms to kissing
the Dean of Women.
Talking about B. and G. news puts
us in mind of- well we could keep on
like that for hours, but we wouldn't
do Mr. Hay such a dirty trick.

Sir Toby Tiffin.
(Editor's Note: Sir Toby Tiffin, for-
mer editor of this department, who
recently retired in order to assume
the editorship of the B. and G. News
has kindly consented to our publish-
ing some of his private documents, as
above, most of which were found in
the bottom of his desk in this office
and consist of old envelopes and rot-
ten articles by himself and others.
Sir Toby Tiffin.
* * *
NO MUSIC but REAL DRAMA
Fish Horns Without Harmony
She was whamdoodle sweet, this
Raga Carey, the wild-flower of the
mountains, in that movie put on at the
Goodwill meeting by the Tolstoy
league.
Everything happens in the little
village which the beautiful sub-title
said nestled in the southern hill. Uncle
Sam was a big farmer. After the war
is over, and because the United States
doesn't join the Laague of Nations,
old Uncle Sam kills himself. Sad, in-
deed.
-Count Asparagus.
* * **
There's one thing about that Uncle
Sam movie we can't understand:
* * *
Why didn't the Rae show it?

Music-
ANDI
DRAMA
TONIGHT : The University School
of Music announces the second concert
of the annual May Festival at 8
o'clock in Hill auditorium.
MADAM HOMER
A review, by Robert Ramsay.
It was the type of concert that
critics seek, perhaps in vain, to em-
balm forever in the pale amber of
their pagan prose. Here, memory
must perform the office that faltering
words cannot do. The Don Fatale
aria was unforgettable. Homer has a
voice like an archangel. If there is
regeneration in music, it must come
after hearing such women as Schu-
mann-Heinck and Louise Homer.
She has many virtues-her deep
sincerity, her compelling sympathy,
her majestic serenity; she has but
one fault, it is her failure to articu-
late her tonecarefully. She sings
with a tone that splashes liberally
over the entire landscape. Like all
great singers, she paints every note
of her voice. Where Mary Garden
(wonderful woman!) chooses to loak,

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SKILLED REPAIRING

Have your pen looked over-See that
is in Perfect Order for Finals-No charge for this
service or better yet Exchange it for a
Rider
The pen that holds a whole barrel full of ink
and wont run dry or balk in the middle of an exam.

.
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A A
Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
in1RSis time now to order your calling
Cards for ComtnenCemcnt.
GRAHAMM'S BOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

-ider's .Shop
The one place in Michigan where Real P
ers' service is to be had

P/.

SWest Wind Lending Library
" MAYNARD STREET
i The latest ooks for Rent:
The Silver Sta'lijn Jares Branch Cabell
-.Ih,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Madam Homer
in the initial concert of the
May Festival

annualI

THE VERMONT ISSUE
(The Boston Transcript)
Ou'r hats off to a politician who
means what he says. The inimitable
John Barrett, whose name had not
appeared on the front page for many
moons, announced his tentative can-
didacy for the Republican nomination
for United States senator in Vermont,
with the proviso, however, that if any
man more loyal than he to President
Coolidge should desire the same hon-
or, he would retire. Along comes for-
mer Governor William W. Stickney of
Ludlow, law partner of Attorney Gen-
eral Sargent, and the former minister
to Siam makes good. "Placing gen-
eral good before personal considera-
tions," he says, "practising what I
preach and wishing to avoid dissipa-
tion of President Coolidge's strengthl
in Vermont, as is being done by some
other States by multiplicity of candi-
dates," he unreservedly withdraws in
favor of Governor Stickney. This is
good sense, good politics and good
fellowship.
All of which is interesting but not
overwhelmingly important. It is of
moment, however, that Governor1
Stickney should have entered the con-
test against Senator Dale, for he 4has
done so as the avowed Coolidge can-j
didate, if we may judge from his' an-
nouncement, and the issue is 'clear
cut. "I am in sympathy with the wise
statesmanship of President Coolidge,"
he says, "and the same policies for
which lie stands. Because I believe
in Calvin Coolidge and in the great-
ness of the work he is doing for goodj

her pallette with the blues and silver
grays of Velasquez, Homer turns to
the midnight blue, the soft glowing
red of Titian, and despite her failure
to articulate the tone, it is so rich in
color, so vibrant, so sensitive, and re-
sponsive, that it cannot fail to move
one to transrorts of delight. Margaret
Matzenauer, with a passionate op-
ulence that is alnost brutal, turns
one inside out in excitement. Homer,
with a calmness, and serenity, even
an austerity that is almost Puritan,
with a tenderness and majestic sym-
pathy of love, can move one to tears.
The Mozart aria displayed her to
be a perfect mistress of elegant sing-
ing, while in the Don Fatale, she
sang with such intense dramatic ef-
fect that the thunderous applause
seemed too weak a response. Her
voice is not powerful, one is not con-
scious of immense reserve, unlimited
power, she gives all she has, but it is
of such intense beauty that an audi-
ence is immediately won by its charm.
The beauty of her singing was no
where more apparent than in her last
encore; her greatness never greate-
than in the Don Fatale aria; her
weakness, no where, more distressing
than in the first number with the
piano.
Then there is Frederick Stock. Con-
summate actor, wonderful musician-
Caesar with a baton, Stock, with a
bow that is worth the price of ad-
mission to watch. He has the great
est bow that is bowed before any
audience in this generation, of such
infinite elegance as one can only
imagine if one has not seen it. No one
is greater in Beethoven or Wagner-
few orchestras equal to the Chicago
group.
* * *
COMEDY CLUB
The following officers were elected
in the business meeting of Comedy
Club which was held yesterday after-
noon in University Hall: president,
Valentine Davies, '27; vice-president,
Phyllis Loughton, '28; secretary, Mi-
nerva Miller, '27; treasurer, Dale.
Shafer, '26.
THE DUCHESS ANI) TIlE WAITER
Quite happy, they say, is the Ann
Harding-Rollo Peters combination at
the Garrick in "The Grand Duchess
and the WIaiter," the Arthur Richman
translation of the French farce of
waiters, bathtubs, of a pauper duch-
ess and the Swiss republic. The play
in itself is broad comedy with humor
of situation as well as lines that
strangely lose little in the translationI
-lines that the Comedie Francaise is
still snickering at-in a nice way!
The story is of a Grand Duchess
done in the grand manner by Miss
Harding, the pretty waiter who spills
butter down her neck and whom she
attaches to her service to find that
he is the son of the president of the

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hen it's a rainy
night-and with three.. crafty,
bridge players your luck
is running wiWd
-have a Camrel!

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE

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J:~..
kv'>~

WHEN the dark skies are
pouring rain outside.
And fickle fate deals you
hands at bridge that you
play with consummate
skill-have a Camel!
For Camel is the silent
partner that helps every
deserving player win his
game. Camels never hurt
or tire the taste, never
leave a trace of cigaretty
after-taste. Regardless of
the gold you spend,
you'll never get choicer
tobaccos than those
rolled into Camels.
So this evening as you
ply your unerring skill,
evoke then the mellow-
est fragrance that ever
came from a cigarette.
Have a Camel!

YK f1

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